Jump to content

Nominations for Tractor of the Month
Garden Tractors and Parts on eBay



Photo
- - - - -

Wheelhorse C-120 CH22 Kohler engine swap.


  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1 tractordude88 OFFLINE  

tractordude88

    New Member

  • New Member
  • Member No: 1962
  • 0 Thanks
  • 1 posts
  • Location: heath ohio

Posted February 01, 2011 - 09:30 PM

I am trying to install a kohler CH22 in my wheel horse c-120 any idea's?:ass:

#2 mjodrey OFFLINE  

mjodrey

    Accumulator

  • Senior Member
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 92
  • 2,343 Thanks
  • 13,481 posts
  • Location: Upper Granville, Nova Scotia, Canada

Posted February 02, 2011 - 11:41 AM

tractordude88:welcometogttalk:


I'm not a Wheel Horse guy,but there are a few on here.I'm sure one of them will be along shortly.

#3 MikesRJ OFFLINE  

MikesRJ

    One of the 1st 500!

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 462
  • 70 Thanks
  • 118 posts
  • Location: S/E - PA

Posted February 02, 2011 - 12:49 PM

I've never attempted to replace a K301S with a CH22, but I am fully aware of the hurdles you're going to face. Keep mindful of the following information you must get before purchasing the engine, or if you already have the engine in hand, what you will need to determine before proceeding. One thing about engine transfers, if you are not absolutely familiar with engine mechanics, engine electrical, and fabrication where necessary, you could be in for a very expensive learning experience. That said, read on.

1) Of First Importance: If the two engine's (old and new) output shafts are not the exactly the same (length, width, and general configuration: i.e. drilled and tapped end, keyed, etc), then you should find another engine or be prepared to fabricate/procure parts as you continue. Otherwise you will be replacing a whole list of parts to match the new engine shaft parameters. Could get excessively expensive.

2) Of Second Importance: Determine the dimensions of the original engines shaft relative to some fixed point on the tractor. The new engine will have to be installed such that the center line of the output shaft is in exactly the same location as the previous engine; This includes front to back on the tractor, the same height above the frame, and the same offset distance left to right. Think of this part as getting the PTO pulley in the same exact location as the previous engine. As an example, say the old engine from oil pan base to shaft-center height is 8", and the new engine is 7". You will need to create a mounting plate of some sort (which will bolt to the tractor frame and new engine will bolt to the plate) in order to get the shaft height correct. Then you will need to determine where to drill all the holes in the plate for both mounting the plate to tractor, and engine to the plate. If the new engine is higher than the old, your generally out of luck unless that engine manufacturer offers alternate oil pan heights, and they actually have one which "shortens" the engine by how much you need it to be shortened. (Think of this part as spending more money).

3) Of Third Importance: Getting the electrical system hooked up. All of the connections for the new engine will have to be compared to the old. This may include changing the key switch to accommodate new requirements on the new engine that did not exist on the old, or could be different connectors on the new engine than the old one had.

4) Of Fourth Importance: Will the new engines muffler fit under the hood when it is positioned in its required location? Can it be routed in a different way and not look like a hideous mess? Is piping available to make the new routing, or will you have to manufacture said piping.

These are all good questions to answer yourself before you start, or the expenses will begin to mount rapidly. I'm not trying to scare you off of doing a modification to your machine. I am just pointing out some of the things I learned in the past when "flying by the seat of my pants" in what was then a rather new territory for me. I did eventually get the engines swapped, and I was lucky that I got away fairly cheaply, but after all was said and done I realized how expensive the learning might have been had I not been so lucky.

I have just one question though; Why do you want to put a roughly $1400.00 CH22 in place of a K301S, and not just go with a new K301, 321, or a 341 for about the same price? Also, I think 22 HP on a C-120 is pretty much overkill. All that extra horsepower is really rather unnecessary, and gas prices will not be going down, when a smaller increase of say 14-16hp (i.e. K321 or 341) would supply all the power you would ever need, and be an almost direct drop-in replacement?

Edited by MikesRJ, February 02, 2011 - 08:09 PM.


#4 caseguy OFFLINE  

caseguy

    Connoisseur of Rusty Junk

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 906
  • 1,624 Thanks
  • 5,600 posts
  • Location: Edinburg, PA

Posted February 02, 2011 - 06:57 PM

:wave: tractordude88 Welcome to GTTalk! I have a C-105 myself. I've never done an engine swap like you're wanting to attempt. Mike is right on all counts, but if you feel that this is something that you want to tackle, don't be dissuaded, just be aware of the potential pit falls. We hope that you enjoy the forum and we'd love to see some pics!

#5 thirdroc17 OFFLINE  

thirdroc17

    Member

  • Member
  • Member No: 1805
  • 36 Thanks
  • 91 posts

Posted February 06, 2011 - 05:35 PM

Wheel Horses, and I assume most garden tractors, rely on the ball bearings in the engine to withstand the side thrust of the PTO clutch. Does the new engine include the proper bearing setup to take this side load?

Funny thing, I just picked up a Honda GX-670, and I'm not sure about this myself in that engine!!! LOL

#6 mikebramel OFFLINE  

mikebramel

    Ron Paul

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 82
  • 176 Thanks
  • 1,009 posts
  • Location: Milwaukee

Posted February 06, 2011 - 05:59 PM

It doesnt have ball bearings like the splash lubricated models but the main journals are pressure lubricated so there shouldnt be anything to worry about

#7 thirdroc17 OFFLINE  

thirdroc17

    Member

  • Member
  • Member No: 1805
  • 36 Thanks
  • 91 posts

Posted February 06, 2011 - 06:34 PM

Pressure lube on a roller bearing doesn't add anything to it's thrust holding capability. That's all about design of the bearing. I know some Wheel Horses that used Briggs engines had to add a supplemental thrust bearing behind the clutch plate. Otherwise, the crank would slowly be pushed out the other side of the engine.

#8 mikebramel OFFLINE  

mikebramel

    Ron Paul

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 82
  • 176 Thanks
  • 1,009 posts
  • Location: Milwaukee

Posted February 06, 2011 - 07:41 PM

Yes
Most of those aluminum engines need those additional support or the crank would grind right into the side cover LOL "industrial commerical"




Top