Jump to content

Nominations for Tractor of the Month
Garden Tractors and Parts on eBay



Photo
- - - - -

Onions


  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 FrozenInTime OFFLINE  

FrozenInTime
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 46384
  • 566 Thanks
  • 352 posts
  • Location: Norf Dakoota

Posted June 27, 2014 - 10:32 PM

My are shooting up real nice/tall.  I have heard rumors, but none of my buds have actually raised onions, so I must ask.  Last year I tried a few and they were all duds/tiney bulbs.

 

When an onion gets large on top, going to seed (?), do you cut these off, or I've also heard bend them over but don't break them off?  Bend them at the pod, or at ground level?  Since this is such a short season in the northern frozen tundra, do you leave them in the ground until frost, or first freeze?  Any suggestions would be greatly appriciated.

 

 

Gotta brag:  My taters are getting real tall!  Last year they did real bad, only maybe 4 to a plant.  This year they are about 1.5 foot tall already, growing like weeds!  Last year I used old/store taters, this year I actually bought seed taters.  Really looking forward to them!!


  • tinbender7 and propane1 have said thanks

#2 oldedeeres OFFLINE  

oldedeeres
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 14008
  • 5,856 Thanks
  • 3,193 posts
  • Location: Rivers End, Saskatchewan

Posted June 28, 2014 - 01:05 AM

Hi Frozen, I'm north of you by a fair tad, more than 300 miles, and generally manage to get pretty good onions, but as a general rule we are wetter than you. Used to live by Weyburn in southern Sask. so am familiar with your climate. When my onions get a seed head I break it off(cut it ) as low as I can. That way the onion doesn't waste growing energy producing seed. There are a lot of mixed feelings on the bending them over topic. Some feel that doing this forces the onion to grow a bigger bulb, others say it only opens the plant to disease and rot by breaking the fibres. Personally I let them fall over by themselves naturally. Some never bend over. I pull them after the first light frost when they have matured and have a dry, papery skin,( or are getting close to that stage), cut the tops off about two inches from the bulb and let them dry on a screen supported by a couple of pails so there is good air circulation, generally in the shop, out of the sun. When they are good and dry I hand rub any dirt and excess papery skin off, don't peel them, and then put them in mesh bags and hang them in the cold room. I hope this helps you out some.
As far as potatoes go, I use my own saved seed, the best ones I have left come spring. If I want to try something new I buy registered seed from a seed house. Over the years we have found it pays to plant the best seed we can find. Sometime supermarket eating spud have been treated so they don't sprout in storage. What varieties did you plant this year?
  • tinbender7, FrozenInTime and propane1 have said thanks

#3 propane1 ONLINE  

propane1
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 54307
  • 6,107 Thanks
  • 3,199 posts
  • Location: Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, Canada

Posted June 28, 2014 - 05:14 AM

Great information. Any thoughts on how to control the potatoe bug ? The bug can ruin a potatoe patch in a few weeks. Noel
  • tinbender7, oldedeeres and FrozenInTime have said thanks

#4 shorty ONLINE  

shorty

    Member

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Member No: 6172
  • 3,539 Thanks
  • 3,926 posts
  • Location: Lancaster County Pa

Posted June 28, 2014 - 06:04 AM

I used to pick them off by hand. Now I take the quicker way of spraying. I had gotten a jug of over the counter bug spray that seemed to do the trick fairly good. It usually takes two sprayings to put a dent in the population.


  • tinbender7, oldedeeres, FrozenInTime and 1 other said thanks

#5 HowardsMF155 OFFLINE  

HowardsMF155

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 4243
  • 2,699 Thanks
  • 2,916 posts
  • Location: Central NC

Posted June 28, 2014 - 07:53 AM

There are specific potato beetle pesticides that really work well.  Look for a pesticide containing "Bacillus Thuringiensis" which is an organic pesticide that has worked well for me the last two years.

 

I've been told that a potato beetle infestation is also a sign of a weakened plant, that the plant wasn't doing well BEFORE the infestation and that if those kinds of conditions are corrected, the potato beetle problem is lessened.  While I don't know if that is true, I will say that the last two years I've spent extra time and effort hilling potatoes and giving them plenty of ground space and water and my bug problems have noticeably lessened.


  • tinbender7, oldedeeres, FrozenInTime and 1 other said thanks

#6 FrozenInTime OFFLINE  

FrozenInTime
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 46384
  • 566 Thanks
  • 352 posts
  • Location: Norf Dakoota

Posted June 28, 2014 - 12:51 PM

On my taters, I bought a Red Variety.  I planted them bout 4 inches deep, spaced 1 to 1.5 foot apart.  I raised the hills bout 10 inches then laid another 2-3 inches of grass clippings on top.  After I fix my bagger (broke it, not watching clearances... ) I plan on covering with another 3-4 inches of clippings.

 

Thanks for the onion info!  I will cut off the pods and let the stems alone to bend/fall over on their own.


  • oldedeeres and propane1 have said thanks

#7 oldedeeres OFFLINE  

oldedeeres
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 14008
  • 5,856 Thanks
  • 3,193 posts
  • Location: Rivers End, Saskatchewan

Posted June 28, 2014 - 05:42 PM

I grow two red varieties, Sangre and Norland , Purple Viking, and good old Netted gem. Mostly I'm pretty low tech with the bugs and pick them by hand, although if it's a real bad infestation I use Rotenone. Ruth Stout, "the mother of mulch" , advocated digging a trench, dropping in the spuds, and just covering the trench over with straw or a like substance, and then just lifting the straw off at harvest. Claimed it was easier than digging and you didn't get speared potatoes. I tried it once but didn't like it much--- I prefer getting down on my hands and knees and digging in the dirt, lol.


  • HowardsMF155, FrozenInTime and propane1 have said thanks




Top