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Refinishing Old Hardwood Floors....?'s


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#1 TAHOE OFFLINE  

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Posted June 25, 2014 - 02:36 PM

Okay, so I knew this was coming soon, but my sister is taking mom outta town for a week July 3 so my schedule just got bumped up perfect timing to do it since she will be gone for a week....happy July 4th to me :hitting_self_roller:

 

Anyway, I got the sanding all down pat and access to several type of large and small sanders, my questions are.....finishes.

 

Anyone recommend a rally good finish such as a good polyeurathane? My nephew used the "varathane" brand and after 8 months is showing scratches from the dogs and a table they re-did shows stains and water marks.

I heard water based finishes are easy to apply, dry quick but not very durable.

At this point it will be no pre-staining, just sand, clean and poly. May change once I pull carpet this weekend and actually see condition of floors. Been carpeted over for at least 45 yrs

 

What did you all use to apply? natural bristles or a mop type applicator?

 

 

Thanks!!!

 

 


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#2 dthomp17 ONLINE  

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Posted June 25, 2014 - 03:19 PM

My only experience has been on cabinets and furniture and I use the Minnwax water based polyurethane and I spray it on.  I've been very pleased with the results so far.  It's expensive but it saves a lot of time since it dries fast and you can apply a couple of coats (with light sanding in between) in just a few hours.  However, for floors I would probably use the oil based polyurethane because it dries slower and would have more time to smooth out after application.  I've not had any experience on floors but I think you could apply it with a roller.  What ever you decide to use, be sure to wear a good respirator during application.


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#3 KC9KAS OFFLINE  

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Posted June 25, 2014 - 03:46 PM

19 years ago we put down 3/4" T & G Red Oak flooring. We put several coats of a water base polyeurathane with a medium nap roller. Be careful to roll slow so you don't get bubbles.

The floors look pretty good except where the bar-stools have been pushed in and out.

Very easy to clean with a mild detergent and flat mop.

 

My folks had beautiful hardwood floors through-out their house (built in 1960) but was all covered in the 80's with rubber backed carpet!


Edited by KC9KAS, June 25, 2014 - 03:46 PM.


#4 Lauber1 OFFLINE  

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Posted June 25, 2014 - 04:49 PM

when I was young we used to do the floors every so many yrs. Grandpa has a big upright belt sander that was made for flooring. It sanded and vac the floor at the same time, but you had to watch where you stopped it, or it would eat right though. After wards we applied just a regular varnish, then a lite sanding then another coat or 2. After that it got waxed and us kids got to slide around in our socks to polish it up. these floors lasted several yrs with just varnish, so maybe a guy don't need anything fancy to coat them. I remember them putting it on with a short napped roller on a long handle.



#5 skyrydr2 OFFLINE  

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Posted June 25, 2014 - 05:11 PM

You will need to strip them and sand lightly. To strip off wax and shellac use 60 grit on a plate sander and to keep from going through paper like mad sprinkle powdered TSP on the floor and use it as a sanding medium this will help the shellac balls stay off the paper. Takes a bit of practice but works AWESOME!! Then you can finish sand with 150 and tack off dust and pour on the poly. That's right poor it on and squeegee it around .finish edges with a brush. Keep any fuzzy crap away!! It will leave lint behind ! Epoxy is the toughest but also crazy expensive too. Poly by min wax oil based works well but needs time to dry!!


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#6 HANKG ONLINE  

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Posted June 25, 2014 - 05:29 PM

BEST WAY TO  GO CALL PROFESSIONAL, THEN GO FISHING OR TRACTORING JUST SAYIN.


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#7 Cat385B ONLINE  

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Posted June 25, 2014 - 07:53 PM

I'll second the short nap roller.

 

Water based if you want the finish clear, oil if you want a slight yellow tinge or if you happen to have white oak under there and want some color. I have used Old Masters and Minwax, liked them both.



#8 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted June 25, 2014 - 08:01 PM

The stuff they put on my White Oak floors 18 years ago was a water based poly. called Waterlox. Not sure on that spelling. Very durable stuff. They started by giving the floor a coat of tongue oil as a sealer. If you can get access to a professional finish like waterlox it will give you a better result. The waterlox was applied by pouring it on the floor and using a pad applicator to spread it out. I'm sure there is a knack to doing this but it did go on fast. Check with sellers of raw flooring. They will know where to get the finishes. It's not an easy job to strip and refinish a large area. It always seems to take much longer then planned.  As said above, consider getting quotes from pros! 


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#9 TAHOE OFFLINE  

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Posted June 26, 2014 - 07:50 AM

Thanks for responses. Seems you all have had good luck with the water based finsishes, I have read they are not so durable.

Guess it's all in the eye of the beholder.

I shop at Menards, they had a "floor" poly in Minwax and "High traffic floor" in Varathane brand, of course, about $8-10 more a gallon than the regular.

Not sure what wife will want, she may like the yellow or honey look the poly will give. The little sanding I did looks to be maybe a hard maple or the likes, not oak from what I can tell, not an oka color or grain.

 I suspect it will be high gloss no matter what she goes with.

Menards had a low nap brush style applicator for oil. Many of the youtbue videos I have watched show people using these or just a big brush.

 

BEST WAY TO  GO CALL PROFESSIONAL, THEN GO FISHING OR TRACTORING JUST SAYIN.

 

I already have checked with a few.....if I paid someone to do it, I wouldn't have money to go anywhere or do anything for a long time. Most are charging $2.50-3.50 per square foot.....I have a lot of square foot. :wallbanging:

I still have to buy materials to expand mudroom, build a bedroom, add a 100 amps sub panel and buy a water softener before we can move in, gotta save money anywhere I can so floors are on me!

 

I am hoping to have all my coats down within a week. Mom is Leaving July 3rd, planning to leave work early, sand the rest of that day, then start finishing.

 

I pulled some carpet back last night, hit it with 100 grit on my small belt sander "just to see". It will definitely need a coarse grit to strip, not much taken off and it clogged that belt in a heartbeat, but...I was just experimenting :D

We found this issue when we pulled upstairs carpet also, but it seems they had a nice finish on the outside 1 1/2-2' then the center of room was maybe carpet or some type of floor covering over wood. It appears to be two different colors, maybe they stained the outside edge before finishing or it's just was maintained over the years iwth polish, etc, I dunno.

Guess I will not know until I get the sander in there. I am borrowing a 17" circular buffer style sander, but I am going to rent a belt or drum sander. Just afraid the circular will make scratch marks going across grain, I can run belt sanding with grain.


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#10 TAHOE OFFLINE  

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Posted June 27, 2014 - 08:39 AM

Took a couple quick pics form the other night. Stupid phone is starting to take blurry pics for some reason.

The small white spots are paint, the big blobs are drywall mud, probably from when dad dropped the ceilings in 1971 :D

 

 

floor.JPG .

floor sanded.JPG



#11 TAHOE OFFLINE  

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Posted June 30, 2014 - 09:57 AM

S-day ( stripping day) is getting closer. Sister and wife painted walls this weekend, son and I haul a bunch of furniture to a relative yesterday. The boy is pulling carpet today, belt sander on reserve for Thurs. Getting off work 1/2 day and hitting it hard Thurs afternoon. 

After doing some research, decided on going oil base. I have never done water and from what I have read, if it dries on ya, you can get lines in finish that can only be sanded back out. I've used plenty of oil base finishes on wood work/cabinets so I am comfortable with that. Also ,the water base leave a clear finish, oil gives a yellower finish which I think will help this floor look warmer. 

I did a larger test sand area with small belt sander, looks like wood is a pine or maple but some boards have gray streaks in them. I know I've worked with wood before like that, I was thinking Poplar??? but that is a softer wood so I am not sure. It's sure a light yellow though what ever it is. Wife wants all dings, holes, etc left in, she wants an old beat up farm house floor look.  like putting the lipstick on a pig haha. It will look good though I think

 

 

Empty rooms.....

 

Front Living room   16x17

 

floor carpet LR.jpg

floor carpet LR 2.jpg

 

Dining Room   14x16

 

floor carpet dr.jpg

floor carpet dr 2.jpg

 

 

 


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#12 Sawdust OFFLINE  

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Posted June 30, 2014 - 09:53 PM

Took a couple quick pics form the other night. Stupid phone is starting to take blurry pics for some reason.

The small white spots are paint, the big blobs are drywall mud, probably from when dad dropped the ceilings in 1971 :D

 

 

attachicon.giffloor.JPG.

attachicon.giffloor sanded.JPG

The second pic looks like tongue & groove pine plank flooring. This was used as a sub floor not to be seen but today it's popular to paint or stain this for a rustic look. Old growth Poplar will have green to gray & even black streaks running parallel with the grain. Today's Poplar that are harvested are mostly Hybrids not much heart wood if any at all. Like you mentioned these woods are on the soft side but the Poplar can be hard near the heartwood. Regardless it will help your finish wanting to leave the character in the finish. I'm old school I haven't grasped the water base finishes yet, I know most are using them mainly because they dry faster. I think the oil base will give you a nice honey color. Water base will leave you with what your looking at when you apply. Hat off to ya Marty for tackling this yourself, tough job but rewarding at the end. :thumbs:


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#13 TAHOE OFFLINE  

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Posted July 01, 2014 - 08:41 AM

Thanks Jim, it will be some hard work, but with cost involved in replacing carpet or covering with another flooring, it's a no brainer. We don't have the money for new flooring at the moment so what will it hurt? A few days a work, maybe $200 in supplies and I am stuck with a finished old look farm house floor that looks good or If it doesn't turn out well, we can always cover with another flooring down the road once we get our house sold, moved in and can save up some money. 

 

If you look in my first pic in the upper right hand corner, you can see virgin wood there and how light it was. That was under a wall I took out.

I have been doing a few test sand areas, it is a 3 or 3 1/2" tongue and groove board and i have double 1" thick flooring. I have a wider tongue and groove underneath, then this top layer. The upstairs bedrooms have two layers of the sub-floor material, downstairs got an upgrade on the top layer. I wasn't sure what it was, but now I am thinking it is a pine board, it is light color and has some redness in some of the boards. I have some gray in them too, but I think that is just grime that has discolored the boards over the years. I have some type of oil stains in a a few spots not sure what they came from. I sanded them out and they got somewhat light, but I guess they will be added character once I finish it.

I also found some chips, holes  and splinters in a couple areas.  am going to get some water based filler, sand a non coated area then mix the filler with some of the sawdust and fill the holes then sand. Hopefully that will kind of keep patch the same color.

son got 3/4 of the carpet out yesterday, I will post pics once he gets the rest out before I start sanding! 

Gotta figure out how to take out some of the squeaks too, definitely an old wood floor, no one can sneak into the kitchen  :D


Edited by TAHOE, July 01, 2014 - 08:52 AM.

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#14 TAHOE OFFLINE  

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Posted July 02, 2014 - 08:07 AM

Looks really different without carpet....and the echoes, echoooes, echooooes  :D Definitely will need some runner carpets or area rugs.

Found a couple surprises, couple small chunks missing in various places. The worst was a  large line in part of the floor, I'm betting my dad was cutting a sheet of plywood directly on floor and went through gouging into floor. I used the small belt sander and got rid of most of line, I tried to also feather it out some so I didn't have a big dip in the floor. The large belt sander will help that more tomorrow. A couple spots are too deep so I put filler in them along with a few holes. I know they will show, but at least they won't collect dirt. I have got some light stain, I may try to sand and blend them a little tonight when I work on it.

 

floor 1.jpg

floor 2.jpg

floor 3.jpg

floor 4.jpg

floor 6.jpg

 

Man, someone had been driving a GT in there and left turf tire marks  :thumbs: 

Anyone who has ever torn out 60's/70's carpet knows what this is from. This was from previous carpet, the stuff we tore out had the foam.

 

floor 5.jpg

 

 


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#15 oldedeeres OFFLINE  

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Posted July 02, 2014 - 12:37 PM

Carpet is attractive and warm on the feet in the winter, but Oh My Gosh it's filthy stuff over the years, no matter how much it's vacuumed!! I love a hardwood floor, easy to keep clean, and you'll be surprised at how it "opens" a room up and makes it appear bigger. Curtains, furniture and pictures on the walls will help take care of the echo. I'm looking forward to the pics of the finished project. Thanks for sharing your project.
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