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Rimguard


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#1 HoosierGrass75 OFFLINE  

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Posted June 24, 2014 - 10:41 PM

I'm thinking of getting Rim Guard put in my 26x12x12 tires. How much weight would this give me and will it make a difference in traction while mowing my yard? I have ag tires on it as well. Thanks for any input.

#2 Cat385B ONLINE  

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Posted June 24, 2014 - 11:11 PM

85-100 pounds per tire. It will very difficult to spin a tire on sod.

One thing to remember, a wheel weight puts it's weight on the axle. Liquid puts the weight on the bottom of the tire. It's more effective and less of a strain on the machine.
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#3 BillTheTractorMan OFFLINE  

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Posted June 24, 2014 - 11:27 PM

85-100 pounds per tire. It will very difficult to spin a tire on sod.

One thing to remember, a wheel weight puts it's weight on the axle. Liquid puts the weight on the bottom of the tire. It's more effective and less of a strain on the machine.


how does a wheel weight that is attached to the rim add weight to the axle? A weight box would put weight on the axle.


If there's any added stress from wheel weights the same would be added with fluid.


adding fluid to the tires will definitely increase traction.

sent from my telecomunication device, from the seat of my imaginary tractor, working my imaginary feilds.
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#4 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted June 25, 2014 - 05:51 AM

Here's a link to the weight charts for Rimguard. Looks like 88lbs. Weight on the rim or in the tire doesn't stress the axle but can stress the transmission/rearend as it adds mass and inertia to the axle. Filled tires would keep the weight lower than wheel weights if you don't 100% fill the tire. If it's 100% full then the centre would be at the axle just like with a wheel weight.

 

http://www.rimguard....es-2014-PDF.pdf


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#5 Sprint 6 OFFLINE  

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Posted June 25, 2014 - 11:25 AM

One thing to remember, liquid ballast in a tire increases its weight, but stiffens the foot print.  The bottom of the tire no longer conforms completely to the ground, this is one reason farm tractors are useless in snow.  The liquid ballast effectively makes the tire "harder", and more prone to leave ruts.  Weights squish the footprint more for more surface area of the tire to contact the ground.


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#6 BillTheTractorMan OFFLINE  

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Posted June 25, 2014 - 01:00 PM

Never fill a tire beyond 80% full with fluid. Fluid does not compress like air and needs room to expand.


Same principle works with propane tanks and fuel barrels on farms.

sent from my telecomunication device, from the seat of my imaginary tractor, working my imaginary feilds.
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