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Tire Ballast


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#16 UncleWillie ONLINE  

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Posted June 26, 2014 - 07:41 PM

This may be off topic but what are you guys hauling that you need so much weight?

Seems like everyone is obsessed with loading their tires lately?

I have turf tires and factory weights on mine and don't have any traction issues with any of my machines .........

Cars, trucks (Some that are stuck in the mud), other tractors, loaded trailers and anything else I can get a chain on.



#17 2broke2ride ONLINE  

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Posted June 27, 2014 - 04:25 PM

I want to load my power king tires (8.00-16 ags) with washer fluid, how much do you guys think I need and the big question I have is how do you guys pump the fluid I to the tires? Back when we where farming the mobile tire guy would do our big tractors and he would pump the fluid out and back in with a large air power diaphragm pump. Obviously I don't have access to one of these pumps so how do you guys do it?


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Bump......... Anyone know?


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#18 sacsr ONLINE  

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Posted June 27, 2014 - 04:29 PM

Sorry I am no help.

#19 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted June 27, 2014 - 04:31 PM

Bump......... Anyone know?


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If tubeless tires, you just remove the wheel/tire assembly, bust one bead loose, then laying it on the ground, push tire bead back and simply pour it in.  If tubed, you buy a valve stem adapter, then pump it in using almost any type of pump.  Even the drill type from Harbor Freight will do the job, but you have to release built up air pressure a few times while doing each tire.  I use a roller pump attached to an electric motor myself.



#20 UncleWillie ONLINE  

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Posted June 27, 2014 - 06:43 PM

If tubeless tires, you just remove the wheel/tire assembly, bust one bead loose, then laying it on the ground, push tire bead back and simply pour it in.  If tubed, you buy a valve stem adapter, then pump it in using almost any type of pump.  Even the drill type from Harbor Freight will do the job, but you have to release built up air pressure a few times while doing each tire.  I use a roller pump attached to an electric motor myself.

I use a hand operated transfer pump. I had to stick a smaller hose inside the bigger one to go over the valve stem.


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#21 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted June 27, 2014 - 07:02 PM

I use a hand operated transfer pump. I had to stick a smaller hose inside the bigger one to go over the valve stem.

 

Yep, I've used a hose with hose clamp over the stems too.  Just bought a new screw on hose adapter at the Evansville show almost 2 weeks back.



#22 HowardsMF155 ONLINE  

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Posted June 27, 2014 - 08:47 PM

I need to write this up and submit it for an article I suppose.

 

The cheapest and easiest way I know to put liquid ballast like washer fluid or similar is to buy a cheap one or two gallon sprayer from some place like Home Depot.  Don't install the hand wand on the sprayer, but complete all other assembly steps.   Tires can be filled while still on the tractor, but use a jack to lift the tire off the ground and take the weight off the tire.  Remove the valve core from the valve stem, allow all the air to blow out.  Push the rubber sprayer hose over the valve stem, it should fit snugly over the valve stem.  Now add your liquid to the sprayer, and pressurize the sprayer using the hand pump.  Keep an eye on the liquid level and pump up the pressure again when the liquid is halfway down.  When the liquid is all gone, carefully release the pressure from the sprayer, which will also allow the tire to "burp" all its air as well.  Repeat as needed to fill the tire.  Once the tire is full, when it is "burped" the excess fluid will drain into and be caught by the sprayer.  Alternatively, once no more air can "burp" out of the tire, a final gallon can be added and forced into the tire for maximum weight.  Some air will remain trapped in the tire to provide cushioning.  To finish the job, pull the sprayer hose off the valve stem and re-install the valve core.






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