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Hydraulic Questions


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#1 2broke2ride OFFLINE  

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Posted June 02, 2014 - 09:07 PM

So I'm thinking of building a log splitter to run off the hydraulic system on my newly aquired economy tractor. It is a 75 with FEL and three point hitch.my question is, what size cylinder will work well with this pump? my plan is to build a unit that i can just set next to the tractor and hook up two quick connect hoses and use the valve already on the tractor to save money and avoid complication. I know however from personal experience that a cylinder not properly matched to the pump capacity will give you a splitter that is totally useless. My father's work has a tractor driven splitter made from all salvage parts and the thing is very impressive looking but useless.

Thanks for any input


Edited by 2broke2ride, June 02, 2014 - 09:08 PM.


#2 Username OFFLINE  

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Posted June 03, 2014 - 09:50 AM

The hydraulic pump that was listed for your loader is 7.5 gpm at 1000 psi.The factory log splitter had nearly 9.5 gpm at 2000 psi with the factory seperate pump.Here are the specs for the splitter:

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#3 2broke2ride OFFLINE  

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Posted June 03, 2014 - 05:23 PM

The hydraulic pump that was listed for your loader is 7.5 gpm at 1000 psi.The factory log splitter had nearly 9.5 gpm at 2000 psi with the factory seperate pump.Here are the specs for the splitter:

thanks for the advice, I understand that anything i make will be limited by the pump..... that being said, I am merely interested in what I can do to make the best of what I have. I have a friend with a splitter with a guage on it and it very seldom if ever sees pressures north of 750psi in fact, I have used it and found it is normally around 500psi. I figure the 1000psi that my pump can produse should take care of 75 percent of my splitting needs as long as I properly match a cylinder to it. Does the size of the cylinder even matter to the pump? in my thinking, a bigger cylinder will move slower but produce more power per psi than a smaller one. is there any sense to that?



#4 Username OFFLINE  

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Posted June 04, 2014 - 05:27 PM

Yes a larger cylinder will be slower but have more power.I can't help you much as I don't have much experience with splitters.I use natural gas.






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