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Hydraulic Line Cleaning?


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#1 johndeereelfman OFFLINE  

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Posted May 17, 2014 - 09:31 PM

Need a little help guys. Today I worked on removing the hydraulic lines from my 1973 140H3. Although I did my best to clean the dirt and grime off the lines before cracking them loose, I feel as though I still go some dirt in the lines. So before I re-install them, I want to clean the inside of the lines out somehow. I was thinking about trying to blow some mineral spirits through the lines with the air compressor, but I'm not sure if mineral spirits will break down the hydraulic fluid enough to get the lines clean. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated, as hydraulics aren't my specialty. This 140 is a new adventure for me. 

 

I bought the tractor a couple of years ago, which was basically the frame, hydraulics, and front axle with wheels. No motor, transmission, hood or supports, and no fender pan or seat. One of our fellow members hooked me up with a 1973 140H1 that is in better shape than my 140H3, so I'm converting all of the H3 hydraulics over to the H1. I completely stripped the H3 today of all of the parts that can be dismantled, so if anybody needs some 140 parts, let me know. I want to remove the fender pan of the H1 tractor tomorrow after we get home from church and pressure wash the transmission, so hopefully I can get all of the hydraulic lines installed, the rear PTO, and re-install the fender pan. I pulled the motor from the H1 due to low compression, so I want to pull the head and see what's going on inside. I also need to disassemble the carb, clean, and rebuild with a new kit. 

 

1973 140H3:

Miscellaneous 14 399.JPG Miscellaneous 14 400.JPG Miscellaneous 14 401.JPG Miscellaneous 14 402.JPG

 

1973 140H1:

Miscellaneous 14 404.JPG Miscellaneous 14 405.JPG Miscellaneous 14 406.JPG Miscellaneous 14 407.JPG

 

I was going to completely disassemble the H1 and restore it, but since I'm planning on using this tractor for my garden work like plowing, cultivating, and rototilling, I think I'm just going to put it together and use it as is. Last thing I want to do is restore it and put it in the garage, afraid of scratching it, and having my wife get on me when I tell her I need another tractor for yard work purposes.  :(


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#2 Texas Deere and Horse OFFLINE  

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Posted May 17, 2014 - 09:57 PM

Troy, I use brake cleaner and compressed air to clean hydraulic lines out. If you plug the dirty end and spray in the other end a few seconds, you will get quite a bit of cleaner in the line then blow it out all at once. I also use brake cleaner to clean around the fittings before I break then loose and then plug them with paper towel.

 

A WORD OF WARNING to Everyone!!. Some folks own a Oxy/Acetylene Torch but not an air compressor. DO NOT use Compressed Oxygen when cleaning any kind of oil lines, It will cause a Spontaneous Explosion.


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#3 lyall OFFLINE  

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Posted May 17, 2014 - 10:04 PM

what do think about using PB blast or WD-40, carb cleaner, any thing that does not have water in it

 

if you were really careful you could use gas

gas use original used as a cleaning fluid 

I would not use gas - too dangerest 


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#4 Robert Webb OFFLINE  

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Posted May 17, 2014 - 10:17 PM

When I worked in the Hose Shop at CAT, we had "sponges" that we blew through the lines after building hoses.  They were sized so that they fit SNUG in the hoses and we used compressed air to blow them through the hoses.


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#5 Trav1s OFFLINE  

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Posted May 17, 2014 - 10:29 PM

Troy, I use brake cleaner and compressed air to clean hydraulic lines out. If you plug the dirty end and spray in the other end a few seconds, you will get quite a bit of cleaner in the line then blow it out all at once. I also use brake cleaner to clean around the fittings before I break then loose and then plug them with paper towel.

 

 

I used brake parts cleaner and carb cleaner when the first ran out.  


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#6 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted May 18, 2014 - 06:32 AM

I'd be careful of using any harsh solvents to clean the lines. If they are 40 years old like the tractor then they may be starting to deteriorate from age. If a solvent warns you about use on rubber or plastic I wouldn't use it on your lines. You might be better off simply rinsing them out with transmission fluid or hydraulic fluid. If I was going to use a solvent I'd use something mild like paint thinner.  

  I get my hoses made at a Canadian surplus/farm supply outfit called Princess Auto. They use the sponge method described above to clean every new hose before it leaves the store. A local hydraulic shop that offers that service may clean them for you for a reasonable fee. 


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#7 bgkid2966 OFFLINE  

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Posted May 18, 2014 - 08:09 AM

I would use transmission fluid to wash them out. It has a very high detergent value.

 

 

 

Geno


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#8 ckjakline OFFLINE  

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Posted May 18, 2014 - 08:25 AM

I'd be careful of using any harsh solvents to clean the lines. If they are 40 years old like the tractor then they may be starting to deteriorate from age. If a solvent warns you about use on rubber or plastic I wouldn't use it on your lines. You might be better off simply rinsing them out with transmission fluid or hydraulic fluid. If I was going to use a solvent I'd use something mild like paint thinner.  

  I get my hoses made at a Canadian surplus/farm supply outfit called Princess Auto. They use the sponge method described above to clean every new hose before it leaves the store. A local hydraulic shop that offers that service may clean them for you for a reasonable fee. 

These are  mostly steel lines other than the ones at the lift cylinder.He should be safe there.


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#9 ckjakline OFFLINE  

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Posted May 18, 2014 - 08:28 AM

Troy,

I would do like Brian said.Plug one end of the line and spray brake cleaner,gum cutter,or carb cleaner in the open end.


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