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Help me choose an air compressor for sandblasting and shop.


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#151 caseguy OFFLINE  

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Posted February 24, 2011 - 11:21 PM

The manual that Caseguy was able to get a hold of for me has a good bit of good info in it. There are a couple of models listed in the same manual. In the one section it states how they are 7.5hp, 10hp and 15hp pumps and range from 30cfm to 75cfm...


George, just FYI, The guy that I spoke with said that the units covered by the manual are all the same pump! The larger motors are just able to spin the pump faster (with larger pulleys) to achieve the different numbers. If I get hold of him tomorrow, I'll ask what pulley Dia. went with the 7.5 HP motor and (just for good measure) I'll ask about the motor RPM's and the recommended pump speed @ 7.5 HP. I'll see what I can find out about the bore and stroke dimensions as well, but if we know the original specs, that should equal the 30 cfm that the manual says.

#152 WQDL753 OFFLINE  

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Posted February 25, 2011 - 05:12 AM

I would normaly love to crunch some data for you on something like this... But I've been to busy, and to tired. So I put the referance I would have used in the misc. manuals here. Properties of materials - Manuals - Garden Tractor Talk - Forums
I had to do the whole chapter, it's secured so I couldn't copy the relevant pages, and it was to big to put here.
Anyhow, there is plenty for Y'all to ponder over in the propertys of air section.With charts and formulas that your not gonna find easily with your favorite search engine, Including hp required to compress air.
Sorry I was a lazy bum on this one...
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#153 NUTNDUN OFFLINE  

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Posted February 25, 2011 - 10:13 AM

I called the one company that kept coming up in my google searching to find out more information on this pump and it is E Compressed Air.com. I can't remember the ladies name I had spoken with but on their site they did show a ring kit for my compressor but that was it. So I called and they have the gasket kit which is $25.50 and the ring kit which is $20.50 and they have a major overhaul kit for $689.22. It shocked me that a place like that has the parts but you can't get them from Ingersoll Rand.

While I had the lady on the phone I asked her if she would happen to have any information regarding the bore and stroke and she said she has a information card they had to pull out of their library and she is going to scan it and email it to me. I will post it as soon as I get it :D

#154 NUTNDUN OFFLINE  

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Posted February 25, 2011 - 12:33 PM

She followed through and emailed me the parts list for the compressor. I will attach it to this post. The bores are 5" and 3 1/4" and the stroke is 3 1/2".

Attached Files



#155 NUTNDUN OFFLINE  

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Posted February 25, 2011 - 12:39 PM

I am going to go with a 7 1/2" pulley. It will give me 800 rpm on the compressor and 31.8 cfm piston displacement with about 23.9 usable cfm give or take a little.

#156 NUTNDUN OFFLINE  

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Posted February 25, 2011 - 06:38 PM

We stopped at Lowes on the way home and I got one 30' section of 6-2 wire and I also snagged a 12' section that was on clearance for 50% off because it was at the end of the roll.

I also borrowed the hammer drill and got 4 anchor bolts to mount the compressor. Going to clear out the corner tomorrow morning and get the holes drilled. I gotta get some sort of rubber pads from somewhere tomorrow to mount the compressor on before I bolt it tight.

I am pretty sure the motor will be here on Monday and I am not sure how long it will be till the motor starter gets here.

#157 tractormike OFFLINE  

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Posted February 25, 2011 - 08:03 PM

When you bolt the compressor down even with pads under the feet use some self locking nuts and and don't tighten the nuts down tight. The compressor needs just a little give so the vibrations from the compressor running don't crack the welds where the feet are welded to the tank.
This compressor should give you plenty of air!
Another trick is when you are running your air line where ever you are going to put an air line to use off of the main line put in a ' tee ' pipe fitting and turn the ' tee ' up so you take air off of the top. This helps if you have any moisture in the line it will tend to stay on the bottom of the pipe and not get run into the tool you are using. Put a ' tee ' in and turn the fitting down and add a foot or two of pipe and put a quarter turn ball valve on the end to act as a drip leg and a place to collect moisture and drain it off.
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#158 NUTNDUN OFFLINE  

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Posted February 25, 2011 - 08:30 PM

Here is the pulley and bushing I have picked out from Surplus Center. Definitely the cheapest prices by far on the pulleys. The pulley is 7.75" which is the closest I can find to 7 1/2" and being a double pulley.

Pulley: https://www.surplusc...r&item=1-2BKH80
Bushing: https://www.surplusc...item=1-2913-137

#159 RailmanB110 OFFLINE  

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Posted February 25, 2011 - 09:58 PM

Bingo!

#160 RailmanB110 OFFLINE  

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Posted February 26, 2011 - 09:06 AM

When you bolt the compressor down even with pads under the feet use some self locking nuts and and don't tighten the nuts down tight. The compressor needs just a little give so the vibrations from the compressor running don't crack the welds where the feet are welded to the tank.
This compressor should give you plenty of air!
Another trick is when you are running your air line where ever you are going to put an air line to use off of the main line put in a ' tee ' pipe fitting and turn the ' tee ' up so you take air off of the top. This helps if you have any moisture in the line it will tend to stay on the bottom of the pipe and not get run into the tool you are using. Put a ' tee ' in and turn the fitting down and add a foot or two of pipe and put a quarter turn ball valve on the end to act as a drip leg and a place to collect moisture and drain it off.


This is great advice!:thumbs:

Another thing I did when I ran about 200' of 3/4" in my shop was to use T's instead of couplers at most of the joints. That way, you can always add in a new drop line in the future. It's a real pain to add lines if you don't do this.
Joe
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#161 NUTNDUN OFFLINE  

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Posted February 26, 2011 - 09:12 AM

I am going to go today to get rubber mats of some sort to make for the mounting pads, I also plan on leaving the drain side about a 1/4" lower then the other side.

I think I am going to shoot for three outlets on the air piping and will accommodate for a couple more just in case. It isn't like the shop is huge so a 50' air line would make it to almost all areas of the garage. We are going to put the compressor in the left rear corner of the garage looking in. The eventual sandblast cabinet will go beside the compressor so I will have a tee fitting there and then run that pip up along the roof and drop it down near the one support pole to the left / middle of the center bay and I will have a tee fitting there as well so we would have a possible three hookups at that spot.

I also want to run a line towards the front of the garage ending with another tee fitting, so it will be easier to hook up to the air supply when using the pot sandblaster.

#162 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted February 26, 2011 - 09:59 AM

Looking forward to video of this monster blowing air!

#163 NUTNDUN OFFLINE  

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Posted February 26, 2011 - 11:30 AM

Looking forward to video of this monster blowing air!


There will be a video. I promise. Whether it works or blows up LOL.

I am sure I will have some wiring questions once we get that far.

#164 caseguy OFFLINE  

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Posted February 26, 2011 - 11:31 AM

George, Just wanted to add that in addition to the drip legs mentioned by Mike above (a great idea to be sure) I would also add a separator to the line somewhere away from the compressor. The air coming out of the tank will be hotter than the ambient air which will allow it hold onto any moisture that it contains. The further away from the tank it gets, the cooler it becomes, which allows the water to separate out more easily. You will notice that the outlet you use the most will also accumulate the most moisture which is why the drip leg at each drop is necessary. Just some thoughts from experience.
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#165 NUTNDUN OFFLINE  

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Posted February 26, 2011 - 01:29 PM

I have a question regarding the wiring for the starter box and pressure switch. Will I be able to run just the 6-2 wire from the breaker box to the compressor to the motor starter box and then from inside the motor starter feed to the motor and the pressure switch or am I going to need to run a 110 line from the breaker box also to wire to the pressure switch? I know the pressure switch is good for 220 also so I didn't know if I could feed off the lines going in for the motor or not as I am not sure how the wiring is going to be for the starter box and relay yet.




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