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Setting Up Plow


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#1 ironcub OFFLINE  

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Posted May 08, 2014 - 07:44 PM

Well I got my plow on my 1650 ih cub and tried plowing some. It went rather choppy to say the least. Im having a difficult time setting the plow up so it will roll the ground and leave a clean furrow. About all im getting done is scraping grooves in the ground.I tried many different settings and nothing changes. Does anyone have good advice on setting this brinly plow up?

#2 ironcub OFFLINE  

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Posted May 08, 2014 - 07:49 PM

This is the plow

Attached Thumbnails

  • 20140508_192639.jpg

Edited by ironcub, May 08, 2014 - 07:51 PM.

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#3 IamSherwood OFFLINE  

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Posted May 08, 2014 - 07:50 PM

Some of the best plowers in the world are here on this site.

Sorry, I'm not one of them though.

You've come to the right place to ask that question, and I bet once they're

done todays plowing, they'll be along.

Hang tight.


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#4 DH1 ONLINE  

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Posted May 08, 2014 - 07:50 PM

This is what I used to set up my Brinly Sleeve hitch plow and I had success.

Pictures from the manual.

001 (2).JPG 001.JPG


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#5 HowardsMF155 OFFLINE  

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Posted May 08, 2014 - 07:57 PM

I've been looking for Olcowhand's write-up on how to set a plow up, but can't find it.  Basically, find some lumber you can stack up till it's about 5-6 inches off the ground.  Then drive your left hand tires up on the lumber, both front and rear, and set your plow down.  The plow should be sitting up pretty straight, not cocked off to one side.  Then, you want to adjust your turnbuckle so the tip of the plow touches the ground, and the back, or heel, of the plow is between 1/2 and 1 inch off the ground.  That should set you up correctly.


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#6 Bmerf OFFLINE  

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Posted May 08, 2014 - 08:02 PM

Here it is:

http://gardentractor...bottom-plow-r29

Here's a manual:

http://gardentractor...0-cat-0-manual/

Good Luck


Edited by Bmerf, May 08, 2014 - 08:05 PM.

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#7 ironcub OFFLINE  

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Posted May 08, 2014 - 08:13 PM

Is 6 inches deep about all the more a gt and brinly plow go? I was expecting more. At times it seemed to dig nice but i never could develop a good rhythm of a nice clean furrow, at least half or more dirt chunks fell back in the furrow

#8 ironcub OFFLINE  

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Posted May 08, 2014 - 08:21 PM

The plow I have hasn't been used in a long time so it has surface rust on it. Does that surface rust hinder it from rolling the ground nice?

#9 HowardsMF155 OFFLINE  

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Posted May 08, 2014 - 08:24 PM

Is 6 inches deep about all the more a gt and brinly plow go? I was expecting more. At times it seemed to dig nice but i never could develop a good rhythm of a nice clean furrow, at least half or more dirt chunks fell back in the furrow

Generally a plow runs just about half as deep as it is wide.  So, a 10 inch plow should run about 5-6 inches deep, a 12 inch plow could do from 6-7.  If the dirt from the furrow is falling back into the furrow after the plow passes there are a few things you could try.  Speed would one, you should be moving at a brisk walking pace, about 4 mph.  If the ground was on a slope, when you tried to throw uphill it would more easily roll back down, can't help you with that one.  I think maybe plowing less deep, or adjusting the plow for a narrower slice might also help to roll the dirt on over.  


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#10 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted May 08, 2014 - 08:27 PM

All plows are set to go half their width in depth. In other words, if you have a 10" plow, you are looking at a 5" furrow...at least that's what the Mfg says.
Soil conditions will affect it, clay vs sand vs wet vs dry. It all will change your plowing.
With Ryan's plow, we have it fairly well tweaked and can usually get 5-6" deep.

My Sears will usually turn 6-7, (have measured 8 a couple of times) but I have more adjustments to tweak than a Brinly.

As for the 5-6" being not deep enough... What are you planting?
Nothing I can think of fast would have to be more than that deep...Unless its potatoes, and that depends on planting techniques.

Plow setup, that thread linked above is a good read, also follow the manual carefully.
It will do what you need and do a good job, but take the time to do all the adjustments.
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#11 Texas Deere and Horse OFFLINE  

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Posted May 08, 2014 - 08:46 PM

The plow I have hasn't been used in a long time so it has surface rust on it. Does that surface rust hinder it from rolling the ground nice?

 

Yes, rust will hurt the way a plow performs. You need to wire wheel and even polish it with a sanding disk. The dirt will slide off a slick plow much better then a rusty one.


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#12 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted May 08, 2014 - 09:40 PM

The plow I have hasn't been used in a long time so it has surface rust on it. Does that surface rust hinder it from rolling the ground nice?


I missed this post,
Yes, oh my yes.
Rust can turn a good plow into an irritating anchor you try to pull thru the ground.
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#13 The Fife Plooman ONLINE  

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Posted October 01, 2015 - 09:27 AM

Plough suck.jpg



#14 The Fife Plooman ONLINE  

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Posted October 01, 2015 - 09:29 AM



#15 The Fife Plooman ONLINE  

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Posted October 01, 2015 - 09:38 AM

Hi

Here is a picture of plough showing what is called  suck

If you do not have this because the point is worn you will end up having the plough dancing on its toes trying to get it do dig in

it will not work

Hope this helps you 

George GPlough suck.jpg

:angel:  :beer:


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