Jump to content

Nominations for Tractor of the Month
Garden Tractors and Parts on eBay



Photo
- - - - -

Farming Question


  • Please log in to reply
10 replies to this topic

#1 Reverend Blair OFFLINE  

Reverend Blair

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 1659
  • 501 Thanks
  • 952 posts
  • Location: Winnipeg

Posted January 18, 2011 - 08:52 PM

I know there are some posters from Ontario, and I assume some US members might be able to help me out here too.

Mrs. Rev just asked me how they plant and harvest tomatoes in field crops. Around here tomatoes are a bedding plant and you sure don't plant fields full of them. I have no idea how they grow tomatoes on that scale or what kind of equipment they use. I'm pretty sure it's different than growing wheat though.

So how's it done?

#2 Alc OFFLINE  

Alc

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 1094
  • 5,459 Thanks
  • 6,629 posts
  • Location: Bangor Pa

Posted January 19, 2011 - 08:38 AM

I'm not this is the answer your looking for but near my sister's house in Lancaster, Pa they plant " determinate" type tomatoes which mature in a 2 week period and then start to wilt. In rows and there picked by hand . Most of the tomatoes I plant are indeteminate which bear all season .
  • Reverend Blair said thank you

#3 dryrun OFFLINE  

dryrun

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 1559
  • 56 Thanks
  • 342 posts
  • Location: 6 miles northwest of ENGLISH, INDIANA

Posted January 19, 2011 - 09:56 AM

I'm not this is the answer your looking for but near my sister's house in Lancaster, Pa they plant " determinate" type tomatoes which mature in a 2 week period and then start to wilt. In rows and there picked by hand . Most of the tomatoes I plant are indeteminate which bear all season .


Same as here,[southern Indiana], determinate, in rows, usually with a mulch cover around stalk, still picked by hand.

Regards, George

PS around here, the fields and rows are not that long, maybe an acre or two at most.
  • Reverend Blair said thank you

#4 Reverend Blair OFFLINE  

Reverend Blair

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 1659
  • 501 Thanks
  • 952 posts
  • Location: Winnipeg

Posted January 19, 2011 - 10:09 AM

That seems like an awful lot of hand-picking when one considers the ketchup industry alone. Maybe that's the way they do it though.

#5 ducky OFFLINE  

ducky

    Senior Member

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 564
  • 1,632 Thanks
  • 3,870 posts
  • Location: Freedom, WI

Posted January 19, 2011 - 10:17 AM

Check this out.
Make short work of you garden.
Ohio Trip 090706 069.jpg
HC290 Tomato Harvester | Pik Rite Vegetable Harvesting Equipment
  • Reverend Blair said thank you

#6 dryrun OFFLINE  

dryrun

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 1559
  • 56 Thanks
  • 342 posts
  • Location: 6 miles northwest of ENGLISH, INDIANA

Posted January 19, 2011 - 10:22 AM

Harvester is bigger than my garden LOL

#7 grand OFFLINE  

grand

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 8
  • 1,632 Thanks
  • 1,909 posts
  • Location: PA

Posted January 19, 2011 - 12:06 PM

I don't know how to post video on the site but here is a link to you tube with a harvester in action
YouTube - tomato harvesting machinery in action
It still takes several people on the machine but it sure is fast.
  • Reverend Blair said thank you

#8 Reverend Blair OFFLINE  

Reverend Blair

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 1659
  • 501 Thanks
  • 952 posts
  • Location: Winnipeg

Posted January 19, 2011 - 05:58 PM

Now I can show Mrs. Rev how it's done. I think I'll ask if I can have one too...harvesting those half-dozen plants is such hard work.

#9 daytime dave OFFLINE  

daytime dave

    Live long and prosper

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 531
  • 4,485 Thanks
  • 6,353 posts
  • Location: Upstate NY

Posted January 19, 2011 - 08:52 PM

There are some commercial growers I know of who plant acres of tomato plants. They employ the hand picked method by many persons who do not seem to be local. They are migrant workers who follow the picking. They must be cheaper than those machines. It's cool to see them out working. They work hard.

#10 Reverend Blair OFFLINE  

Reverend Blair

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 1659
  • 501 Thanks
  • 952 posts
  • Location: Winnipeg

Posted January 19, 2011 - 10:28 PM

I would guess the machines get used for ketchup/sauce crops where bruising doesn't matter and the tomatoes you buy whole at the store are hand-picked.

#11 dstaggs OFFLINE  

dstaggs

    In Remembrance, RIP Dale

  • RIP
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Member No: 228
  • 553 Thanks
  • 1,781 posts
  • Location: Batesville, Arkansas

Posted January 19, 2011 - 11:11 PM

Most tomatoes that are for markets are hand picked, and they pick then almost green for shipping. The usda thinks a tomatoeis ripe when the bloom end has small white lines. I was a auctioneer for the south Arkansas tomatoes several years ago.
  • Reverend Blair said thank you




Top