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Traction Tires


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#1 projectnut OFFLINE  

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Posted April 13, 2014 - 02:26 PM

Hi everyone, it's been a while since I posted.  My old 224 seems to just get up and work so I haven't had to bug anyone about things that need repair.  I've been doing some yard work like almost everyone else and have run into a situation where I could once again use some advice.

 

I have been transporting wood, leaves and other debris in a trailer from the lower section of our yard, up a hill to the main area of the yard.  I have to go up a section of the hill that's covered with mulched hardwood bark rather than over the soft lawn.  When the bark is dry and the load is light there's no problem.  However with a heavy load, or on days when the bark is damp traction is a real problem.  When I get to a particularly steep point I either loose traction and slide to the side, or lift the front end off the ground making steering impossible.  I'm adding 150 lbs. of suitcase weights  to eliminate lifting the front end, and considering different tires and wheels to get better traction. 

 

For those of you that have similar machines, will changing from turf saver tires to traction tires help in this situation, or am I just going to dig trenches rather than slip on the wet bark?   when using my JD to do the same job (also with turf saver tires) I don't have the same problem.  The main difference is the JD has a locking differential.  I would prefer to put on a set of traction tires if that will solve the problem.  I hate to haul the JD all over the countryside if the Case is capable. 

 

Thanks, projectnut


  • olcowhand said thank you

#2 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted April 13, 2014 - 03:44 PM

Have you tried lowering the pressure in those turf tires to a point where you are getting some sidewall squat. That has worked for me in the past and makes a big difference over a hard tire. AG tires will likely be much better in that situation but unless you can find a good deal on some used rims/tires then it's big $$. 



#3 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted April 13, 2014 - 03:52 PM

Hey there PN!  Been a loong while!  Yes, ags will help tons, but do fluid fill them for some awesome traction.  No substitute for weight when it comes to traction, but then you know that.



#4 Rock farmer ONLINE  

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Posted April 13, 2014 - 06:40 PM

Maybe a set of chains would solve the problem?

Joe

#5 UncleWillie ONLINE  

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Posted April 13, 2014 - 07:37 PM

Hey there PN!  Been a loong while!  Yes, ags will help tons, but do fluid fill them for some awesome traction.  No substitute for weight when it comes to traction, but then you know that.

Then my tractor should never want for traction with my big butt perched on them,



#6 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted April 14, 2014 - 12:37 AM

I have a similar situation at my parents, just with wet grass behind the barn. Went with chains on the turfs, a little weigh in the tires and problem gone.

Once you get the chains set up, you can take them on and off pretty easy, but if you get good ones, just leave them on.
  • Rock farmer said thank you

#7 projectnut OFFLINE  

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Posted April 14, 2014 - 03:21 PM

I've lowered the air pressure to the point the tires are almost ready to roll off the rims and it still slips. The chains don't sound like a bad Idea. The only trouble is I have to cross the front lawn in a number of places to get to the drive. The topsoil is only a few inches deep covering a sandy base. I'm afraid the chains will chew up what little topsoil there is and leave me with a muddy mess.

I haven't looked into the cost of Ag tires and rims yet. I wanted to get some opinions here before I took the plunge only to find out they aren't any better than what I have. If you don't hear from me in the next few days it'll probably be because I found out the cost and either passed out or had a heart attack. There are a couple surplus places around here and hopefully they'll have something that will work without breaking the bank

#8 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted April 14, 2014 - 03:45 PM

If chains are ruled out, load the tires for traction. Can be turfs or AG's! Add extra weight to the back of the tractor.






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