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Adventures In Sheet Metal Welding.


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#16 HDWildBill ONLINE  

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Posted April 14, 2014 - 09:00 AM

I like to watch these car restoration shows and that is how they weld sheet metal, They start at one end go to maybe the middle and then the end and go back an forth.  As Walkinman1 said get your settings using a test piece.


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#17 coldone OFFLINE  

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Posted April 15, 2014 - 08:45 PM

Here is the first attempt at trying to do it the right way. I cut out a section of the bad welds and placed in a patch. I used 3/32 6013 rod and placed a spot at each corner. I then alternated between sides and corners until I had it spotted in. Then I cleaned, ground it down a little and played connect the dots.

 

I learned a few lessons here. When you place a spot, you need to hold it just a little longer to let it penetrate. I didnt do this on one side as much as the other and I had to go back and hit those areas a little more. The spot welding technique didnt not cause alot of distortion, even with going back over a few areas. It takes patiences to do it this way and fit in patches. I am thinking of starting over and just cutting out the added section and bad welds. Male the new section 10 inches and that will get me back into good metal on the hood. I just dont know what I will do at this point, but doing small patches will definately make me better at welding.

 

DSCF3053.JPG DSCF3056.JPG


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#18 IamSherwood OFFLINE  

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Posted April 15, 2014 - 09:43 PM

That patch looks good. I've been going through the same learning curve, since

I bought my Mig in mid Jan. One thing that seemed to work for me, was to hold the

nozzle at about a 15 degree angle, and farther away from the work than normal.

Pushing forward, and in a circular motion, fairly quickly.

Back in Jan, someone posted a link to a good YouTube video, of a pro patching

sheet metal. No spot filler required when he was done. Amazing work. I'll see if I

can find it.


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#19 WNYTractorTinkerer ONLINE  

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Posted April 15, 2014 - 10:09 PM

No beads!  Lower your settings and work you way around the area just makeing small spot welds to keep the heat down...  

 

Use a smaller wire like 0.023 it takes less heat to melt.

YES!  Wilbur has the solution..  Low heat and .023 wire is the solution you are looking for..  Do as Walkinman says and build the weld back in slowly to close the holes..  Heat settings have been by ear for me..  Bacon slowly sizzling is the sound you are looking for as you weld..  That means your heat is good and things are great as long as you don't linger in one spot too long & burn another hole. :wallbanging:    A gas welder is the best set up for jobs like you are doing..  No cleaning flux between passes..  So with your's you will take a little longer is all..  I've blown many holes through many many mower decks or other sheet metal (Rust evaporates instantly!) and have built things back up by making many slow deposits and letting things cool down before making another one..  Patience is the key..  **And if I can do it I'm sure you can!  

 

BTW-  The best investment you can get for welding is an auto-darkening hood.  I always burned a bunch of wayward beads while I tried to get to the are I was working with my old style hood..   :hitting_self_roller:  :brain_fart:

 

Practice makes (almost) perfect with these type of jobs..   :yeah_that:


Edited by WNYTractorTinkerer, April 15, 2014 - 10:11 PM.

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#20 TAHOE OFFLINE  

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Posted April 16, 2014 - 08:46 AM

.023 wire is great if you got gas, .030 wire is smaller flux core I've found so if using flux, stuck with the larger wire.

 

 

I am getting an old microwave from work, found a video on youtube on how to make a spot welder using the transformer, wonder how that would work :thumbs:



#21 coldone OFFLINE  

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Posted April 17, 2014 - 01:49 PM

I managed to get the gas setup yesterday. I am now using 0.025 wire with 100% argon. I got new metal and cut out the bad section totally. I got one section done last night. After grinding down the welds and smothing it out, I had a few places that didnt penetrate and left a crack. Should I reweld these from the underside or go back over them from top side where I originally welded at? I am afriad of grinding too much where I previously ground, dont want to leave a divot.



#22 coldone OFFLINE  

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Posted April 18, 2014 - 10:31 AM

I got out early this morning and started up. I had the new metal attached to the front end of the hood. I had to cut the old stuff off the back end of the hood, cut the new metal to lenght, weld the back half to the new metal, bend the curves in, and tack the sides down. So here is where It is now.

 

DSCF3057.JPG DSCF3058.JPG DSCF3059.JPG

 

 

Here is the "adventure" i cut out.

 

DSCF3060.JPG DSCF3061.JPG

 

Just a little bit of difference :D

 

I still have to complete the weld up, striaghten all the curves, and grind everything down. Hopefully I will be able to get it done this weekend.



#23 UncleWillie ONLINE  

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Posted April 18, 2014 - 11:33 AM

I am great at weldign sheet metal here is how I do it. 

 

 

1. Measure and remeasure.

2. Make a template.

3 Take it to someone who knows what they are doing.

 

 

Works perfect every time.


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#24 HDWildBill ONLINE  

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Posted April 18, 2014 - 01:49 PM

I'm far from any kind of expert on welding but it doesn't look bad to me.


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#25 coldone OFFLINE  

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Posted April 18, 2014 - 08:18 PM

I am great at weldign sheet metal here is how I do it. 

 

 

1. Measure and remeasure.

2. Make a template.

3 Take it to someone who knows what they are doing.

 

 

Works perfect every time.

 

 

1: Well I got the measure and remeasure down this time.

 

2: (In my best mexican outlaw voice) We dont need no stinking template

 

3: But then I dont get as much shop time, cant have that.


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#26 Walkinman1 OFFLINE  

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Posted April 20, 2014 - 08:01 AM

Coldone, check out the link in this thread: http://gardentractor...-metal-working/

 

 

For the areas where the cracks reappeared:  I would re-weld from the top as it means you didn't get enough penetration on the initial weld pass.

 

As for the grinding I'll try to describe what I do:  I use my pneumatic cut off wheel to knock of the top of the weld, hold it perpendicular to the bead and just lightly work it back and forth til it's close to the height of the surrounding metal.  It's a small cut off wheel, maybe 2.5" or so and it's much easier to handle than an angle grinder as you can modulate the speed and the small wheel seems less likely to contact the surrounding metal. After that I finish it off with my die grinder and a 2" sanding disc (gently!).  As with the welding take it slow because the grinding can put enough heat into the steel to warp it. 

 

Hopefully this helps you out, BTW it's looking much better so far!


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#27 Utah Smitty OFFLINE  

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Posted April 29, 2014 - 11:10 AM


 

BTW-  The best investment you can get for welding is an auto-darkening hood.  I always burned a bunch of wayward beads while I tried to get to the are I was working with my old style hood..   :hitting_self_roller:  :brain_fart:

 

  :yeah_that:

 

I agree.  I bought a $45 HF Auto Darkening hood several years ago and it's still going strong.  One thing I noticed, which may only be particular to the HF hoods is that I can't weld in very low light or at dusk, etc.  For some reason the lens takes longer to react and I get a flash of bright light.

 

Now, if they only made welding hood swith bifocals--pretty hard to put a good bead on something when your head is cocked to one side and one eye is looking through the upper part of the lens and the other eye through the bifocal part... makes me dizzy...

 

Smitty


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#28 coldone OFFLINE  

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Posted April 29, 2014 - 06:19 PM

I am pretty near sighted and I have a HF auto darkening helmet too. I had to take my glasses off and get up close to where I can see. I think its about time for bifocals. Near sighted, astigmatism, and over 40, my eyes are becoming a PITA but at least I still have them.



#29 Utah Smitty OFFLINE  

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Posted April 29, 2014 - 11:23 PM

.023 wire is great if you got gas, .030 wire is smaller flux core I've found so if using flux, stuck with the larger wire.

 

 

I am getting an old microwave from work, found a video on youtube on how to make a spot welder using the transformer, wonder how that would work :thumbs:

I'd just go buy one of the 110 V or 220 V ones from Harbor Freight.  I bought one slightly used from a guy.  The pins holding the jaws were sloppy, but I found that 5/16" steel rod was a good fit.  I cut the 3 pins to length--leaving about 3/8" in each side. I then checked them in a drill press and used a hacksaw to cut a groove in each end for the snap rings.  Assembled and it works like a charm.  The welder is a Miller knockoff, and the Miller tips work in the clamp...

 

Smitty


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#30 TAHOE OFFLINE  

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Posted April 30, 2014 - 08:12 AM

I am pretty near sighted and I have a HF auto darkening helmet too. I had to take my glasses off and get up close to where I can see. I think its about time for bifocals. Near sighted, astigmatism, and over 40, my eyes are becoming a PITA but at least I still have them.

 

I am the same way. Seems I have to put my face right up against my work to see what I'm welding. Sucks trying to weld exhaust on the vehicles when I can't see what I am doing.

 

I'd just go buy one of the 110 V or 220 V ones from Harbor Freight.  I bought one slightly used from a guy.  The pins holding the jaws were sloppy, but I found that 5/16" steel rod was a good fit.  I cut the 3 pins to length--leaving about 3/8" in each side. I then checked them in a drill press and used a hacksaw to cut a groove in each end for the snap rings.  Assembled and it works like a charm.  The welder is a Miller knockoff, and the Miller tips work in the clamp...

 

Smitty

 

But then what fun would that be buying one?  LOL. 

I still haven't be given the microwave for parts so may not happen anyway. Like I got time anyway to work on a project other than remodeling a house.






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