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Pulley Help - Can't Remove From Crank Shaft


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#1 mattsse OFFLINE  

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Posted April 03, 2014 - 05:34 PM

Hi all, in my previous post:

 

http://gardentractor...al/#entry437466

 

I asked for help removing the PTO without damaging it, now I've made it to the last pulley and it's bugger.  I tried my gear puller and it started to bend so I stopped, I got a gear puller per the above post and it wouldn't budge an inch and the whole pulley is bending a bit.  If I do any more bending to this thing I'll need to replace it.  Before I cut this thing off and buy a new one can anyone provide me with any ideas?

 

Here's what I've tried so far:

 

- Two days soak with liquid wrench

- one day soak with 50/50 atf/acetone

- Heated it up with a torch

- Gear puller

- Pulley puller

 

I'd love to salvage the pulley and not damage the shaft.  Here's a picture of the pulley puller I have:

 

http://www.princessa...r-Set/8309619.p

 

It's very tight on that size pulley.

 

Thanks so much!

 

Matt



#2 New.Canadian.DB.Owner OFFLINE  

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Posted April 03, 2014 - 06:09 PM

I have had good luck using chainsaw gas to remove rusted parts.  Gas goes through the smallest of pinholes, runs up hill, and will pull the two-stroke oil with it.  Let it sit for a couple of hours with frequent re-wetting.  Not a fan of applying heat immediately thereafter.


Edited by New.Canadian.DB.Owner, April 03, 2014 - 06:09 PM.

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#3 Bmerf OFFLINE  

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Posted April 03, 2014 - 06:15 PM

Patience.

A couple of things to try; with pressure on the puller, tap (hit) the center screw of puller with hammer. Tighten a little more, not so much as to bend pulley. repeat, did it move? No? Leave pressure on puller, soak again, leave over night. Try to tighten, not to much, tap screw again, did it move? No? Leave presure on puller, soak again. Repeat.

I know this may sound weird, but it worked for me on a electric clutch like yours. Took over a week with pressure applied. I came out to the garage one day, the thing had loosened itself and tightening the puller removed it completely with almost no pressure.

Why did it work? The constant pressure with soaking? The application of mechanical agitation? Vibration from train tracks? Gremlins? Rogue Alien mechanics? I don't know, but it did work! Your milage may very.

 

Again Patience! You do not want to screw this up and buy another one.(expensive) Once removed do yourself a favor and use anti-seize at replacement.


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#4 mattsse OFFLINE  

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Posted April 03, 2014 - 06:20 PM

Patience.

A couple of things to try; with pressure on the puller, tap (hit) the center screw of puller with hammer. Tighten a little more, not so much as to bend pulley. repeat, did it move? No? Leave pressure on puller, soak again, leave over night. Try to tighten, not to much, tap screw again, did it move? No? Leave presure on puller, soak again. Repeat.

I know this may sound weird, but it worked for me on a electric clutch like yours. Took over a week with pressure applied. I came out to the garage one day, the thing had loosened itself and tightening the puller removed it completely with almost no pressure.

Why did it work? The constant pressure with soaking? The application of mechanical agitation? Vibration from train tracks? Gremlins? Rogue Alien mechanics? I don't know, but it did work! Your milage may very.

 

Again Patience! You do not want to screw this up and buy another one.(expensive) Once removed do yourself a favor and use anti-seize at replacement.

 

Thanks, I'll give it a go, it's already slightly bent but I can still bend it back.  I have a big container of anti-seize waiting to get put on there.  It's like there's the pulley and then some kind of ring just before the pulley.  Also that puller tends to push down on the outside edges of the pulley simply because you have to run the bolts through the holes.  If I had something that pulled right at the shaft I would probably have a better chance at getting it off without damaging it.

 

Matt



#5 Bmerf OFFLINE  

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Posted April 03, 2014 - 06:26 PM

Do you have access to a torch and welder? If so, you could cut some 1/4 " metal to form the perfect custom puller attachment. Function over form, would not need to be pretty, just effective.


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#6 mattsse OFFLINE  

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Posted April 03, 2014 - 06:33 PM

Do you have access to a torch and welder? If so, you could cut some 1/4 " metal to form the perfect custom puller attachment. Function over form, would not need to be pretty, just effective.

 

I have a couple welders, I was thinking of making something.  I just saw something where someone welded steel right to the pulley, used that to yank it off then just ground off the welds.  I wonder if I could do that and salvage the pulley?  I have a mig welder and could probably to that pretty easily.

 

Matt



#7 mattsse OFFLINE  

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Posted April 03, 2014 - 06:41 PM

Do you have access to a torch and welder? If so, you could cut some 1/4 " metal to form the perfect custom puller attachment. Function over form, would not need to be pretty, just effective.

 

I also someone drill a couple holes in the pulley and run bolts through the holes then use the pulley puller on those bolts.


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#8 Bmerf OFFLINE  

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Posted April 03, 2014 - 06:42 PM

I don't think welding is wise, maybe as a last resort. After looking at your pictures, I believe that piece was cast on my machine. Not good welding and doesn't like heat. Soft and cracks easily. That is why it is best not to be in a hurry.

 

I also someone drill a couple holes in the pulley and run bolts through the holes then use the pulley puller on those bolts.

This would be a better idea.


Edited by Bmerf, April 03, 2014 - 06:43 PM.

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#9 framesteer OFFLINE  

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Posted April 03, 2014 - 06:47 PM

A reminder for anyone welding on any assembly that contains ball and/or roller bearings.  Keep the ground wire for the welder as close as possible to the welder electrode.  If you have any ball or roller bearings in the electrical path between the welder electrode and the welder ground, you run the risk of damaging the bearings.  In this case, put the ground on the pulley, not on the tractor frame.


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#10 Bmerf OFFLINE  

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Posted April 03, 2014 - 06:49 PM

Oh, and don't forget to put the retaining bolt in the crankshaft without the washer. Don't want to screw up your threads with the puller. BTDT :wallbanging:


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#11 mattsse OFFLINE  

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Posted April 03, 2014 - 07:09 PM

A reminder for anyone welding on any assembly that contains ball and/or roller bearings.  Keep the ground wire for the welder as close as possible to the welder electrode.  If you have any ball or roller bearings in the electrical path between the welder electrode and the welder ground, you run the risk of damaging the bearings.  In this case, put the ground on the pulley, not on the tractor frame.

 

That's some good advice, I never thought of that - Thanks!



#12 mattsse OFFLINE  

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Posted April 03, 2014 - 07:10 PM

Oh, and don't forget to put the retaining bolt in the crankshaft without the washer. Don't want to screw up your threads with the puller. BTDT :wallbanging:

 

That's a good tip too, I've been putting a socket over the end of the puller even though it doesn't look like it could get in and damage the threads.


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#13 propane1 OFFLINE  

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Posted April 03, 2014 - 07:23 PM

Great advise. I learned some thing. Putting shock to it while having pulling pressure on it is the best thing. I use that a lot. Using mixed gas is a great idea. Because gas will creep into small places. Thanks, Noel

#14 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted April 03, 2014 - 07:27 PM

Makes me wonder if an air chisel with blunt tip was buzzed against the bolt of the puller if it wouldn't jar it loose.  This kind in pic below:

 

air chisel.jpg

 

 

 



#15 Walkinman1 OFFLINE  

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Posted April 03, 2014 - 07:49 PM

Daniel: Yes, it does sometimes help. The hard part is keeping the bit from walking away from wherever you put it. It's a little gentler than a hammer I guess but I've alternated between the two as well with good results.




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