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#1 Likesspace OFFLINE  

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Posted March 30, 2014 - 07:27 PM

Well today I got to spend a lot of time working on the implements.

First of all I finished tearing down the cultivator and did some more welding on the wheels. Just mainly filling some rust holes and grinding back down. I also got everything freed up and greased up and then re-assembled.

 

After finishing the cultivator I then went to work on the plow.

Some genius decided that it would be a good idea to paint over rust so nothing is going easy on this piece of equipment.

I've been trying to get the cradle rollers off of the plow and am now down to one that is left. These things were so frozen onto the plow that I had to use heat to get some of them off.

The last one is battling me the entire way but I've got it about halfway off. It got to the point that I had zero grip left in my hands so I dropped the channel locks for the night and will try again tomorrow. 

 

I also took a grinder and wire wheel to the mold board, share and land slide. Same situation where the previous owner had painted over rust.

I worked on that part for well over an hour and am finally down to bare metal. It's not the mirror finish that I remember our farm plows being but that should come after it's been worked for awhile. At least I hope so. 

 

I then coated everything with a good layer of grease and called it a night. 

I've decided that using my "winter muscles" in spring does not make for an easy day.

 

All in all it's been a good weekend.

I have two implements ready to go and one more that is well on it's way to being there.

Hopefully by next weekend I'll be able to do some adjustments on the plow and disc and give them a try.


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#2 Alc ONLINE  

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Posted March 30, 2014 - 07:34 PM

Your rollers are rusted on mine are so worn you can put a 5/8" bolt through them lol  Good luck


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#3 Cat385B ONLINE  

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Posted March 30, 2014 - 07:42 PM

:camera: :camera: ????????????


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#4 New.Canadian.DB.Owner OFFLINE  

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Posted March 30, 2014 - 08:00 PM

I have a spare set of rollers, if anyone needs them.  Cheap plus shipping.

 

rollers 1.jpg

 


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#5 DJ54 OFFLINE  

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Posted March 30, 2014 - 08:24 PM

For a good rust penetrating oil, mix Acetone & ATF in a 50/50 mixture. Relatively cheap to make, and works better than the top of the line stuff. Use an empty dish washing detergent bottle as your squirt bottle, and snap the top on. If not, the Acetone will evaporate. You will need to shake the bottle if it sets a while, as it will separate. 

 

 Works best if you can give things a shot a couple days ahead of time, and give it a shot once a day, up until time to start working on it. Good stuff..!!

 

  I had a set of rollers frozen up on a set of cultivators I bought off ebay locally. Soaked them a couple days ahead, and cotter pins & rollers turned, & removed easily when I went to work on them. 


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#6 trowel OFFLINE  

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Posted March 30, 2014 - 08:37 PM

Sounds good, little by little.

 

Throw up some pics if you got them, we love seeing the projects unfold before our eyes :thumbs:


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#7 UncleWillie ONLINE  

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Posted March 30, 2014 - 08:43 PM

Sounds like a productive day. Post up some pics.


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#8 Likesspace OFFLINE  

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Posted March 30, 2014 - 08:49 PM

Thanks for the tip on penetrating oil. I've been using a product called Gibbs which is the best penetrating spray I've ever tried. So far it's not breaking the grip this roller has on the shaft but it has worked wonders on all of those square head nuts and bolts that probably haven't moved in the last 50 years or so.

I'll have to give the acetone/atf a try. I've always heard that transmission fluid is a great penetrant. 

 

Also, I'll honestly try to get some pics up within a couple of days. 

The only implements left in the garage are the cultivator and plow. I moved the disc back out to the farm earlier today but totally forgot about taking photos of the disc, snow blade or the tractor.

As long as it's not raining I have a ton of stuff to do out at the farm this week so I'm sure I'll make at least one if not two trips, after work.

I promise to try to remember to snap some pics while I'm out there to show you all what I'm starting with.

 

Even though my hands, back, and legs are killing me I've really enjoyed working on this old equipment. I have decided that I need to invest in a respirator if I'm going to keep wire brushing the rust and dirt because right now my lungs feel like I'm about midway through a chest cold. Other than that I honestly hate to see the weekend come to a close.


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#9 trowel OFFLINE  

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Posted March 30, 2014 - 09:04 PM

Oh yes, do please get a respirator of some kind, the rust dust will hurt you after a while, please, do not sand blast or wire brush with out one.


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#10 Likesspace OFFLINE  

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Posted March 31, 2014 - 08:05 PM

Trowel....

 

After the last couple of days I'm thinking that a respirator is a must have item.

Today I had a few periods of chills and just felt like I had a major chest cold. Thankfully tonight my chest is starting to loosen up so it looks like my body is fighting off the infection.

 

I also wanted to let you know that the hitch bar actually arrived at my work address on Saturday.

When I got to work today I went out to get the mail and couldn't believe that it had already arrived. 

I'm actually glad that I didn't know it was in. If so I would have grabbed it and given the plow a try even though the moldboard had a very thick coat of red paint, (as well as the coulter), and the cradle rollers were locked up.

 

Over the weekend I did a lot of reading and talking to my dad about proper use of a moldboard plow. We were just getting out of using a plow when I stopped farming so I didn't know much about them.

Well thanks to the information found on the internet and advice from my dad I now have mine ready to go to the field.

 

Tonight I got the coulter cleaned up and greased well. Also cleaned the share, landslide and heel. I lightly sharpened the coulter and the share, (making sure to stay away from the point), and got the final roller off and cleaned up and greased.

 

One question that I do have is how long does it take to get the moldboard and coulter to "scour" once you start plowing?

I know dad said that he would always set a farm plow to a shallow setting and then take off across the field at just a little slower than road gear. He said that would scour one pretty fast but of course I can't do that with the DB.

 

Would it help to either use a flap disc on the moldboard or mix up some sand and soil and try to polish it before taking it to the field?

 

My dad and brother are both pretty doubtful about how well one of these walking tractors can plow and quite honestly...I want to prove them wrong. Because of that I'd like to be able to pull into one of the fields and after making some adjustments be turning a nice furrow.

 

Thanks and hope everyone had a great day.


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#11 trowel OFFLINE  

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Posted March 31, 2014 - 09:02 PM

Ok, yes, flap disk the moldboard and share, polish it also of you could.

When i was though how to plow it was on a horse drawn two way sulky plow, after fall plowing the plow was coated in used motor oil and put up for the winter, in the spring the plows moldboard and share was soaked with engine degreaser or dish soap, then spray washed, dried and sanded until smooth bare metal shown, then the back furrow was tuned in to finish scouring the plow and make fine tuneing to the suctions and hitch length.

It does not take very long at all with a 6 inch plow, If your soil is clay then yes you really want it polished from the get go, if it is sandy loam then it should not be too much of a bother, the sand and rocks will finish it for you.

 

Some farmers drag the plow through gravel topolish the point but i always worry about catching the share point on a rock, snapped two points so far from rocks, i live in the mountains.

 

I don't want you to become discouraged, i may not be the best person to ask seeing as have used a walk behind and rider for many years so it is easy for me to tell you what and how to do things but the fact of the matter is experience is everything and this is your first time, the first of everything is the hardest, i would be doing well by you to advise practicing in a spot first, humble yourself, go at a easy pace and let the tractor tell you what needs to be done.

 

Mark off the first furrow with string and wood stakes, go slow, it is not a race, govern the engine at a good speed, doe not need to scream, it is a 3 hp so the power is there, the first furrow won't be the deepest and best but keep it straight, the following furrows will get better, don't make any adjustments to the plow until the third furrow, if too deep the wheel will spin out and tractor bog down hard, your only plowing about 4 to 5 inches deep, crank up on the plow handle two or three turns and fine tune it with each furrow, it will be quick and you will know when it is right, at the end of the furrow pull up on the handbars, don't stop, do it while the tractor is moving or it will be a PIA to pull it back and out of the sod.

Your goal is to lay the sod over right back into the freshly plowed furrow, if it cuts more then the share is wide you have too much suction and the draft is off, adjust the right wheel inwards another inch or so, you want the right wheel to ride perfetly in the fresh furrow not riding up and out of the furrow or on the next furrow.

Too little bottom suction and your only cutting sod at the roots, should be up to 5 inches deep depending on the soil type.

Take the soil and ball it up in your hand, if it sticks together in a tight ball and is wet, don't plow, it is too wet, if you ball it up and it crumbles to sand it is way too dry, you would have to point the plow share to China and drag it, if it holds it's form, little moist but falls apart when rubbed between the hands, it's ready to plow.

fresh sod is always a little harder and requires less bottem suction then old fields, you can go a little deeper when you plow over the fall trash.

 

In the end speed comes from experience and practice, go easy and have fun, when it is done you will walk away either hating it or feeling fulfilled and ready for disking.

 

Jesse


Edited by trowel, March 31, 2014 - 09:07 PM.

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#12 coldone OFFLINE  

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Posted March 31, 2014 - 09:46 PM

Just to add to the above. I dont hesitate to run the disc over it if I screwed up plowing. I will disc it and then plow again. I had to do that several times when I started to learn to plow.


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#13 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted March 31, 2014 - 10:09 PM

Glad you're making headway. Good to hear.
Penetrating oils from best to worst IMHO
ATF/Acetone tied with Aero Kroil
Liquid Wrench
Gibbs
PB blaster
Kerosene
Oil
Water
Vinegar
Salt water
Portland cement
WD 40

I'm kidding about the last ones, but the only viable use I've ever found for WD40 is to remove stickers easier.
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#14 coldone OFFLINE  

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Posted April 01, 2014 - 05:48 AM

I have become a firm believer in Rust buster. I have used it and this stuff did some incredible stuff to frozen parts.

 

http://www.zorotools...CFUoV7AodlEkAXA


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#15 New.Canadian.DB.Owner OFFLINE  

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Posted April 01, 2014 - 04:57 PM

Trowel covered it perfectly.  I plowed with a DB last year & it was great fun, once you let it be fun.  The only thing I would add is remove the coulter wheel unless you are plowing sod.  Cutting sod is about the only job of the coulter wheel. If it the ground has been cultivated recently, the plow will do the job without the coulter wheel.  Oh, and don't loss the wheel once you remove it.  


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