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#1 DH1 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 15, 2011 - 06:59 PM

Liquid tire ballast, I'm in the process of loading 2 sets of tires and discovered some interesting stuff. I bought some RV anti freeze in 9.46lt jugs about 2 1/2 us gal.
They weigh 19-20 lbs each.
Water weighs 20-21 lbs in the same jug tried to get the same level.

I also picked up some calcium flakes from work and mixed up 1 jug, about 10lbs per jug.
Mixed calcium weighs 27-28 lbs in the same jug same level.
I knew calcium was heavier but not that much.
So the RV goes in my 23x8.5x12s and the calcium goes in my 6x12s AGs since there a smaller tire, don't hold as much fluid, I want to get as much weight in them as I can.
Both sets of tires have tubes in them.
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#2 101 senior OFFLINE  

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Posted January 15, 2011 - 07:08 PM

very interesting. I always wondered about that

#3 DH1 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 15, 2011 - 08:58 PM

Just weighed my 23x8.50x12 got 31lbs each of RV anti freeze in them, filled to the valve stem.
If I had of used calcium I would of got 40lbs in them.
On to the 6x12s.
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#4 DH1 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 15, 2011 - 09:55 PM

Just finished 1 of the 6x12s and I got 28lbs of calcium in it. Filled to the valve stem.
If I had of used RV anti freeze it would of been 20, 21lbs.

The turf tires are new, the 6x12 AGs are in like new condition, both sets have new tubes, chances of having a flat are minimal, not like if they were 20 yr old tires. Should of put calcium in the turfs, the extra weight is what this is all about.
Time to finish the last one.

#5 DH1 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 15, 2011 - 10:52 PM

All done job finished, I kept one of my new yrs resolutions.
BTW did you know when you mix water and calcium flakes you get heat, the stuff gets hot.

#6 mjodrey OFFLINE  

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Posted January 16, 2011 - 06:24 AM

You kept one of your new years resolutions,I would say you are probably farther ahead of the game than most of us then.LOL

#7 poncho62 ONLINE  

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Posted January 16, 2011 - 06:52 AM

I used straight RV antifreeze in mine.......no tubes....apparently, RV antifreeze will not rust rims like windshield washer fluid will....and is non toxic if spilled.

#8 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted January 16, 2011 - 09:14 AM

I don't use calcium even in our farm tractor tires. Just too many problems when using it. No matter what, sooner or later some solution gets past the tubes & rots the rims. One main reason is the hassle of pumping the stuff out when having to change a tire on the large tractors, so we just add weights to the hubs. Our large tractors have a 1,000lb cast weight on each wheel. I use 20% methanol, with 60% water, and 20% antifreeze in my GT's.

#9 DH1 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 16, 2011 - 09:27 AM

True or False
I have been told a few times that calcium in tires that do not have tubes will only rust the rim if the rim is exposed to air.
In other words if the rim is submerged 100% in calcium it will not rust.
True or False???

#10 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted January 16, 2011 - 09:41 AM

I would have to say false, but I may be wrong. The calcium is dissolved in water, and water contains oxygen.....all required ingredients for rust. After all, ships hulls are submerged, and they rust!

#11 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted January 16, 2011 - 10:17 AM

As far as your rims go, consider CaCl to be "The Andromeda Strain". It's harmless until it gets out of it's container.

Ships hulls do rust, but at a much slower rate. Look at the Titanic. The rust starts in earnest as soon as you get the stuff in contact with air. The first fatality is usually the area around the Schrader Valve. When a leak occurs, some of the mix will find it's way there. There is no stopping it once it starts. You may be able to slow it down, but never stop it. Dad stopped using CaCl after the 2nd set of rims had to be replaced. I think we still have a plastic drum or 2 of the stuff around in the lower shop. It'll stay there. I'll stick with anti-freeze, washer fluid, and wheel weights.

#12 Deerlope ONLINE  

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Posted January 16, 2011 - 05:39 PM

Calcuim is considered a hazardous substance, if the wrong people see it leaking you could have a big problem on your hands. Also any garage that really knows what they are doing will refuse to change or repair a tire that has it in it or they will charge extra to do it. myself, I use Rim Guard

Edited by Deerlope, January 16, 2011 - 05:40 PM.
added wording


#13 DH1 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 16, 2011 - 05:46 PM

Well, even though it's heavier than RV anti freeze or WWF I think I'll stay away from it, only reason I put it in the 1 set of 6x12s is I wanted as much weight in them as I could get. I used about 6 us gal total.
They say RimGaurd is just as heavy as calcium but I've never seen it around these parts.
Time to see if I can find some cast iron wheel weights.
Live and learn.

#14 thirdroc17 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 16, 2011 - 07:17 PM

I've been around loaded tires of one kind or another for 50 years. I have YET to see a tire loaded with calcium come off anything but a severely rusted wheel. For one thing, you can't fill it full, there is air in there. Even with a tube, some is going to leak when the fill valve does on and off.

One other thing to consider, sooner or later, you're gonna fill you nice new pressure gauge with the stuff, not to mention that little drop the escapes every time you check the air and works it's way between the tube and wheel. Even the gauges supposedly designed to check loaded tires only work about a year, and the corrosion ends their life.

I've always found fluid tires to ride rougher, even with air space left.

Nope, I'll NEVER put anything into a tire again except air! With one possible exception. I've been hearing about a poly fill that's not solid. Acts just like air, yet, never goes flat regardless of how many thorns, nails, screws, you may pick up. Down side, it's expensive as all get out, and I doubt you'll ever mount that tire to a different wheel.

#15 TUDOR OFFLINE  

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Posted January 24, 2011 - 04:16 AM

I'm not a fan of tubes after tearing out the valve stems on 2 of them on my MF12H in less than a month and dumping my calcium in the driveway. Went back to tubeless and no more probem that way. The rims have a life expectancy of 12 to 14 years if you don't use tubes with calcium.

There is a similar product to RimGuard available in Canada for about $3 / U.S. Gal. About the same weight as the calcium you mixed up, which was a little light, BTW.




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