Jump to content

Nominations for Tractor of the Month
Garden Tractors and Parts on eBay



Photo
- - - - -

"where Are All The Tractors Going . . . "


  • Please log in to reply
16 replies to this topic

#1 GlenPettit OFFLINE  

GlenPettit
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 34353
  • 520 Thanks
  • 143 posts
  • Location: MI (South of Lansing)

Posted March 26, 2014 - 08:14 AM


Just read an article in "Farm & Ranch magazine" from a guy in Tallahassee, FL:  

He noticed three semi- loads of old tractors, with many garden tractors and implements being loaded onto a large oceangoing freighter at a small private dock in Panama Beach, FL this past Fall.  

When he asked the dock manager about it; "was told the ship came in to port every three months with a load of steel pipe from and made in Colombia, and then returns to Colombia with a load of scrap paper in the hold and 3 or 4 loads of farm equipment strapped on the deck.

A guy in Alabama buys old tractors, implements and garden tractors all across the South and then sells them for a good markup in South America.  The South Americans don't want anything with modern electronics; they want heavier-stronger older tractors and implements that they can fix and make parts for themselves.  Over the last 10 years, there have been thousands of old tractors shipped from here to South America. After being reasonably restored in Columbia, they are shipped to neighboring countries down there and maintained by the farmers that will continue to use them."

 

And now we know where all the Tractors down South are disappearing!

 

Glen


  • MH81, Alc, hamman and 7 others have said thanks

#2 SamMC OFFLINE  

SamMC
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 30776
  • 208 Thanks
  • 171 posts
  • Location: Little Rock, Ar.

Posted March 26, 2014 - 08:19 AM

I hope they use them to good ends. Maybe we Americans do not appreciate some of the really good things that we have.


  • hamman, JD DANNELS, HowardsMF155 and 6 others have said thanks

#3 IamSherwood OFFLINE  

IamSherwood

    Elf guardian

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 2066
  • 8,379 Thanks
  • 7,696 posts
  • Location: Northern Ontario

Posted March 26, 2014 - 08:32 AM

Sounds like they're doing what we should be doing more of, here in

North America. Repurposing, rather than supporting an offshore economy, namely

China. I'm sure their reason for doing this is most likely driven by money.

 They simply can't afford new stuff.

Better than having it go in the scrap bin.


  • Bolens 1000, wilberj, daytime dave and 12 others have said thanks

#4 hamman OFFLINE  

hamman

    Homelite Owner Extraordinaire

  • Senior Member
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 1733
  • 5,628 Thanks
  • 2,583 posts
  • Location: Michigan

Posted March 26, 2014 - 08:52 AM

 

Just read an article in "Farm & Ranch magazine" from a guy in Tallahassee, FL:  

He noticed three semi- loads of old tractors, with many garden tractors and implements being loaded onto a large oceangoing freighter at a small private dock in Panama Beach, FL this past Fall.  

When he asked the dock manager about it; "was told the ship came in to port every three months with a load of steel pipe from and made in Colombia, and then returns to Colombia with a load of scrap paper in the hold and 3 or 4 loads of farm equipment strapped on the deck.

A guy in Alabama buys old tractors, implements and garden tractors all across the South and then sells them for a good markup in South America.  The South Americans don't want anything with modern electronics; they want heavier-stronger older tractors and implements that they can fix and make parts for themselves.  Over the last 10 years, there have been thousands of old tractors shipped from here to South America. After being reasonably restored in Columbia, they are shipped to neighboring countries down there and maintained by the farmers that will continue to use them."

 

And now we know where all the Tractors down South are disappearing!

 

Glen

 

 

THe sentence about Sout Americans not wanting anything with electronics has a lot to say about what we should be thinking here in America.   Look at Mexico and other countries that still run American cars and trucks from the 40s,50,and 60s.  Think about it. JM2CW.                                 Roger. 


  • JD DANNELS, trowel, boyscout862 and 4 others have said thanks

#5 boyscout862 ONLINE  

boyscout862
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 8923
  • 9,769 Thanks
  • 7,536 posts
  • Location: N.E. Connecticut

Posted March 26, 2014 - 09:09 AM

They are being way more green(money and environmentally). Maintaining and using older equipment is much more economical and environmentally friendly than buying new stuff every few years.

 

The 1% has really got the public fooled about alot of things when they put a "green" label on it. Those compact flourescents are a mercury nightmare. I suspect they used more energy to make than they save because mine last only the same amount of time as the old incandescents. The new cleaner equipment aren't really that clean when you factor in the short life and the energy to manufacture and transport them.

 

I consider it all part of the dumbing down of The United States of America. The schools are a big part of the problem as they all have "zero intelligence" policies and "core programs" written by idiots.

 

Keeping our old GTs and equipment is a hold on sanity that can help teach our children a bit of reality. Good Luck, Rick

 

Years ago, NY State required all graduating high school students to take a standard test and to pass it. One year, the high school teachers were required to take it too. Over 1500 teachers failed the test. They had already started the dumbing down and it has continued since. 


Edited by boyscout862, March 26, 2014 - 09:21 AM.

  • Bolens 1000, Alc, hamman and 10 others have said thanks

#6 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

JD DANNELS

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 2011
  • 3,786 Thanks
  • 3,907 posts
  • Location: Newton.Ia

Posted March 26, 2014 - 10:00 AM

It is difficult for us to concieve the advantages we take for granted do not exist in much of the world.

That 560 International that was a real tractor in the 60's . Is now considered a small chore tractor by farmers today(or is sitting unused)?

To those people in Central and South America thant same tractor is a big step up from horses and oxen or manual labor.

I'm glad to see someone getting the use from them maybe it will improve their lives.


  • Alc, hamman, trowel and 6 others have said thanks

#7 boyscout862 ONLINE  

boyscout862
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 8923
  • 9,769 Thanks
  • 7,536 posts
  • Location: N.E. Connecticut

Posted March 26, 2014 - 11:51 AM

It is difficult for us to concieve the advantages we take for granted do not exist in much of the world.

That 560 International that was a real tractor in the 60's . Is now considered a small chore tractor by farmers today(or is sitting unused)?

To those people in Central and South America thant same tractor is a big step up from horses and oxen or manual labor.

I'm glad to see someone getting the use from them maybe it will improve their lives.

Well put. There is alot of our older technology that could help other places. Simple and reliable is necessary for economical help to others. Our old well made tractors are also much simpler to repair.

 

I am dissappointed that water rams, windpumps, windgenerators, and solar electric isn't used more by our agencies that help other countries. Alot of our military surplus equipment would help too. Good Luck, Rick 


Edited by boyscout862, March 26, 2014 - 11:52 AM.

  • hamman, oldedeeres, SamMC and 1 other said thanks

#8 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

JD DANNELS

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 2011
  • 3,786 Thanks
  • 3,907 posts
  • Location: Newton.Ia

Posted March 26, 2014 - 03:40 PM

Well put. There is alot of our older technology that could help other places. Simple and reliable is necessary for economical help to others. Our old well made tractors are also much simpler to repair.

 

I am dissappointed that water rams, windpumps, windgenerators, and solar electric isn't used more by our agencies that help other countries. Alot of our military surplus equipment would help too. Good Luck, Rick 

Yes old technology is sometimes state of the art in 3rd world countries. I think I have told this story before.

Back in 1989 my father-in-law spent his winters in Alamo, Tx a few miles from the border. A friend talked him into visiting an Orphanage in Matamoros, Mexico.  John had worked at Maytag for 30 yrs before retiring. He noticed they were washing clothes on washboards and there was a ringer style maytag sitting unused. He got to looking at it and found it needed parts. He Called one of his old bosses and asked about getting parts. His boss called him back in about an hour and said the last two wringer units built were in the warehouse.

Got an address and shipped them to the orphanage as a donation from the company.  Needless to say They were very grateful! 

 

In areas where water is not easy to come by, a wringer machine does not use 30 gallons of water for every load washed like an automatic?


Edited by JD DANNELS, March 26, 2014 - 03:44 PM.

  • Alc, boyscout862, oldedeeres and 1 other said thanks

#9 Chopperhed OFFLINE  

Chopperhed
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 20120
  • 1,852 Thanks
  • 1,071 posts
  • Location: Edmonton, Ab, Canada

Posted March 26, 2014 - 03:53 PM

My wife recently finished her degree in environmental science. One of the ideas taught up here in the field would make the 1%  cringe and cry.

 

It's as simple fact that, environmentally, as a whole, more damage is done to the whole planet in the manufacturing of a single vehicle than is done by driving said vehicle for 50 or more years. The whole "buy new because the new is cleaner" is really an effort to preserve gasoline, not out of any concern for the environment. That and it keeps engineers and managers busy figuring out how to make it more expensive and more necessary and harder to fix etc.

 

Every new unit, whether appliance, vehicle, or piece of equipment, that is manufactured, does more damage than simply fixing the old one, or repurposing it.

 

But then, you wouldn't buy a new one would you, and that's bad for business. 

 

 

 

 


  • Alc, IamSherwood, trowel and 4 others have said thanks

#10 trowel OFFLINE  

trowel

    Summer.

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Member No: 5127
  • 4,819 Thanks
  • 4,533 posts
  • Location: ma.

Posted March 26, 2014 - 04:08 PM

I find it ironic but at the same time rather amusing that still to this day all other countries are benefiting from America's ''gory days'' and continue to this day as always rebuild, reuse and pass on just about all thing mechanical while America jumps head first into sheer stupidity.

 

The thought makes me want to puke violently, everything our elders worked so hard for, taking pride in the quality by skilled trademens sold off for others to fix, enjoy and benefit from while we dig our own grave in a hurry.

Drugs, alcohol, pills, cheap food and electronics,...easy living life style has consumed America and the stupid blindly follows putting pleasure before necessity, even the poor is brainwashed at a very early age to desire easy life right now, a con by the Gov ?, i think so, more like the begining stages of dictatorship before inevitable Totalitarianism, a life of debt in other words is servitude to the doller and who holds the dollers ?

 

I state IMO :

Teach them while they are young and the possibilities are endless and permanently imprinted setting the standards for the future but when in the hands of a abuser it is typically limited only by how long the manipulators can sustain the lies and inevitably will dissolve resulting in the dissolution as a whole resulting in the ripple effect to any and all affiliated with the sum of the equation.

 

At least the tractors will continue to do what it was built to do, smart South Americans, at least they know a good thing when they see it and best of all, act on it.


Edited by trowel, March 26, 2014 - 04:17 PM.

  • boyscout862, oldedeeres, SamMC and 1 other said thanks

#11 KC9KAS OFFLINE  

KC9KAS
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 10038
  • 4,783 Thanks
  • 4,303 posts
  • Location: Holland, IN

Posted March 26, 2014 - 04:35 PM

Thanks for the information Glen.....BUT....If that ship carries off all our GT's to South America, how we going to find parts to keep ours going?


  • trowel said thank you

#12 MH81 OFFLINE  

MH81

    Proud to be Deplorable

  • Staff Admin
  • Staff
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 802
  • 27,277 Thanks
  • 28,615 posts
  • Location: N. W. PA

Posted March 26, 2014 - 04:51 PM

Glenn, be assured that none of mine will be sold directly to that guy. While I appreciate the idea that they are going to be loved again, it burns me slightly that they won't be loved here. Wish my fellow Countrymen would learn to enjoy their history.

On another note, why is this in the WH forum? I would think it would be a General Purpose post. It looks to be more suited for the Off Topic area, which is why I moved it.
  • olcowhand, DougT, Alc and 7 others have said thanks

#13 MFDAC OFFLINE  

MFDAC

    Only member from Western South Dakota!

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Member No: 5815
  • 2,028 Thanks
  • 1,123 posts
  • Location: East of Rapid City, SD in Rapid Valley

Posted March 26, 2014 - 10:00 PM

Interesting topic! I am glad at least they are going somwhere that will keep them in service. Around here it is heartbreaking to drive by the 2 main scrap yards and see the huge quantities of old ag equipment and trucks getting crushed and shredded. There is one smaller crusher yard thet saves the old stuff and allows parts purchases, but they don't get the majority of the business.

 

It never occured to me that I was being enviormentally friendly by driving my 58 and 42 year old trucks all the time, except when it is below freezing, then I drive a 23 year old truck--LOL! My Masseys aren't really my toys either altho I like to treat them as such. They have to do my chores here and if they break I have to fix them. Just can't run out and buy new stuff all the time like some folks seem to be able to do.

 

Enjoying the history as MH81 stated is really the main reason I keep using this old stuff. They are my time machines and when I'm driving the trucks or mowing and pushing snow with the MF's I feel like I have a little touch of the era they were made in.

 

DAC


Edited by MFDAC, March 26, 2014 - 10:01 PM.

  • MH81, Alc, IamSherwood and 5 others have said thanks

#14 jdslednut ONLINE  

jdslednut

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 77
  • 636 Thanks
  • 837 posts
  • Location: Winthrop, MN

Posted March 26, 2014 - 10:54 PM


 

Years ago, NY State required all graduating high school students to take a standard test and to pass it. One year, the high school teachers were required to take it too. Over 1500 teachers failed the test. They had already started the dumbing down and it has continued since. 

 

Yeah, I would probably fail that test as well.  However, I'm guessing it probably doesn't cover topics such as personal finance, farm and ranch management, livestock evaluation, 2 & 4 stroke theory, outdoor power equipment repair and maintenance, welding, career preparedness, horticulture, agronomy, natural resource management, fish & wildlife, firearms safety, landscape design and construction, plumbing, basic automotive repair and maintenance, construction, woodworking.  I suppose I could go on but the people in charge of setting our standards aren't listening anyway.

 

I see this all the time at school.  I have kids in my Plant Science/Horticulture class that could run circles around me in subjects like calculus but can't seem to figure out how to calculate a cost of production on a 6-pack of petunias.  On the other hand though, it's been enlightening to see students use geometry skills to help in the construction of their welding projects.  Most of my kids actually take the time to figure out their angles rather than the "cut it and the weld will fill the gap" method.


  • MH81, IamSherwood, trowel and 5 others have said thanks

#15 toomanytoys84 OFFLINE  

toomanytoys84

    Aaron

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 45129
  • 8,243 Thanks
  • 5,077 posts
  • Location: Ohio

Posted March 27, 2014 - 07:02 AM

I've always like Garden Tractors.  Real Garden tractors with welded solid steel frames, cast iron chunks, sold rear axles that take two men to lift, and the design of them.  I wouldn't buy a new tractor of any brand for any reason, stamped steel garbage.

 

I like the history behind the old tractors, and well, my wife tells me I am a glutton for punishment(I told her I know I married her) using this old equipment because I end up working on it frequently.  But I try to explain to her that I enjoy that.  Cutting grass, working on my tractors, and other things like that is a great release for me. 

 

I'd rather see those old tractors go on a ship to be rebuilt in another country and used than go to the scrap heap any day.


  • trowel and GlenPettit have said thanks




Top