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Chicken Poop


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#1 FrozenInTime OFFLINE  

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Posted March 24, 2014 - 11:18 PM

Question bout chicken poop.  I buy/use bales of pine shavings for my coup floor.  Can I dump this in my garden instead of bovine poop/hay?  I have heard that those that do let it decompose for atleast 6 months?  I have been reading about using saw dust in the garden, will pine chips also be ok (after the chickens are done with it)?  I get mine from TSC,  My garden is 1 year old, 20 by 30.  I plan on making it 60 by 40 this year, my soil is hard clay with spotty sand spots.  Half the garden will be melons, squash, etc that gets hill'd up.

 

Last year I dumped alot of grass clippings on the garden, well, covered all the ground bout 2 inches deep to control weeks.  I will turn that over before I start this spring... if spring ever comes.  I can also rake up lots of pine needless if that would help in the mix.


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#2 oldedeeres ONLINE  

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Posted March 24, 2014 - 11:45 PM

Before you use pine needles, have your soil analysed to see if it is acidic or not. When we planted some blueberries we were told to use pine to make the soil acidic for the blueberries. Some things require an acidic soil, some hate it. Sawdust does make good mulch and keeps the weeds down for sure, and will "lighten" hard clay and make it more porous. We work as much grass clippings and leaves etc. into the soil as we can. It seems I heard somewhere that chicken manure should be aged or composted for a year before using--- we've never used it so I don't know from personal experience. We use both cow and sheep manure that has been sitting in the manure pile for several years and have a bountiful garden.
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#3 farmer john OFFLINE  

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Posted March 25, 2014 - 12:26 AM

i have used chicken poop and shavings in the past, i have heavy clay soil and it worked very well at breaking it up but i did end up with a weed issue, weeds love acidic soil, this can be fixed by adding garden lime in the spring and letting it wash in, weeds hate sweet soil, tomatoes and melons love it, hope this helps. i'm 2 months away from planning my garden, last year in the second week of june frost killed everything, "canada, ya gotta live here to get it"


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#4 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted March 25, 2014 - 05:19 AM

Pine shavings are not going to break down as quickly as other soft woods. I'm not sure what that means for a garden. The needles are acidic but I'm not sure about the shavings. I've never used chicken poop. I've used seaweed compost lately and it works very well. There is a local company making it so it's readily available and not too expensive.


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#5 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted March 25, 2014 - 07:30 AM

There is a lot of nitrogen in chicken poo, which will help break down the pine shavings.  It takes nitrogen to get compost cooking.  Toss in other stuff as well, table scraps, leaves, and add some water to aid the process.  Best to mix the pile every week or 2 to get complete break down.  


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#6 grnspot110 ONLINE  

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Posted March 25, 2014 - 07:48 AM

If you have space, it might be best to "age" the shavings for a year before use!

 

I've used aged sawdust for garden mulch for years with good results:

 

HPIM1198 (640x477).jpg

 

Lowell


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#7 Guest_rdehli_*

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Posted March 25, 2014 - 08:17 AM

It is best to let that sit an organicly break down for a while . Put in on in the fall and let nature do its work. Soil testing is a very effective way to see what your garden, really needs for production. If your garden is 6o x 40 take 5 or 6 cores of soil no deeper than 6" { borrow a probe from your local coop or extension office. Mix all the dirt in a small bucket then take 3-4 hand fulls of soil into a bag and take to the extension office they will send to a lab and have it analalized. then feed your garden accordingly , my garden gets a good dose of poop in the fall { pen packed beef manure} leave it for 2 weeks then either plow it under or till it into the soil. in the spring I usually apply about 10 pounds of 46-0-0 urea and 10 pounds of both 0-0-60 potash and 18-46-0 Dap and then lime every 3-4 years. I work in nutrient mgmt. so its easy for me.
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#8 Guest_rdehli_*

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Posted March 25, 2014 - 08:21 AM

I would personaall stay away from pine needles, as they are very acidic, but if you want to rake to the garden then burn , its turns into phosphorous which all plants readily uses. I do that every fall and spring too. Good luck.
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#9 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted March 25, 2014 - 10:20 AM

Too much nitrogen can cause some plants to not put on fruit. Tomatoes with too much nitrogen will grow those 6 ft vines and very little fruit.

Chicken manure is very hot and can burn your garden. You really should let it age before use!  Not familiar with pine straw since it is not commonly available here. so have never used it. But understand it is high on the acid.


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#10 robert_p43 OFFLINE  

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Posted March 25, 2014 - 10:26 AM

I sometimes use wood chips on our hen house floor, other times, I use hay.  2 or 3 times a year, we clean it all up' put it in the cart, and dump it into the garden.  Anything organic helps to build the soil and fertilize. I have had no problems.


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#11 Guest_rdehli_*

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Posted March 25, 2014 - 11:48 AM

There is a lot of nitrogen in chicken poo, which will help break down the pine shavings.  It takes nitrogen to get compost cooking.  Toss in other stuff as well, table scraps, leaves, and add some water to aid the process.  Best to mix the pile every week or 2 to get complete break down.


I for got to add this too. chicken manure is an excellent source of Nitrogen but it is very potent. a little goes a long way.
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#12 skyrydr2 OFFLINE  

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Posted March 25, 2014 - 07:25 PM

I personally prefer chicky poop to cow poo. Way better nitrogen and less grass weeds. I mix it with sawdust and pine shavings and hardwood leaves to make some real nice soil. And this year I'mgoing to sweeten it up even more with a bit of lyme too.
Corn loves the stuff as does cukes and squash too. Peppers will have huge plants with poor fruit as does tomatoes too. So sweeten up their soil locally and you will have a killer crop.




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