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#1 johndeereelfman OFFLINE  

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Posted March 16, 2014 - 08:37 PM

Since things are going to start happening at a better pace, now that I'm back to work full time, I thought I'd give some updates as to what I've been doing the past few months. Most of you know that my wife and I bought on old house (Built in 1889)  last November at a public auction, and even though the place meets all of our needs, it is very out dated. The old lady who lived in it for almost 45 years has gone to a home, and has since passed away. Although her tastes in wall paper, paint and carpet might have suited her, it just won't do for us. To start, here is a refresher of the exterior views of the house and the garage.

 

Our new house Nov 2012 272.JPG Our new house Nov 2012 275.JPG Our new house Nov 2012 273.JPG Our new house Nov 2012 277.JPG

 

As soon as you enter the front door of the house, this is what you see. Big open staircase that leads to railing on the second floor. The cased opening you see in the first picture has now been removed to allow for a bigger opening that will lead into the new dinning room. The second picture is standing in that cased opening looking back towards the front door. The cased opening on the left side of the second picture leads to the living room.

 

House and Garage Pictures 013.JPG House and Garage Pictures 011.JPG

 

After walking through the cased opening shown above, you then enter into this room. This room was used as a television room. The cased opening shown in the first picture, leads you to the kitchen. This cased opening and wall, have since been removed. The second picture is a view looking towards the exterior side of the house on the West side. These two windows have now been replaced and the radiator has since been downsized and relocated under the left window. The third picture is standing in the kitchen cased opening, and looking back towards the front door. The door on the right of the third picture leads to the basement.

 

House and Garage Pictures 006.JPG House and Garage Pictures 005.JPG House and Garage Pictures 004.JPG

 

These pictures are of the existing kitchen. The first picture is standing in the cased opening looking towards the back of the house. The second picture is standing in the same cased opening looking towards the back door and mud room. The white stove you see is dated 1942 and works good. It is actually in mint condition according to the antique appraisers. The third picture is showing the sink and cabinetry. As you can see, not a whole lot of room for dishes, especially for a family of five. We never figured out what the little hand sink was for, but it's gone now. This room and the television room have been completely gutted, and combined to make one big room. Those pictures will be posted later on in the thread.

 

House and Garage Pictures 003.JPG House and Garage Pictures 002.JPG House and Garage Pictures 001.JPG

 

Through a cased opening from the television room, you enter into the existing dinning room. The first picture is looking towards the exterior side of the house on the East side. The second picture is standing in the living room cased opening looking into the existing dinning room towards the back of the house. The cased opening on the left side of the second picture leads to the television room. This cased opening and half of the wall have since been removed.

 

House and Garage Pictures 007.JPG House and Garage Pictures 008.JPG

 

This first picture is standing in the living room cased opening looking into the living room towards the front of the house. Three front windows and one just to the left of the picture. The second picture is standing in the foyer looking towards the cased opening between the living room and the existing dinning room. These contain large, stained, operable sliding pocket doors. The window to the right of the second picture, also shown on the left of the first picture, will eventually be removed and replaced with a new gas fireplace. 

 

House and Garage Pictures 009.JPG House and Garage Pictures 010.JPG

 

And lastly, here is a picture standing in the living room cased opening looking towards the front door and the West side of the house.

 

House and Garage Pictures 012.JPG

 

 

All of the rooms shown above are on the list for remodel within the next year and a half. The upstairs rooms are to remodeled later. I'll show pictures of the upstairs as I get ready to do them at a later date and time.  


Edited by johndeereelfman, March 17, 2014 - 09:23 AM.

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#2 johndeereelfman OFFLINE  

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Posted March 16, 2014 - 08:59 PM

First things first, the television room needed to be gutted of the horse hair plaster and wood lathe.

 

House and Garage Pictures 135.JPG

 

Next, the wall between the television room and the kitchen had to be removed.

 

kitchen and attachments 001.JPG

 

We then decided to remove and close in the window looking from the kitchen into the mud room.

 

Kitchen 9-2013 (2) - Copy.JPG

 

This picture shows partial removal of the wall between the television room and the existing dinning. Also shows the framing for the new laundry room as well as the metal stud soffit framing.

 

Kitchen 9-2013 (3).JPG

 

 

At this point, things were pretty much on hold, as we were removing the oil furnace and installing a new gas furnace. I also decided to tear out all of the old plumbing and install new PEX piping throughout the house. No more galvanized, black iron, copper, and plastic. I also updated the 60 amp electrical service to a new 200 amp service. Oh, and the cast iron sewer line decided it has had enough and broke, so I ended up tearing out all of the cast iron and installing all new scheduled 40 PVC. The only cast iron left in the house is a 2" vent from the upstairs bathroom up through the roof, and a 4" line running from inside the foundation wall out to the street. 


Edited by johndeereelfman, March 17, 2014 - 09:26 AM.

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#3 Cat385B ONLINE  

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Posted March 16, 2014 - 09:08 PM

These walls you're removing, they're not load bearing are they?
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#4 OkieGt OFFLINE  

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Posted March 16, 2014 - 09:08 PM

Since things are going to start happening at a better pace, now that I'm back to work full time, I thought I'd give some updates as to what I've been doing the past few months. Most of you know that my wife and I bought on old house (Built in 1889)  last November at a public auction, and even though the place meets all of our needs, it is very out dated. The old lady who lived in it for almost 45 years has gone to a home, and has since passed away. Although her tastes in wall paper, paint and carpet might have suited her, it just won't do for us. To start, here is a refresher of the exterior views of the house and the garage.

 

attachicon.gifOur new house Nov 2012 272.JPGattachicon.gifOur new house Nov 2012 275.JPGattachicon.gifOur new house Nov 2012 273.JPGattachicon.gifOur new house Nov 2012 277.JPG

 

As soon as you enter the front door of the house, this is what you see. Big open staircase that leads to railing on the second floor. The cased opening you see in the first picture has now been removed to allow for a bigger open that will lead into the new dinning room. The second picture is standing in that cased opening looking back towards the front door. The cased opening on the laft side of the second picture leads to the living room.

 

attachicon.gifHouse and Garage Pictures 013.JPGattachicon.gifHouse and Garage Pictures 011.JPG

 

After walking through the cased opening shown above, you then entered into this room. This room was used as a television room. The cased opening shown in the first picture, leads you to the kitchen. This cased opening and wall, have since been removed. The second picture is a view looking towards the exterior side of the house on the West side. These two windows have now been replaced and the radiator has since been downsized and relocated under the left window. The third picture is standing in the kitchen cased opening, and looking back towards the front door. The door on the right of the third picture leads to the basement.

 

attachicon.gifHouse and Garage Pictures 006.JPGattachicon.gifHouse and Garage Pictures 005.JPGattachicon.gifHouse and Garage Pictures 004.JPG

 

These pictures are of the existing kitchen. The first picture is standing in the cased opening looking towards the back of the house. The second picture is standing in the same cased opening looking towards the back door and mud room. The white stove you see is dated 1942 and works good. It is actually in mint condition according to the antique appraisers. The third picture is showing the sink and cabinetry. As you can see, not a whole lot of room for dishes, especially for a family of five. We never figured out what the little hand sink was for, but it's gone now. This room and the television room have been completely gutted, and combined to make one big room. Those pictures will be posted later on in the thread.

 

attachicon.gifHouse and Garage Pictures 003.JPGattachicon.gifHouse and Garage Pictures 002.JPGattachicon.gifHouse and Garage Pictures 001.JPG

 

Through a cased opening from the television room, you enter into the existing dinning room. The first picture is looking towards the exterior side of the house on the East side. The second picture is standing in the living room cased opening looking into the existing dinning room towards the back of the house. The cased opening on the left side of the second picture leads to the television room. This cased opening and half of the wall have since been removed.

 

attachicon.gifHouse and Garage Pictures 007.JPGattachicon.gifHouse and Garage Pictures 008.JPG

 

This first picture is standing in the living room cased opening looking into the living room towards the front of the house. Three front windows and one just to the left of the picture. The second picture is standing in the foyer looking towards the cased opening between the living room and the existing dinning room. These contain large, stained, operable sliding pocket doors. The window to the right of the second picture, also shown on the left of the first picture, will eventually be removed and replaced with a new gas fireplace. 

 

attachicon.gifHouse and Garage Pictures 009.JPGattachicon.gifHouse and Garage Pictures 010.JPG

 

And lastly, here is a picture standing in the living room cased opening looking towards the front door and the West side of the house.

 

attachicon.gifHouse and Garage Pictures 012.JPG

 

 

All of the rooms shown above are on the list for remodel within the next year and a half. The upstairs rooms are to remodeled later. I'll show pictures of the upstairs as I get ready to do them at a later date and time.  

Around here many municipalities required an upgrade on electrical and maybe plumbing, if the cost or extent of the remodel exceeds 1/4 cost of the purchase price. And to be fair it is a real good code for safety's sake. This house if you upgrade alliance and or heat and air need a 200 amp service panel. If your lucky someone has already rewired the house with newer up to modern code wiring, but if the job was done over 30 years ago and you plan on a kitchen remodel you may again need an electrical upgrade or assessment.


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#5 johndeereelfman OFFLINE  

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Posted March 16, 2014 - 09:37 PM

My wife decided she didn't want the window above the existing kitchen sink, since it looked directly into the neighbors window, so I removed and enclosed it.

 

end of 2013 067.JPG end of 2013 068.JPG

 

Here is where I have to apologize. Apparently when we were having trouble with our computer, we lost some of the update pictures that my wife was taking on a weekly basis. So with that said, I just have to verbally tell you what happened next. Basically, all of the exterior wall were insulated, new plumbing ran for the washer and kitchen sink, new romex wiring for all of the outlets, recessed can lights, television, dishwasher, gas stove, and garbage disposal. Our ceilings are 9'-0" high throughout the house, but I wanted my wife to have a double tray ceiling with continuous crown molding. Since I didn't want a lot of weight hanging from the ceiling joists, I used metal studding to frame out my soffits and tray ceilings. I hung 1/2" drywall on all of the walls, and 3/8" drywall on the ceilings and soffits. During this time, we also picked up our new kitchen cabinets, kitchen sink and faucet. Since removing the existing sink, I had to make a temporary sink for my wife, so two layers of 3/8" plywood made a decent countertop for her.

 

These pictures are standing where the old cased opening used to be between the foyer and the television room, looking towards the back of the house into the where the existing kitchen used to be. This should also help you to understand what I mean as far as a double tray ceiling.

 

end of 2013 069.JPG paint colors 001.JPG

 

Here are pictures to show just how much more room we were able to get by opening up a few walls.

 

Kitchen Jan 27. 2014 001.JPG Kitchen Jan 27. 2014 003.JPG

 

And a picture of how the windows and doors will be trimmed out. This is standing in the existing television room looking West towards the exterior of the house. That is the door to the basement on the left side. 

 

Kitchen Jan 27. 2014 002.JPG

 

And last but not least, some of my drywall work. Not perfect, but decent for a first timer.

 

Massey Ferguson Tag 004.JPG Massey Ferguson Tag 005.JPG

 

 

The drywall is all sanded and ready for priming. My wife and mother-in-law are planning on starting to paint on Tuesday morning. Today and yesterday, I worked on stripping the paint off of the back door and frame, and also stripped the paint off of the existing hardware. Boy, these doors have some nice hinges. I'll post pictures of them maybe tomorrow night.

 

Hope you enjoy my little venture, and I'll update as things change and become my progressive. 


Edited by johndeereelfman, March 17, 2014 - 09:29 AM.

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#6 johndeereelfman OFFLINE  

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Posted March 16, 2014 - 09:43 PM

These walls you're removing, they're not load bearing are they?

 

The wall between the television room and the kitchen was not a load bearing wall, but the wall between the television room and the existing dinning room was. I only removed half of the load bearing wall, but I reinforced the wall with (4) new 2 x 12 joists and have plenty of 2 x 6 and 2 x 4 framing under them. 


Edited by johndeereelfman, March 17, 2014 - 09:29 AM.

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#7 OkieGt OFFLINE  

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Posted March 16, 2014 - 09:47 PM

My wife decided she didn't want the window above the existing kitchen sink, since it looked directly into the neighbors window, so I removed and enclosed it.

 

attachicon.gifend of 2013 067.JPGattachicon.gifend of 2013 068.JPG

 

Here is where I have to apologize. Apparently when we were having trouble with our computer, we lost some of the update pictures that my wife was taking on a weekly basis. So with that said, I just have to verbally tell you what happened next. Basically, all of the exterior wall were insulated, new plumbing ran for the washer and kitchen sink, new romex wiring for all of the outlets, recessed can lights, television, dishwasher, gas stove, and garbage disposal. Our ceiling are 9'-0" high throughout the house, but I wanted my wife to have a double tray ceiling with continuous crown molding. Since I didn't want a lot of weight hanging from the ceiling joists, I used metal studding to frame out my soffits and tray ceilings. I hung 1/2" drywall on all of the walls, and 3/8" drywall on the ceilings and soffits. During this time, we also picked up our new kitchen cabinets, kitchen sink and faucet. Since removing the existing sink, I had to make a temporary sink for my wife, so two layers of 3/8" plywood made a decent countertop for her.

 

These pictures are standing where the old cased opening used to be between the foyer and the television room, looking towards the back of the house into the where the existing kitchen used to be. This should also help you to understand what I mean as far as a double tray ceiling.

 

attachicon.gifend of 2013 069.JPGattachicon.gifpaint colors 001.JPG

 

Here are pictures to show just how much more room we were able to get by opening up a few walls.

 

attachicon.gifKitchen Jan 27. 2014 001.JPGattachicon.gifKitchen Jan 27. 2014 003.JPG

 

And a picture of how the windows and doors will be trimmed out. This is standing in the existing television room looking West towards the exterior of the house. That is the door to the basement on the left side. 

 

attachicon.gifKitchen Jan 27. 2014 002.JPG

 

And last but not least, some of my drywall work. Not perfect, but decent for a first timer.

 

attachicon.gifMassey Ferguson Tag 004.JPGattachicon.gifMassey Ferguson Tag 005.JPG

 

 

The drywall is all sanded and ready for priming. My wife and mother-in-law are planning on starting to paint on Tuesday morning. Today and yesterday, I worked on stripping the paint off of the back door and frame, and also stripped the paint off of the existing hardware. Boy, these doors have some nice hinges. I'll post pictures of them maybe tomorrow night.

 

Hope you enjoy my little venture, and I'll update as things change and become my progressive. 

Looks like your way above most DIY's, the double tray was a great way to bring the ceiling down some and update the kitchen, Try PVA latex primer on the drywall, you wont be sorry. I use lambswool rollers, they take a little getting used to (have to keep them full and wet, no pushing) but they do a great job, splatter very little, and clean up EASY. 


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#8 johndeereelfman OFFLINE  

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Posted March 16, 2014 - 09:53 PM

Around here many municipalities required an upgrade on electrical and maybe plumbing, if the cost or extent of the remodel exceeds 1/4 cost of the purchase price. And to be fair it is a real good code for safety's sake. This house if you upgrade alliance and or heat and air need a 200 amp service panel. If your lucky someone has already rewired the house with newer up to modern code wiring, but if the job was done over 30 years ago and you plan on a kitchen remodel you may again need an electrical upgrade or assessment.

 

Although I'm doing all of the work myself, the upgraded electrical service and the new gas furnace was hired out and done by professionals. I've been a union carpenter for 11 years and a finish carpenter for eight years. I have the experience to get the job done, and know when to call in the professionals. I'm kind of a jack of all trades so to speak. I'm good at electrical, plumbing, drywalling, tiling, roofing, concrete, and carpet laying. About the only thing I haven't tried yet is masonry. But hey, I'm willing to get that one under my belt too if the opportunity comes around.

 

The house has knob and tube wiring, so I'm running new wiring where I can, as I can, and eliminated all that I can. All permits are in place with the municipalities, and inspections are passed and complete. :thumbs:  


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#9 OkieGt OFFLINE  

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Posted March 16, 2014 - 10:02 PM

Although I'm doing all of the work myself, the upgraded electrical service and the new gas furnace was hired out and done by professionals. I've been a union carpenter for 11 years and a finish carpenter for eight years. I have the experience to get the job done, and know when to call in the professionals. I'm kind of a jack of all trades so to speak. I'm good at electrical, plumbing, drywalling, tiling, roofing, concrete, and carpet laying. About the only thing I haven't tried yet is masonry. But hey, I'm willing to get that one under my belt too if the opportunity comes around.

 

The house has knob and tube wiring, so I'm running new wiring where I can, as I can, and eliminated all that I can. All permits are in place with the municipalities, and inspections are passed and complete. :thumbs:  

Did not know your qualifications, but from what I see in the pictures it is coming along beautifully. GREAT JOB !!!!


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#10 Sawdust OFFLINE  

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Posted March 16, 2014 - 10:05 PM

So your not keeping that little sink by the window cut into the trim :D  The house looks great...nice old trim. Will you still be using the old pocket door? These old houses were nice but all the doors & walls are just too much in todays construction with the open concept feeling. The reason back then & I can remember during the cold winter months the rooms not used were blocked off to help keep the rest of the house warm. I would help my Dad do this...gosh I'm getting old  :tapping_fingers:


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#11 Sawdust OFFLINE  

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Posted March 16, 2014 - 10:08 PM

Although I'm doing all of the work myself, the upgraded electrical service and the new gas furnace was hired out and done by professionals. I've been a union carpenter for 11 years and a finish carpenter for eight years. I have the experience to get the job done, and know when to call in the professionals. I'm kind of a jack of all trades so to speak. I'm good at electrical, plumbing, drywalling, tiling, roofing, concrete, and carpet laying. About the only thing I haven't tried yet is masonry. But hey, I'm willing to get that one under my belt too if the opportunity comes around.

 

The house has knob and tube wiring, so I'm running new wiring where I can, as I can, and eliminated all that I can. All permits are in place with the municipalities, and inspections are passed and complete. :thumbs:  

Keep all your porcelain knobs & tubes the stuff sells at flea markets & Ebay.


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#12 OkieGt OFFLINE  

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Posted March 16, 2014 - 10:09 PM

So your not keeping that little sink by the window cut into the trim :D  The house looks great...nice old trim. Will you still be using the old pocket door? These old houses were nice but all the doors & walls are just too much in todays construction with the open concept feeling. The reason back then & I can remember during the cold winter months the rooms not used were blocked off to help keep the rest of the house warm. I would help my Dad do this...gosh I'm getting old  :tapping_fingers:

My eyes arent that good, but I would say it almost looks like the wood and this house was remodeled in the late 1980s early 1990s


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#13 Sawdust OFFLINE  

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Posted March 16, 2014 - 11:23 PM

I would say original for a few reasons. Fluted door casings are wide enough, corner blocks are too. Raised panel doors look to be solid wood. Base board looks to be one piece milled & not 1x8 with a cap.  Receptacles recessed in the baseboard. Door hardware looks original. The whole house is consistant whether painted or stained. The entry I would say is defintely original. Like you said it's hard to see in some areas. It's going to be a good project to follow.


Edited by Sawdust, March 16, 2014 - 11:29 PM.

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#14 zippy1 OFFLINE  

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Posted March 17, 2014 - 01:15 AM

Great old house, I always wished the walls could talk :thumbs:

But I did freak out a tad when I realized the pictures of the outside were neighbors homes. A little to close for my liking.

I need to pee around my property, and I'm thinking the neighbors would frown on that :watch_over_fence:


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#15 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted March 17, 2014 - 05:04 AM

Looks to be coming along well, Troy! Thanks for the pics!


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