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Hot Cold Spark Plugs


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#1 hatedge OFFLINE  

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Posted March 15, 2014 - 08:28 AM

Here I was explaining to a friend the need to use hotter or colder plugs when operating snowmobiles in colder or hotter weather. I then realised that the same applies to our tractors.
 
For those of you whom arent familiar with the Hot/cold spark plug thing heres a quick explanation:
 
The temperature of the spark plug's firing end must be kept low enough to prevent pre-ignition, but high enough to prevent fouling. This is called "Thermal Performance", and is determined by the heat range selected.

It is important to remember that spark plugs do not create heat , they can only remove heat. The spark plug works as a heat exchanger by transferring the heat to the engine's cooling system(liquid, fan or free air). The heat range is defined as a plug's ability to dissipate heat.
 
Whether the spark plugs are fitted in a lawnmower, boat, or a race car, the spark plug tip temperature must remain between 932F and 1562F (500C-850C). If the tip temperature is lower than 500°C, the insulator area surrounding the center electrode will not be hot enough to burn off carbon and combustion chamber deposits. These accumulated deposits can result in spark plug fouling leading to misfire. If the tip temperature is higher than 1562F the spark plug will overheat which may cause the ceramic around the center electrode to blister and the electrodes to melt. This may lead to pre-ignition/detonation and engine damage.
 
Heres a little image to help understand
 
image002
Album: spark plug
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Now that we all know what im talking about, my question is:
Does any of you guys change your plugs in the winter or do you all keep the same plugs all year 'round?

Edited by hatedge, March 15, 2014 - 08:30 AM.

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#2 propane1 ONLINE  

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Posted March 15, 2014 - 09:19 AM

same plug year round. never thought about changing plugs. manufactures of small engines tell which plug to put in.  I have never seen them say hot plug or cold plug for different conditions.  I some times change fuel. hi test or low test gasoline.   


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#3 KC9KAS ONLINE  

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Posted March 15, 2014 - 10:30 AM

I too run the same plug winter/summer.

I use what ever the engine manufacture information suggests.


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#4 Cat385B ONLINE  

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Posted March 15, 2014 - 10:54 AM

Wouldn't the internal temp of the engine be the same no matter what after a short amount of run time? Like 30 seconds? I can't see how the external air temp, be it 10 degrees or 80 degrees, would affect the internal temp of the head.
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#5 hatedge OFFLINE  

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Posted March 15, 2014 - 12:53 PM

Wouldn't the internal temp of the engine be the same no matter what after a short amount of run time? Like 30 seconds? I can't see how the external air temp, be it 10 degrees or 80 degrees, would affect the internal temp of the head.

air cooled engines have higher temp in summer than in winter. Hot air cools less efficiently than cold air



#6 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted March 15, 2014 - 02:49 PM

I remember a lot of talk about that with 2 cycle snowmobile engines back in the 70's. I don't think I've ever seen it mentioned in any tractor or engine manual I've seen for 4 stroke engines. 


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#7 hatedge OFFLINE  

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Posted March 15, 2014 - 08:36 PM

Well it is a common practice in antique snowmobiles. 2 or 4 strokes wouldnt change much if its air cooled no?

Remember im wondering about it and not TELLING you guys that it must be done


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