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Stripping Steel For Welding?


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#1 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted March 11, 2014 - 10:30 AM

No pictures yet, But I finally broke down and bought my first new welder(have had 1 used in the past).

Bought a Hobart Handler 125. Since most of my welding will be done outside, I will probably stick with Flux Core.

Now to my question. I salvaged a lot of 1/8" steel from the modular home I tore down last summer.

It is covered with an undercoating  or possibly epoxy coating(?) that needs to be stripped off before I can use it for projects. I don't have a sandblaster. I did a bit with the 4 1/2" grinder but it is only about 1/2 ok.

How would you strip this? It's too good a material to not use.


Edited by JD DANNELS, March 11, 2014 - 03:52 PM.


#2 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted March 11, 2014 - 10:37 AM

Congrats on the welder. I'm wondering if you could loosen it or remove it completely with solvent or maybe even an electrolysis tank. It's hard to tell without seeing it first hand.


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#3 Guest_rdehli_*

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Posted March 11, 2014 - 10:59 AM

I wonder if heating the steel up will cause the epoxy type stuff to loosen up ?   but that could be a slow and tedious process. 


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#4 Kyocum OFFLINE  

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Posted March 11, 2014 - 11:25 AM

I reckon if it were me I would just clean up the area to be welded and paint the rest when you are done fabbing.


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#5 boyscout862 OFFLINE  

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Posted March 11, 2014 - 12:22 PM

If you have time, try putting it out in the sun with clear plastic above it to warm up. With it hot, the coating may come off easier. Good Luck, Rick


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#6 HDWildBill ONLINE  

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Posted March 11, 2014 - 12:38 PM

If you don't need it off then I think I would do what Kyocum suggested.  I assume it is to big a sheet to go in the electrolysis tank so maybe what Rick suggested.


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#7 Cvans OFFLINE  

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Posted March 11, 2014 - 12:48 PM

I have to agree with Kyocum also. If the integrity of the old paint is good just remove it in the area of the weld. Be sure to have good ventilation when welding and keep your head out of the smoke.


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#8 JD DANNELS ONLINE  

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Posted March 11, 2014 - 01:34 PM

Most of what I'm woring with is 1/8" channels aprox 1" X5"  and Aprox 8 ft long They were the Stringers between the I Beams.

Yes I was planning to remove the areas  I would be welding.  I have been wondering how well a wire cup brush would work?  The Sanding discs just load up with a gooey mess.  Ist project would be a welder cart.

2nd would   be a 3 point carryall to take trash cans out to the end of the drive I take  them out Tesday nights and Wednesdays when  I get home I have to go looking for them since it is so windy on this hill.  The Poly cans could be anywhere?  I have never understood why a trash hauler can take the lids off but can never put them back on a can?
 


Edited by JD DANNELS, March 11, 2014 - 01:35 PM.

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#9 boyscout862 OFFLINE  

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Posted March 11, 2014 - 02:33 PM

  I have never understood why a trash hauler can take the lids off but can never put them back on a can?
 

It the same reason kids can't put anything back in the refridgerator. Good Luck, Rick


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#10 Chopperhed ONLINE  

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Posted March 11, 2014 - 03:18 PM

I've had good luck using aircraft stripper to strip powder coated parts. It may work for you as well.


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#11 petrj6 OFFLINE  

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Posted March 11, 2014 - 04:35 PM

     The wire wheel is a good idea butt it makes a huge mess and will leave some left over residue.  the only real way to remove it would be a good sandblaster.  If it were me I would grind where the weld are going to be, go about 2" away from the weld area and leave the rest.  I have used old trailer frames in the past and as long as you don't care about the looks leave the old stuff, there is nothing like it to stand up to the environment.  Good luck with the new welder and your projects.


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#12 HDWildBill ONLINE  

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Posted March 11, 2014 - 05:21 PM

What about these flap wheels for the 4 1/2" grinder?  I've been using them to grind down welds and boy they make short work out it.

 

You can see what I'm talking about here in the top part of the picture.


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#13 Sawdust OFFLINE  

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Posted March 11, 2014 - 07:16 PM

I think breaking the stuff down with solvents then scrape it. The problem I have encountered with abrasives or wiring something you can't really let it get too hot or like you said it turns gooey.


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#14 superaben OFFLINE  

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Posted March 11, 2014 - 07:43 PM

I like the 3M stripper "pads" that you chuck into a drill.  Its a glorified kitchen scrubbie.  I bought two to use for the first time, and it make short work of decals.  It did turn the decal into a goop, but the wheel never got clogged, just like a good scrubbie.

 

The stripper pad will be slow, though, to clean that much material. 

 

Ben W.


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#15 Chopperhed OFFLINE  

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Posted March 11, 2014 - 09:50 PM

depending on the gauge or thickness of the material, all of the above will work. However, thin light gauge material will warp if you get it hot. 1/4" wall frame sections and heavy wall stuff can be mechanically cleaned with no worries about warpage. Mechanical cleaning includes flapper wheels, 3m wheels, wire brushes sandblasting etc.

On thin sheet metal mechanical cleaning can cause parts to get too hot, and warp. the wire brush is about the safest way to do it. I've used stainless and brass cupped wheels for paint stripping, both have worked ok, except for the thousands of metal wires in my clothes.

The 3m wheel on a drill will work ok too, if you move quickly to avoid heat build up.

sand blasting will warp thin pieces, it build up heat quite quickly.

The 4-1/2" flapper wheel will warp thin pieces too if the paint is thick, or you stay too long in one place.

I've used industrial grade aircraft stripper on cast and sheet aluminum, steel, and plastic, with no problems except the cleanup. Standard off the shelf Polystrippa will work fine on thinner paint coatings, and probably heavy PC with multiple apps. It worked OK on 35 year old sun baked tractor paint.

Low pressure organic blasting (soda, walnut shell, etc.) is pretty safe. I've used walnut shell to blast engines with no problems.
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