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I Am Officially In The United States Navy


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#31 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted March 11, 2014 - 08:07 AM

Good luck in this new adventure Ryan!! I enlisted in the Army, Air Force, Marines and National Guard all of which turned me down for physical reasons (bad eyes).  The Gig I really wanted was the guarantee of service in the Black Forest of Germany as a Misstle Guidance Tech.

 

Listen to what the guys are telling you about getting what you want in writing.

 

My Nephew was in the Army and wanted to be a Diesel Tech. When the Army found out he was fluent in speaking Japanese(His best friend was Japanese and he spent a lot of time in their home) they gave him a rough time, trying to get him to change his classification and be an interpreter.


Edited by JD DANNELS, March 11, 2014 - 08:13 AM.


#32 EconChuck OFFLINE  

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Posted March 11, 2014 - 09:34 AM

Congrats Ryan.

 

My son graduated from high school in '96 and joined the Navy, he successfully went through all of the Nuke schools and was assigned to the  Aircraft Carrier-CVN-72 Abraham Lincoln based out of Everett, Wash. They made 2 trips to the middle East during his tenure.

He has since received his BS in Nuclear Engineering from Purdue and is currently a Reactor Engineer with a power utility.

 

It was not an easy road, but he would not trade the experienes for anything.

 

ps. He is married to a Nuclear Engineer and the grandkids "do not glow in the dark".

 

Good luck. 

Chuck


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#33 daytime dave ONLINE  

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Posted March 11, 2014 - 09:59 AM

Congratulations Ryan.  That is truly good news.  I hope you are able to do what you want to in the navy.  If you get into the nuclear program, I hope you go as far as you want.  

 

Be careful if you do get in with the nuclear reactors and such, all that cash might become addicting. 

 

Good luck.



#34 HDWildBill OFFLINE  

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Posted March 11, 2014 - 10:11 AM

Ryan, as I read through all these post's one other word of advice came to mind.  Once you get out to the fleet you will have the opportunity to take college courses and the Navy will pay the tuition for the course (Not GI Bill).  They will also pay for Adult continuing ed courses as well.  Take advantage of this!  It might mean you can't go out drinking a night or two but when you get older you will be glad you did.  Depending on which way you decide you could walk away with a doctorate degree if you chose the college route.


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#35 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted March 11, 2014 - 10:35 AM

Congrats Ryan. You have chosen a path in life that will offer you a world of challenges and IMO you are just the man to take them on!


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#36 Ryan313 OFFLINE  

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Posted March 11, 2014 - 06:17 PM

Thanks everybody! I am glad you are all as supportive as you are, it means a lot. My recruiter, would much rather me be a nuke then a hull tech, plus he and the chief at the office are both great guys and I don't think they would screw me over; however, I will take all of your advice and make sure it gets done.

When I am in I do plan on doing schooling to get a degree. The nuclear power school is in Charleston, and I will be there for almost two years. The classes there will give me just about everything I need to get a degree in nuclear engineering; the only other classes I would need are English, history, and what ever else.
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#37 chris m OFFLINE  

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Posted March 11, 2014 - 07:16 PM

Thats great Ryan! Congrats and good luck!! I think you have made a great choice!!

 

Don't be trying to be the first person to make a Nuke powered PK though!  :poke:  :watching_you: :D


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#38 HDWildBill OFFLINE  

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Posted March 11, 2014 - 08:12 PM

Thats great Ryan! Congrats and good luck!! I think you have made a great choice!!

 

Don't be trying to be the first person to make a Nuke powered PK though!  :poke:  :watching_you: :D

 

That would open up a complete new Tractor event.  Plow Night!  It would look like a bunch of big lighting bugs with all the tractors glowing! :reading_the_manual:  :oh_shucks:


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#39 johndeereelfman OFFLINE  

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Posted March 11, 2014 - 08:37 PM

Congrats Ryan! We know you'll do well, and will be devoted and dedicated to your tasks and schooling as much as you were to us. You're doing us all proud young man, and we all wish you the very best. The site won't be the same around here without you, and you will be missed. Lot's of good advice from the guys, and knowing that you have a good head on your shoulders, we feel comfortable in sending you off on your own, knowing you'll make good decisions. As a Father, I have to tell you, it feels like our baby is leaving the nest!

 

Train hard, learn as much as you can, and be safe. We hate to see you go, but we know you are in good hands. Take Care my Friend, and please keep in touch when you can. We want to venture with you, and even though updates would be greatly appreciated, please concentrate on your goals and dreams first, and then when you have the time, check in with us! We'll always be here for you, and will support you 100%. Oh, and rest assured, we'll always Welcome you back with open arms!  :thumbs:

 

Take Care,

Troy


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#40 New.Canadian.DB.Owner OFFLINE  

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Posted March 12, 2014 - 12:29 PM

I did 21 years with the Canadian military.  Here is the sum total of what I learned:  The military is nothing more than people doing things.  If you want to get ahead, know who does what and know how to do something.  Sounds silly, but you will see.  

 

The tool crib attendant / pay clerk / driver / medic / cook / etc isn't just a humanoid who appears out of nowhere at 7 am and disappears at 430 pm.  Learn his/her name, and you will get good service.  Learn about their families & hobbies, and you will get awesome service.  Eventually, your unit will need something it can't get through regular channels.  If you can say, "I will call Bob over at ...", you will become a person people turn to in a crisis.  People who solve problems move up, people who cause problems don't.  

 

Even after being out for more than a decade, I still run into guys I served with and the topic is always "Remember Joe?  He is now doing ..."

 

Likewise, learn to do something.  Become an expert in some difficult or rarely used procedure.  You want people coming to you when the chips are down.  


Edited by New.Canadian.DB.Owner, March 12, 2014 - 12:30 PM.

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#41 boyscout862 OFFLINE  

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Posted March 13, 2014 - 08:03 AM

I did 21 years with the Canadian military.  Here is the sum total of what I learned:  The military is nothing more than people doing things.  If you want to get ahead, know who does what and know how to do something.  Sounds silly, but you will see.  

 

The tool crib attendant / pay clerk / driver / medic / cook / etc isn't just a humanoid who appears out of nowhere at 7 am and disappears at 430 pm.  Learn his/her name, and you will get good service.  Learn about their families & hobbies, and you will get awesome service.  Eventually, your unit will need something it can't get through regular channels.  If you can say, "I will call Bob over at ...", you will become a person people turn to in a crisis.  People who solve problems move up, people who cause problems don't.  

 

Even after being out for more than a decade, I still run into guys I served with and the topic is always "Remember Joe?  He is now doing ..."

 

Likewise, learn to do something.  Become an expert in some difficult or rarely used procedure.  You want people coming to you when the chips are down.  

That is excellant advice. It worked for me in the US Army and civilian life afterward. I will add a warning because I saw it too many times. Be very carefull of the places off base. Many are ripoffs. Good Luck, Rick


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#42 toomanytoys84 OFFLINE  

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Posted March 13, 2014 - 08:24 AM

 

The tool crib attendant / pay clerk / driver / medic / cook / etc isn't just a humanoid who appears out of nowhere at 7 am and disappears at 430 pm.  Learn his/her name, and you will get good service.  Learn about their families & hobbies, and you will get awesome service.  Eventually, your unit will need something it can't get through regular channels.  If you can say, "I will call Bob over at ...", you will become a person people turn to in a crisis.  People who solve problems move up, people who cause problems don't.  

 

 

I agree.  At my work now I make sure I know everyone.  The lowest supply man in the warehouse I can tell you his names, his families names, what his kids are doing, ect ect.  When I walk back there and need help, he will bend over backwards to help me.  That goes for anyone you work with, plus it makes it more pleasant to work with people you know and like.

 

I became that go to guy at the Coal mines.  Aaron will know someone who can help us do this or that in a crisis.


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#43 twostep OFFLINE  

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Posted March 13, 2014 - 08:56 AM

Congrat's!! You are doing a smart and good thing!


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#44 HDWildBill OFFLINE  

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Posted March 13, 2014 - 10:09 AM

Ryan, along with New.Canadian’s comments, one thing I learned especially as I worked my way up the ranks.  Never accept "No" on it's face value. I found that if I wanted to get something accomplished usually there was more then one way to accomplish that.  You just have to figure out how to do that and one way is who you know.  Remember Radar or Klinger in Mash?  Case in point we had a first class who had a family problem come up while on deployment.  He needed to retire ASAP.  The command and the bureau said at least 6 months to get everything done.  My buddy Bill and I contacted a mutual friend in DC.  The First class was retired and one his way home the next week. 

 

Another thing you will find out very quickly is a Chief is like GOD in the Navy.  You will hear the expression "Chiefs run the Navy."  That is very true.  So get to know your Chief and make him you friend.


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#45 coldone OFFLINE  

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Posted March 13, 2014 - 05:09 PM

Another thing you will find out very quickly is a Chief is like GOD in the Navy.  You will hear the expression "Chiefs run the Navy."  That is very true.  So get to know your Chief and make him you friend.

 

All Joking aside, Navy Chiefs can make or break you. They have the best networking of any branch. They make the internet look like kindergarden. Treat them with respect always, never argue with them. 

 

Now for a little Military advice my Top gave me, "Dont complain or argue about doing it until you've done it". You may want to argue or whine about having to do something, but get the job done first then you can do all your whining after the job is done


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