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Home Built Sandblaster Ideas.


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#1 trowel OFFLINE  

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Posted March 06, 2014 - 07:50 AM

Bob's thread on sandblasting rekindled something for me.

 

I do a fair amount of blasting and will be doing much more in the years to come, have thought about buying my own, a used pressure pot or home building one, web is full of hints and tricks on building one.

 

Any one out there who homebuilt/modified one out of propane/gas tanks ?

Would love to see your set up and hear your advices on building and what's best to use.

 

 



#2 trowel OFFLINE  

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Posted March 06, 2014 - 08:51 AM

To kick things off a bit,...

 

I bought this compressor for painting, running air hammers, air rachets and was thinking of using it for sand blasting.

 

Named ''OBNOXIOUS'' for very good reasons.

 

The company PK Lindsay "Give them Air" built compressors and sand blasting equipments of various sizes. This compressor, electric start model HUE 25, was repainted yellow and used to blow up above ground pools, powered by a Wisconsin S12D engine direct coupled to the single stage cast iron V-twin cylinder compressor for 25 CFM continually through a 3/8 hose at 125 PSI, 30 CFM through 1/4 hose at 95 PSI or so.

Great for filling farm tractor tires in half the time it would take my Emglo wheelbarrow compressor to and was hard on it anyways.

 

The engine and compressor crankcases are shared, the compressor uses automotive exhaust valves, poppet intake valves, head mounted manual unloader with tank mounted pilot valve all mounted on heavy gauge well casing type steel tanks.

 

Have been thinking about selling off the engine on and off thruout the years for compressor and/or GT parts and remounted a diesel powered set up on the tanks. Was truck mounted on leaf springs but i converted it to portable with folding handles.

 

EDIT : Computer connection is very bad today, had to edit several times, will be back in a while.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Edited by trowel, March 06, 2014 - 09:34 AM.

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#3 boyscout862 ONLINE  

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Posted March 06, 2014 - 09:23 AM

Keep the compressor if it works good. The sand blasters and and cabinets come up used so frequently and cheap that it is a waste of time to build one. Just keep your eyes open. The big compressor will make all the difference in keeping the blaster going. My big electric compressor is good for an 1/8" tip but as the tip wears it has trouble keeping up.  

 

The most important thing is your protection. The dust can kill you. A good breathing system and eye protection is required. You also have to watch out for where that cloud is going. Good Luck, Rick


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#4 gunstuff1000 ONLINE  

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Posted March 06, 2014 - 10:18 AM

I would suggest have a larger storage tank for the air that little tank on the compressor isn't ideal for blasting the pump an engine is more than enough an then some but you will run into the fact that it will run continually because there is really no significant storage tank I have a 5hp two stage piston driven compressor that's 220v single phase it has a 80gallon tank it will blast for a few minutes then it kicks on an takes about 5-8mins to build back up while continuing to blast before it shuts back off I was told by the compressor dealer where I got mine that when blasting you want a good size tank an a compressor that is capable of building back up an shutting down while blasting if not you are putting a lot if wear an tear on the compressor Just my two cents!
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#5 New.Canadian.DB.Owner OFFLINE  

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Posted March 06, 2014 - 12:41 PM

If you are going to build one, consider lighting, ventilation / filtration, and size.  

 

I have one with the light mounted on the back wall.  Not much help.  the clean spot is always in the shadows.

 

Ventilation is important because you will be dumping a ton of air into a small space.  The air needs to, and will, go somewhere.  If there is no exit filter, it will go into the air you are breathing.

 

If the box is smaller than the parts you need to clean, you will end up doing it outside with a pot blaster.  The confined cabinet is nice for small objects.  It make them easier to find when they slip out of your grip.


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#6 trowel OFFLINE  

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Posted March 06, 2014 - 05:45 PM

I would suggest have a larger storage tank for the air that little tank on the compressor isn't ideal for blasting the pump an engine is more than enough an then some but you will run into the fact that it will run continually because there is really no significant storage tank I have a 5hp two stage piston driven compressor that's 220v single phase it has a 80gallon tank it will blast for a few minutes then it kicks on an takes about 5-8mins to build back up while continuing to blast before it shuts back off I was told by the compressor dealer where I got mine that when blasting you want a good size tank an a compressor that is capable of building back up an shutting down while blasting if not you are putting a lot if wear an tear on the compressor Just my two cents!

The question is not if my compressor can do it.

For a twin cylinder single stage compressor pumping 25 CFM at 125 PSI through a 3/8 hose continually is very high for a 2,250 rpm unit from the early 70's. Now days you would need the dual stage compressor powered by a 16 hp engine to keep up.

This compressor was seen mounted on the side of a utility truck with a 20 gallon pressure pot next to it sandblasting bridges, guardrails and the likes so it was made for it. It can and will power a 60 lb paving breaker or two 30 lb air hammers for road work, in reality it does not even need the tanks and a lot of them were mounted and used without the tanks.

 

Usually when i sandblast it is outside wearing full ppe so as careful as can be, would love to hear of and see the set up you guys are using for ideas of my own set up.


Edited by trowel, March 06, 2014 - 05:46 PM.


#7 gunstuff1000 ONLINE  

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Posted March 07, 2014 - 07:47 AM

The question is not if my compressor can do it.
For a twin cylinder single stage compressor pumping 25 CFM at 125 PSI through a 3/8 hose continually is very high for a 2,250 rpm unit from the early 70's. Now days you would need the dual stage compressor powered by a 16 hp engine to keep up.
This compressor was seen mounted on the side of a utility truck with a 20 gallon pressure pot next to it sandblasting bridges, guardrails and the likes so it was made for it. It can and will power a 60 lb paving breaker or two 30 lb air hammers for road work, in reality it does not even need the tanks and a lot of them were mounted and used without the tanks.
 
Usually when i sandblast it is outside wearing full ppe so as careful as can be, would love to hear of and see the set up you guys are using for ideas of my own set up.

I never said your compressor was adequate enough. Good way of looking at it is when blasting is like cutting the end off the air hose your just continuously pumping air Your compressor is more than large enough trust me never doubted that I will just keep my mouth shut I was only giving my opinions from my experience
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#8 trowel OFFLINE  

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Posted March 07, 2014 - 08:03 AM

I never said your compressor was adequate enough. Good way of looking at it is when blasting is like cutting the end off the air hose your just continuously pumping air Your compressor is more than large enough trust me never doubted that I will just keep my mouth shut I was only giving my opinions from my experience

No, please give your opinions, i see my fault now and apologize, must of read too quickly and missed what you typed.

I have had to prove a few people wrong when they laughed at the compressor so i become very quickly defensive of it, good machine.

 

You are right with the larger tank, the Lindsay compressor is a gas hog with the large cube displacment and parts are NLA for both the compressor and engine so on demand air sounds good, any and all ideas/pictures are welcomed, homemade or store bought, including yours :thumbs:


Edited by trowel, March 07, 2014 - 08:04 AM.

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#9 trowel OFFLINE  

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Posted March 07, 2014 - 05:18 PM

Turned into a dead thread,.....



#10 New.Canadian.DB.Owner OFFLINE  

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Posted March 07, 2014 - 10:27 PM

I hadn't thought about building a propane tank unit.  Been looking on the web, and I agree: They look do-able (except for the "blow yourself to China" aspect of cutting into a used propane tank).  Surely someone out there has done it or used one.  Are they any good?


Edited by New.Canadian.DB.Owner, March 07, 2014 - 10:29 PM.

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#11 Sawdust ONLINE  

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Posted March 08, 2014 - 12:06 AM

I had thoughts of building one too until I saw how often they pop up on CL. Trowel look on youtube for " DIY Sand Blasting Cabinets" you will find a lot of ideas on there. Let us know what you come up with.


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#12 trowel OFFLINE  

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Posted March 08, 2014 - 07:51 AM

I see several cheap 8 gallon ones on CL right now along with some cabinets, might give them a call.

 

Modified propane tanks into a lot of things, 30 lb to 120 lb, plenty of outdated ones kicking around. Propane fired forge, propane fired aluminum furnace, cupola furnace, coal/wood stoves, fuel tanks, oil tanks, reservoir tanks, etc...

 

Small hand held ones turned into mufflers or expansion chambers for 2-smokes.

 

Steel is (old tanks) high grade carbon spring steel, easy to weld.

 

Old water heaters are great too, built a stove or two out of them.


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#13 jdcrawler OFFLINE  

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Posted March 08, 2014 - 03:07 PM

About 30 years ago, I built my own blasting cabinet using an old fuel oil tank.

I originally built it with a front panel that opened up to place the parts in.

That got to be a pain in the back lifting the parts thru that opening so I cut an opening into the side and it works really great now.

 

The rubber gloves with the long sleeves were from an industral supply.

 

There is a 75W light bulb just above the sight glass and a fan on the top to pull the dust out and keep the inside clear.

Air is drawn in thru holes in the bottom of the door on the side.

There is also an air tube mounted in the front next to the sight glass so air is drawn in to help keep the sight glass clear.

This is made from sink drain pipe.

 

The sight glass slips into a groove at the top and is held in place with a metal bracket on the bottom so the glass can be easily replaced.

 

Old metal refrigator grille shelves are used for the rack to set the parts on.

This rack has a sheet of expanded aluminum mesh laid on top of it so smaller parts do not fall thru the rack.

 

 

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Edited by jdcrawler, March 08, 2014 - 03:19 PM.

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#14 Sawdust ONLINE  

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Posted March 08, 2014 - 05:40 PM

I made a snow plow from a water heater tank. It worked for many years. Jd now I'm inspired to make one again. The HF I have like Trowel mentioned is small but I like it best because I got it so cheap. I like the exhaust fan you got, is that a blower fan?

#15 trowel OFFLINE  

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Posted March 10, 2014 - 10:19 PM

Getting a few ideas now, thanks JD, that is neat.

Sometime i just enjoy building things rather then buying it.

 

I made a snow plow from a water heater tank. It worked for many years. Jd now I'm inspired to make one again. The HF I have like Trowel mentioned is small but I like it best because I got it so cheap. I like the exhaust fan you got, is that a blower fan?

My ditcher blade is too.


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