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Sandblasting Help


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#1 Bob IN OFFLINE  

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Posted March 05, 2014 - 09:11 PM

In the next few months dad and I are going to go in together on a blasting cabinet.  I have been looking at sandblasting media. I never realized how many types there were. I would like do blast sheet metal, and also cast iron. What types of media do you all use? Im thinking two types. Walnut shells, it seems like that would be beter for sheet metal work. And aluminum oxide for the cast iron. Any thoughts, comments, or help would be great. Thank you.


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#2 superaben OFFLINE  

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Posted March 05, 2014 - 09:19 PM

I don't do any sandblasting, but the guy who does my work for me always swears by walnut shells for everything. 

 

Ben W.


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#3 Sawdust OFFLINE  

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Posted March 05, 2014 - 09:22 PM

What cabinet are you looking at. I bought one on CL....the one from Harbor Freight. It's worked out nice with a little tweeking, light & a dust collector. I used Aluminum Oxide for most everything. I did find out TSC has Black Beauty a lot cheaper than HF. I've never used Walnut Shells.
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#4 superspeedex OFFLINE  

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Posted March 05, 2014 - 09:24 PM

Black beauty


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#5 petrj6 ONLINE  

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Posted March 05, 2014 - 09:36 PM

    Black beauty is pretty aggressive when new, but after awhile it gives a nice smooth finish.  also you need a pretty good sandblaster to use black beauty.  I have had very good luck with star blast, I get it from work so I have no idea the cost, but you can use it on everything including aluminum and stainless and it will not cause it to rust like black beauty will plus it holds up  a while before it breaks down to dust.


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#6 gopher OFFLINE  

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Posted March 05, 2014 - 09:56 PM

    Black beauty is pretty aggressive when new, but after awhile it gives a nice smooth finish.  also you need a pretty good sandblaster to use black beauty.  I have had very good luck with star blast, I get it from work so I have no idea the cost, but you can use it on everything including aluminum and stainless and it will not cause it to rust like black beauty will plus it holds up  a while before it breaks down to dust.

How does cinder make it rust any faster than sand or shell on bare metal?


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#7 gunstuff1000 OFFLINE  

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Posted March 05, 2014 - 09:57 PM

I started out using garnet but I have since switched to that black beauty stuff or whatever it is that menards sells it's a coal slag type product When it comes to sandblasting I have learned most crucial thing is to have a large compressor nothing smaller than one that will produce 15cfm at 90psi or so needs to be a oil lubricated piston pump you will burn up any of those diaphragm type compressors My experience with the cheaper brand cabinets is they usually have leaks If your going to be planning on blasting a lot I suggest going with a good brand something american made an stay away from the china made cabinets I went with the ace brand they are built in holland Michigan they also have a very nice soda blaster that is very handy it's small portable unit about the size of a fire extinguisher but these work perfect for blasting engines, rear ends an gear boxes on these garden tractors Baking soda will clean off grease where any other blasting media doesn't do well on grease plus soda dissolves an will not harm the engine or anything else Just my opinion
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#8 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted March 05, 2014 - 10:47 PM

No matter what media you use if it is humid or dew sits on blasted metal it will flash rust overnight

When I blasted in the factory we used silica blasting sand. It did pretty well and could be recycled several times.

They did try a truckload of garnet, but until it had been nearly worn out it would leave sheet metal so rough (raspy) that it had to be polished with sanders before it could be painted.

I am not familiar with black beauty, but the description makes me wonder if it is not slag from iron smelting?


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#9 Bill 76 OFFLINE  

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Posted March 06, 2014 - 03:03 AM

Black beauty is coal slag from boilers.


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#10 petrj6 ONLINE  

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Posted March 06, 2014 - 05:46 AM

    BILL 76  is correct, black beauty is coal based and has carbon in it, so things that will already rust is makes no difference but if you use it to blast stainless or aluminum, stuff that will not naturally rust the black beauty will put carbon in the material and cause it to rust if you don't paint over it.  Say you use it to clean aluminum rims, then leave them uncoated they will generate a thin coat of rust the first time they get damp.


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#11 Bob IN OFFLINE  

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Posted March 06, 2014 - 07:07 AM

What cabinet are you looking at. .

Were looking at a cabinet from tp tools. Good brand?



#12 HANKG OFFLINE  

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Posted March 06, 2014 - 07:12 AM

SODA

#13 trowel OFFLINE  

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Posted March 06, 2014 - 07:14 AM

As Bill 76 stated, coal slag, like it too and it seems that when reused several times it makes a finer finish from being worked down to small beads.

Walnut is a fav of mines but expensive, does really good on thick layered paint and can be used outside and disposed off outside being made of walnut shells.


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#14 Sawdust OFFLINE  

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Posted March 06, 2014 - 07:42 AM

TP does have nice stuff. I like their smaller shop cabinets. I don't normally buy a lot of stuff at HF but I got this one almost for nothing on CL. You have raised my curiosity on the Walnut Shells. I do use soda on carbs as well. Good points on the coal slag causing rust on aluminum. My GT was in bad shape as far as rust & Hammerite paint, that paint was brutal getting off. The larger stuff I use a pressure pot in a make shift plastic enclosure outside & recycle the media & of coarse all the safety gear on as well.



#15 glgrumpy ONLINE  

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Posted March 06, 2014 - 08:08 AM

Well, I've used Black Beauty and it does leave metal kinda roughish. Also turns into a brown dust in short time. I usually just use Silica Sand that usually says "Not for sandblasting" right on bag. Think it's some Liability thing to say that. I use TP parts. I built the cabinet out of plywood and their plans. Made window bigger and also made full 48" wide. All from one piece of 3/4" plywood. Used some Metal inside on back and left side. Get the expensive Hardened tip kit. It's  about $50, but lasts long time and the other metal or ceramic tips go real fast. BIG compressor needed. I have 6 hp and 60 gallon and it runs constant if I'm doing lots of blasting. Need the good dust vacumn too. I'm using a shop vac on mine and not so good, clogs filter fast. Constantly cleaning that off. TP has a vac unit I want to get and try, should be better. Need lots of lights. Flurescent doesn't work. I have TWO 100 watt spots or floods in mine, one pointed each way. BUT, if you bump them with a part, the blow out. Getting harder to find those kinds of bulbs now. Maybe the LED''s would work?  Not sure what you need in them. The Bulbs get all frosty looking and dull too after awhile. I have for window a safety glass layer, then use a plexiglass inside that, THEN use the good thicker window plastic taped to the plexiglass that I can buy by the foot and cut to fit. I started with just plexi-glass and it worked, but was more money and doesn't last long time. The window plastic lasts some longer, till the compound starts getting dusty, then it fades faster and attracks the dust I think. I made my window hinge so I can unlock and swing up to remove the plastics quick and put back easy. The main glass stays in frame.

  Would think Walnut shells wouldn't last for painted parts and heavy rust. They are for delicate materials. Soda is kinda new, but requires diff system components and I would think is messy, not sure. Good moisture filters on air line is must. Even with them, sometimes you just gotta stop awhile and let it dry out.  Gun parts will wear out and need replacement at times. The sand wears paths thru them right around the tips and seals.   My Buddy got a great big TP tool one, big enough for whole reare-end to fit in. He started using Glass Beads and he says is real smooth finish. He likes to polish things too after blasting.  I get a back-ache and hurting wrist if I blast an afternoon, it wears you out to stand there long and hold that trigger and move gun around. They have a foot control that may be better, but I've never tried, seems expensive for what it does. That's my observations and experiences with mine.






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