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Ford :lgt 145 Hydraulic Question


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#1 nycub122 OFFLINE  

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Posted March 01, 2014 - 06:24 AM

Thinking of a redesign of the hydraulic system on my 1976 Ford LGT 145 open-sided "Dream Machine" project. Currently has a in-line hydraulic fluid filter, which I want to change to a spin-on filter. Also, would like to change the single spool control valve to a 2 spool valve, which would be mounted on the right side fender.

Question: Why are steel lines used from the hydro to the control valve and from the control valve to the filter and back to the hydro, yet rubber hoses are used from the control valve to the lift cylinder? Can hoses be used for the entire hydraulic system?

Any thoughts or comments would be appreciated.

Thanks

GEL



#2 KennyP OFFLINE  

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Posted March 01, 2014 - 06:51 AM

I think that using steel lines to the filter meant they didn't have to support it. I see no problem with changing them.



#3 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted March 01, 2014 - 06:53 AM

I'll take a shot at this although I'm not an expert in hydraulics. The cylinder body will move a bit and depending on the linkage may pivot and have some side to side movement. That's why you need to use hoses in that application. Why they use steel lines? I think there are a number of reasons. They are cheaper, especially in a mass production job. They take up less space and can be given a tighter turning radius then a hose would be 2 other reasons I can think of quickly. You can certainly use hoses throughout the system but you need to make sure they can't sag or otherwise move and get pinched or chafed by a driveshaft or lift linkage etc. 


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#4 IamSherwood OFFLINE  

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Posted March 01, 2014 - 08:21 AM

No reason you can't use hoses that I can think of.

I agree with Brian's reasons that steel was used. I think hose technology has

come a long way since back then, just avoid tight bends, especially close to the

crimped fittings. That's the most likely place for failure. I've done a fair fit of

playing around with hydraulics, using hoses, and am going to get myself set

up to use steel lines where I can for my next project. I think everything can

be made much more compact, using steel lines, and cheaper too. Less

fittings needed to adapt, or redirect a line.



#5 skyrydr2 OFFLINE  

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Posted March 01, 2014 - 08:41 AM

This is easy, when you go buy the hoses for your project you will soon see why they used tube ;-) WAY WAY less money.
On my 165 I used as steel tube as would fit!! One it looks cleaner and fittings and bends as stated before are much tighter. When you spec you valve be sure it has Tight tolerances(% of leak at ports) or your apps will sag all the time... This is a pain because you always need to ajust them.
I actually only use the trans charge pump for powersteering all the rest is done with an auxiliary pump( power steering pump off a Toyota Camry) and has a seperate resivior.
This was done for a few reasons; more power, 2; more volume=speed, 3; oil seperation for forien attachments in case of a leak it would not affect the hydro.
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#6 nycub122 OFFLINE  

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Posted March 08, 2014 - 05:59 AM

Thanks for the comments and suggestions.

What diameter are the steel lines?

Are the fittings flare fittings? If so, do they use a double flare (as in automotive brake lines)?

Can I make/bend the steel lines myself, or are the bends so tight that I have to use pre-formed lines?

Thanks to all

GEL



#7 skyrydr2 OFFLINE  

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Posted March 08, 2014 - 11:11 AM

The flare is a single 37° flare with a flare ring in the female fitting. Very easy to make. For these rigs 3/8" brake tubing will work just fine.




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