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When Does A Repair Become "not Economically Viable"


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#1 New.Canadian.DB.Owner OFFLINE  

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Posted February 28, 2014 - 04:52 PM

I just spent $50 getting a chipped pulley welded.  It's a double pulley that goes on a 1" shaft.  Nothing that couldn't be jury-rigged, but it is the original drive pulley on my Waterloo 40.  I could not buy an OEM replacement if I wanted.  They just never come up.  Once they are separated from the machine, they are just a double pulley.  

 

That got me thinking: When is enough, too much?  I mean, I'm $650 into repairing a $300 tractor, but each repair has been "cheap".  There has just been a ton of them.

 

What factors do you consider when deciding to scrap or repair?


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#2 petrj6 ONLINE  

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Posted February 28, 2014 - 05:14 PM

     I never scrap, If it is old and usable I fix it.  I have way more invested in any of my machines than they are worth and will never get the cash back out of them.  it is a labor of love. 


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#3 EricFromPa ONLINE  

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Posted February 28, 2014 - 05:22 PM

Older machinery can always be fixed as long as it's Bones are strong.The newer machinery really has no Bones and can be repaired only a couple times before your replacing the whole machine.

 

I would take 1 fixable broken older machine over 10 new fancy looking machines any day of the week.


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#4 farmerall OFFLINE  

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Posted February 28, 2014 - 05:57 PM

Normally I will only use one for parts if I buy it cheap and it will cost more than it will be worth after it's repaired. If the machine has personal value too me then I will fix it. The only parts I scrap and the ones that will never sell and also the frames, I keep a lot of the same parts and anything else I think I might need in the future.


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#5 Sawdust OFFLINE  

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Posted February 28, 2014 - 05:58 PM

I agree there isn't much out there that can't be fixed. It all depends on how much you love your project. It's obvious we would never get what we have paid repairing or restoring. I'm new to the hobby & have four GT's now. There's three that I have to restore original but the latest one I'm going to do what ever it takes to get it the way I want it. I think the reward at the end of the day is knowing we rescued a part of American history & the satisfaction of showing the before & after pics. It sounds like your doing what most of us would do.  :thumbs:


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#6 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted February 28, 2014 - 06:13 PM

Good question. I restored a JD317 last year that was in really bad shape. I spent a fair bit on it but not enough to make me want to scrap it. A 317 is a rare best here so I don't think it was a bad decision to save it.  Once I get involved in a restoration I'm going to see it through. You need to pick your tractors though. I knew that a 317, while rare here, was popular enough to make used parts a viable option. It also shares a lot of parts with other 300 series tractors. There are still a fair number of new parts available from JD as well. That said, I'll be looking for something in much better shape for my next project. 


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#7 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted February 28, 2014 - 07:40 PM

Well, sometimes an old but good welder can be bought for $50.  If you bought a welder, then practiced a bit, with help from others on this forum, you could weld your own stuff, like that pulley.  Then you'd end up repairing lots of your stuff without paying others.  That's one way to avoid the "too much" syndrome.  BUT, no matter what, if you love what you end up with, and it makes you happy, then investment is not part of the equation.


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#8 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted February 28, 2014 - 07:52 PM

I hear what you're saying about the outlay. I have some for parts and some for use. I plan on restoring a couple, but they give me such joy as survivors and workers that I may never get to it.

I do want to do a restore on Ryan's It deserves it. Maybe next year, we will see.

#9 petrj6 ONLINE  

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Posted February 28, 2014 - 08:03 PM

      How the heck do you quote!!!!!  I tried two or three times and it would not work.  I agree with oldcowhand, learn how to do it yourself and it will be much more rewarding and cheaper!!!!!!!!!  $50 to repair a chipped pulley seems a bit hi but hey everyone has to make a living.  get yourself an old stick welder and a box of MG600 , set up some practice pieces and have at it, MG600 is great for all metals and welds super nice, just remember to go slow and take your time.

      I love to weld and would be happy to coach anyone thru the process.


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#10 coldone OFFLINE  

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Posted February 28, 2014 - 08:08 PM

Depends on the purpose of the machine and what you are gona do with it. If you are repairing it so you can flip it and make money, then you cant put alot into it. If you are doing for the shear pleasure of doing it then have fun. All of mine have been for use and fun. Half the fun for me is to figure out how to do it on the cheap but right. My latest project (diesel 1650) is just for fun and use, I am having fun solving the problems and hunting down the best deals.I will never get my money back out of it but hopefully i will get years of use.


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#11 KennyP OFFLINE  

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Posted February 28, 2014 - 08:10 PM

      How the heck do you quote!!!!!  I tried two or three times and it would not work.  I agree with oldcowhand, learn how to do it yourself and it will be much more rewarding and cheaper!!!!!!!!!  $50 to repair a chipped pulley seems a bit hi but hey everyone has to make a living.  get yourself an old stick welder and a box of MG600 , set up some practice pieces and have at it, MG600 is great for all metals and welds super nice, just remember to go slow and take your time.

      I love to weld and would be happy to coach anyone thru the process.

Just click on the 'Quote' button at the bottom of a post. That's what I did here to quote you.



#12 classic ONLINE  

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Posted February 28, 2014 - 08:10 PM

I think a big part of it has to do with how much tinkering around with repairing parts you want to do. I've seen people tear tractors down, start a restoration, then get overwhelmed by the project. On the flip side, I've seen completed nut and bolt restorations that took many hours to complete. If a good used part is available and cheap, I would most likely just buy the used part and repair the damaged part to have as a spare. I'm going through this right now with the 68' Suburban 12 a friend gave me. The hole in the idler assembly for the clutch rod is worn badly, and I can find an excellent used assembly for 20 bucks. In this case, I'll buy the excellent used part and repair the old one at a later date if need be. Spring is coming (I think?) and I want to get this tractor restored and put it to use, so time is also a big factor.
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#13 Chopperhed OFFLINE  

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Posted February 28, 2014 - 09:05 PM

The way I look at it, its my hobby money, what I do with it, how much I spend, where it goes, it all irrelevant. My house is almost mine, my bills are paid, my job is secure, I'm getting ahead, and have a good amount of time left in life. I have no kids, no parents, and my sibs are doing OK.

My hobby money is mine to do with as I wish. Airplanes, cars, bikes, tractors, computers, etc. Its hobby money, meant to be blown on what ever makes you happy.

What makes me happy is working in the shop, hanging with my dog, and enjoying a few beverages. Building/rebuilding stuff is the icing on the cake.

The rest is just filler.

For me the joy is doing it, the cost is secondary. I'd spend 1000 to fix a 300 tractor if it kept me busy, and entertained.
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#14 glgrumpy OFFLINE  

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Posted March 01, 2014 - 02:10 AM

All of mine should be or should have been scrapped or parted!  Can't make money on resales!  I just like to make it work again and bring me happiness and sense of acheivement.  I have done big MM tractors and had around for years, no uses for them, but knew them very well. I have now passed on two of them  and maybe gonna try to sell one more this summer. Have one left to put more time and effort into then. GT's just kinda come and go here. When they are done is worst time. They are not used and just in the way, you begin to dis-like them. That's when they go to swap meets and you'll take whatever you can get to not bring them back home and take up all your space in garage. 

 

Man, feel like I just told the biggest Lies of my Life, Ha!   :hitting_self_roller: :loosing_it:



#15 Bolens 1000 ONLINE  

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Posted March 01, 2014 - 08:13 AM

Its just part of hobby you cant worry too much about.

No matter what you do, buying replacement parts will always end up costing more than what the machine is worth (Especially if you own the machine for years)

Same goes for the $600 Lawn mowers you buy, a carburetor can set you back around $100 and a starter about the same so your already almost 1/2 way into what a new machine would cost, that's just the way it works and has always been that way.


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