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Lawn Mower Blade Balancing


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#16 Bill 76 ONLINE  

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Posted February 27, 2014 - 10:08 PM

But what if you have a "star" shaped hole?

Ya gotta get the star shaped nail----------------I'll poke my eyes out for you :poke:  Sorry I just couldn't help it.


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#17 trowel OFFLINE  

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Posted February 27, 2014 - 10:12 PM

:bigrofl:


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#18 grnspot110 OFFLINE  

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Posted February 27, 2014 - 10:16 PM

The nail method works fine.  Some of the older JD manuals recommended it for their blades!  ~~  Lowell


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#19 Jack OFFLINE  

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Posted February 27, 2014 - 10:32 PM

Hey Trowel you tossed your plastic one in the trash too? I would pound a nail in the wall before I would buy another plastic one.


Yeah, nail in the wall is what I use.
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#20 superaben OFFLINE  

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Posted February 27, 2014 - 11:03 PM

Jesse is right, use only an aluminum (or zinc) cone otherwise "you'll be sorry!"  I had a plastic one someone had ordered from me come out of the bag unbalanced from the get go. 

 

Have you ever seen these things? 

 

750-050_Z.jpg

 

They are expensive as heck but they sure work great if you are that picky.  Personally, I found the time it takes to make the blade 100% perfect is usually wasted.  The blade is out of balance again before too long in most situations.  I have used the fancy style and I do like it, but the old tried and true cone style works good.

 

FWIW, I can get those simple metal cone style balancers and sell them for $4.50 each.  The fancy doohickey retails for $277 per shot.  If someone really is that much of a perfectionist I'd be glad to sell you one for a good bit less.  $239.  :wave:

 

And I sell the vintage balancers too.  $10 each.  Handcrafted out of genuine 2x4 scraps, one salvage nail out of the nearest tumble down bank barn.  For $11 I'll even put in a mounting hole.  Ya'll can't beat that can you?

 

Ben W,


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#21 GWest OFFLINE  

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Posted February 28, 2014 - 07:28 AM

Mount a pilot bearing from a wood router bit on the wall that matches the blade hole diameter. These bearings have a very light lubricant so are very sensitive to the balance and center the blade on the pivot point. Far better than a nail or cone balancer. A nail not centered in the blade is using a good portion of the blade's weight as a pendulum which masks part of the unbalanced condition.

 

Garry


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#22 sodisr OFFLINE  

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Posted February 28, 2014 - 09:12 AM

trying to perfect balance a blade is a waste of time..  No one mentioned any rust or grass clippings that are hardened to the blade..

 

To get it perfect you would almost need to polish the blade and free it up from any  particles that do not belong .

 

I do use the cone method... but between mowings,, debree and dried grass will collect after every mowing session..leaving the blade not perfect AGAIN


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#23 TAHOE OFFLINE  

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Posted February 28, 2014 - 09:23 AM

What's this "blade balancing" you all are talking about ...... :watch_over_fence:  :smilewink:


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#24 GWest OFFLINE  

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Posted March 04, 2014 - 09:52 PM

trying to perfect balance a blade is a waste of time..  No one mentioned any rust or grass clippings that are hardened to the blade..
 
To get it perfect you would almost need to polish the blade and free it up from any  particles that do not belong .
 
I do use the cone method... but between mowings,, debree and dried grass will collect after every mowing session..leaving the blade not perfect AGAIN


Have never seen more rust or grass stains on one half of a blade than the other to throw the balance off.
Any blade that has come back to me for resharpening is still balanced.
The biggest cause of unbalance is inconsistent grinding to sharpen them. You try to grind both ends the same but you can't maintain the balance. Find the heavy end after it is sharp and a pass or two with the grinder and it is balanced again.
Since I started doing this about 15 years ago have had no more deck shells cracked around the spindle housings and bearing failures are almost non existent. This includes the newer deck shells that are even thinner.
The most common comment from owners is the mower has never run that smooth or quiet. They just can't remember how smooth they where when new.
I always check new blades and have never found one out of balance. The largest being a 1/2" thick, 2-1/2" wide and 30" long Gravely blade.

Garry
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#25 Gabriel OFFLINE  

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Posted March 04, 2014 - 09:56 PM

Have never seen more rust or grass stains on one half of a blade than the other to throw the balance off.
Any blade that has come back to me for resharpening is still balanced.
The biggest cause of unbalance is inconsistent grinding to sharpen them. You try to grind both ends the same but you can't maintain the balance. Find the heavy end after it is sharp and a pass or two with the grinder and it is balanced again.
Since I started doing this about 15 years ago have had no more deck shells cracked around the spindle housings and bearing failures are almost non existent. This includes the newer deck shells that are even thinner.
The most common comment from owners is the mower has never run that smooth or quiet. They just can't remember how smooth they where when new.
I always check new blades and have never found one out of balance. The largest being a 1/2" thick, 2-1/2" wide and 30" long Gravely blade.

Garry

How do you check the balance on the blades you sharpen?



#26 GWest OFFLINE  

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Posted March 05, 2014 - 04:10 AM

How do you check the balance on the blades you sharpen?


I use $3-5$ router pilot bearings mounted on a small stand. 3/8" OD, 1/2" OD, 5/8" OD, 3/4" OD and 7/8" OD so far. Since it works I doubled them up with a small washer between the bearings for a larger area to sit the blade on.
 

Mount a pilot bearing from a wood router bit on the wall that matches the blade hole diameter. These bearings have a very light lubricant so are very sensitive to the balance and center the blade on the pivot point. Far better than a nail or cone balancer. A nail not centered in the blade is using a good portion of the blade's weight as a pendulum which masks part of the unbalanced condition.


I clamp the blades in a vise afair that holds the ground edge horizontal. I can consistantly hold and operate a 7" angle grinder in the horizontal position but can't at a 45 degree angle. Helps to get both ends ground the same.

Garry

Edited by GWest, March 05, 2014 - 04:21 AM.

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#27 UncleWillie ONLINE  

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Posted March 05, 2014 - 08:31 PM

Blade balancing can be a big waste of time around here. With the scrap metal business, 2 dogs, a toddler, a forgetful wife, and my own personal mental dysfunction a blade can be unbalanced in a half a lap of the yard. Nothing like having freshly sharpened blades and then finding a large bolt, piece of steel, matchbox car, or something else that got drug halfway across the yard.


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#28 trowel OFFLINE  

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Posted March 06, 2014 - 08:29 AM

I have a two kind of sharpeners, both Ideals from the 60's.

One is a bedknife sharpener/grinder that uses the horizontally mounted cone stone directly mounted to the motor which i use for mower blades, baler knifes and anything needing an edge. the carriage is adjustible for any bevel/angle and with different stones it can used as a face grinder.

It is kind of like a Milling machine but for grinding and quickly became a go to multi tool until i accidentally used the threaded nut used to hold on the stone which i forgot to screw back on on a muffler for a job :wallbanging:  last year so i had to sharpen the baler knifes with a angle grinder instead :( what ever works,.....

 

The other is a pedestal mounted reel and bedknife sharpener use just for reel mowers, belt driven vertically mounted stone, grind push and gas powered mowers up to 36 inches long without having to remove the reel.


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