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Thinking About Powder Coating


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#1 thom OFFLINE  

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Posted February 27, 2014 - 07:47 PM

I'm thinking that I'd like to have some parts on my Simplicity 728 restoration project powder-coated. I had in mind the wheels and the engine tin. The front wheels and eng tin are not shown in the photo.

728disassembledIII_zps79ec71bb.jpeg


Edited by thom, February 27, 2014 - 08:00 PM.

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#2 Sawdust OFFLINE  

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Posted February 27, 2014 - 08:08 PM

PC is getting real popular lately. I met a guy back in the summer & he PC motorcycle frames. He got me real interested because it's not that complicated with small parts. Having a heat source or a box for baking is mostly the problem with the larger parts. Keep us posted.


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#3 Bill 76 OFFLINE  

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Posted February 27, 2014 - 08:17 PM

I would not even think of doing the whole engine.First off it would have to be compleately taken apart down to the bare block then most power coaters sand or bead blast down to bare metal and you will be picking the grit out of every nook and bolt hole for days and still not get it all out.Plus the blasting could damage some machined surfaces.

Just clean the engine good and find the color you want in a ratttle can and mask it off and paint it.It will last a long time except maybe by exauste port.

I remember reading in the forum awile back about painting engines,lots of good info.

Save yourself a head ache---------just my 2 cents.


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#4 Chopperhed OFFLINE  

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Posted February 27, 2014 - 08:28 PM

I did a fair bit of powder coating a few years back.

The Eastwood kit and an old electric oven work great for smaller stuff. A clean dry air supply is a must, as well as a breeze free booth. Custom colours can be ordered from several spots. We have black white and silver in 50lb boxes. I've done some other colours as well, but only in the one or two pieces at a time.Only needs a minimal 3 psi air supply, parts need to reach 400F for 20 minutes or so, IIRC, to cure properly, parts must be squeaky clean and free of fingerprints.

We used a standard kitchen oven for all our small parts. Any thing that can be hung can be cured.

We also have a 6000 watt 480V Infrared heater as well, but being directional, it takes constant attention and rotation during cure to get a good coat.

A lot of local shops use the process now days. Our Fab shop has an oven big enough for a car, or a 20' skid shack. you may want to source out your larger parts to a pro if you want bigger stuff done.

When properly done, it's a very nice durable coating, and custom effects can be done if you know how.
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#5 Talntedmrgreen OFFLINE  

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Posted February 27, 2014 - 09:31 PM

I like the finish of PC, and think you are on the right track putting it in places where it's unlikely to see wear of damage.  That stuff gives up the ghost fast if it chips or wears through, and it cannot be touched up like paint can.


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#6 Newpaws493 OFFLINE  

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Posted February 27, 2014 - 11:37 PM

saw this listed this week...

ov2.jpg

 

Powder coat business - $3500 (Ct)

 

 

Goodluck!


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#7 Canawler OFFLINE  

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Posted February 28, 2014 - 09:09 AM

A question for those who have powder coated items.  What temperature can it withstand before re-melting?  Just wondering if it would work on any engine tins directly above the head as the OP intends.

 

My problem with powder coating is that once it chips off anywhere, you can expect it to peel off in large sheets.  I've always assumed this was do to improper prep work but it seem to be a pretty widespread problem with just about any PC items I've dealt with.  It doesn't seem to have anywhere near the adhesion properties of a good paint.


Edited by Canawler, February 28, 2014 - 09:10 AM.

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#8 T Guiles OFFLINE  

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Posted February 28, 2014 - 10:41 AM

I've powder coated a seat pan for a project and am very happy with the finish, is that an old Studebaker in the back ground?



#9 Chopperhed OFFLINE  

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Posted February 28, 2014 - 08:54 PM

A question for those who have powder coated items.  What temperature can it withstand before re-melting?  Just wondering if it would work on any engine tins directly above the head as the OP intends.
 
My problem with powder coating is that once it chips off anywhere, you can expect it to peel off in large sheets.  I've always assumed this was do to improper prep work but it seem to be a pretty widespread problem with just about any PC items I've dealt with.  It doesn't seem to have anywhere near the adhesion properties of a good paint.



#10 thom OFFLINE  

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Posted February 28, 2014 - 09:41 PM

TGuiles, yes that is a 1955 Studebaker half-ton that I'm resurrecting . It is now on a 1987 Dodge Dakota frame & suspension. I plan to use a 305 engine and 700R4 trans out of a '91 Caprice that I have. My have two grandsons whos last name is Coffey so ...coffeybros_zps4c0869ac.jpeg


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