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What Kind Of Tomatoes


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#1 Gabriel OFFLINE  

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Posted February 21, 2014 - 10:20 PM

What kind of tomatoes are you all growing this year? I'm growing Martino's Roma, Wisconsin 55, Delicious, Mountain Magic, Ultimate Opener, Kosovo and Sunset's Red Horizon(I think that's what it's called). We canned salsa last year for the first time and I hope to do much more this year.


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#2 Gabriel OFFLINE  

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Posted February 21, 2014 - 10:22 PM

Oh, here's my new salsa helper.

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#3 hamman ONLINE  

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Posted February 21, 2014 - 11:09 PM

Early girl, Big Roma and another one the wife wants to get. Our tomatoes did well last year but they were so very late !  Not sure wht we did to make them come in really late but they did. Made some salsa and put up a few jars of stewed tomatoes.  Good Luck.    Roger.


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#4 Nato77 OFFLINE  

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Posted February 21, 2014 - 11:11 PM

In the past years we've used beef master, roma, lemon boy, large cherry and early girl. We made about 4 1/2 gallons last year which isn't going to last til we can make more. It always sucks buying salsa from the store, it never tastes as good. Also did 20 pints of tomato sauce and 10 pints of pizza sauce.

We just use a food processor to grind up the veggies. I haven't seen a "sauce maker" like that before. Hope it works good for you!


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#5 oldedeeres ONLINE  

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Posted February 22, 2014 - 12:02 AM

Last year we had Bush Early Girl, Celebrity, Prairie Pride,  Dutchess,  Starfire,  and Mountain Merit. The Mountain Merit were very pricy as I recall, about $6.00 for 10 seeds, supposed to be late blight resistant, ( that was why we tried them) but they developed blight anyway, and were very late maturing to boot. They were huge tomatoes, and are indeterminate and sprawled all over even when staked, but the ones we managed to eat   were delicious and juicy. We ended up with about 100 quarts each of juice and canned tomatoes, 40 pints of salsa, dehydrated a whole bunch, and the comment at every meal for two months was " eat your obligation tomato"--- breakfast included, lol. We only grow that many every other year, and concentrate on something different the next year. Last year was drying beans and tomatoes, this year may be green and yellow beans for canning. 


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#6 hamman ONLINE  

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Posted February 22, 2014 - 08:58 AM

The one thing I learned about tomatoes is that when they start growing you need to pinch off the the litle "sucker" sprouts as they grow. This will add the water and nutrients to the main stalk and the rest of the tomatoes on the bush. That is why we don't plant to many plants. I dont know how my brother does it, he plants 50 to 60 plants each year! He always has a great crop of tomatoes and he makes gallons of salsa and stewed tomatoes.Time consuming!  A guy I worked with took the big coffee cans and cut the top and bottom off of them, slipped them around the plant and pushed them down to about 3" above the ground. He then filled them with sawdust and small shavings. Hold the moisture he said. When he ran out of cans I rolled him up some sleeves out of .26ga galvanized steel for him to use.  Thanks. Roger.


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#7 allisb10page OFFLINE  

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Posted February 23, 2014 - 09:48 PM

This year I plan on putting in at least 50 Tanner Hoell's.  They are a beefsteak tomato that works for both sauce and stew canning.  Will also have to have some cherry (maybe a lemon drop or a generic red cherry for something to much on while walking through the gardens).  WIll probably plant a few Desters and maybe and Peach Blow Sutton or two.  I myself plant at least 75 plants each year.  I can ALOT...sauce, marinara, stewed, diced, base(with onion and peppers), soup, and juice.  Large gardens have led to me needing more GT's to make it easier to till and maintain....or at least that's what I tell the wife.... :thumbs:


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#8 Gabriel OFFLINE  

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Posted February 25, 2014 - 10:42 PM

Thanks for sharing everybody! Now we just have to wait for Spring!

#9 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted February 26, 2014 - 07:04 AM

I'm kind of partial to the BIG round red ones myself!


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#10 Copperhead300 OFFLINE  

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Posted February 26, 2014 - 08:42 AM

We plant several different varieties also. But, last year we got the early blight on each and every plant even though each variety was separated by a good distance.

So the first time in 40 years we did not make more than 12 to 15 eatable tomatoes.  Now I am breaking up new ground for just the tomatoes. Hopefully to avoid the early blight.  Having to pay a dollar or more for a can of tomatoes that just does not taste right really hurts my feelings.


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#11 twostep OFFLINE  

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Posted March 03, 2014 - 05:14 PM

Roma and some type of slicing tomatoes... We aren't big on stewed but I love sliced tomatoes and we make salsa and canned spaghetti sauce.

 

I've got a Victorio model 200 and LOVE it. It makes it so easy to make your own tomato sauce. Through the picking season, as you pick tomatoes just toss them in a gallon bag in the freezer. When a bag gets full seal it up and start another. Then when picking is over you thaw them out, quarter them and chuck them in the tomato mill. When you are finished you can run the seeds/rinds through it a second time. It will turn 10 gallons of romas into about a half-gallon of seeds and rinds.

 

I love the freezer method, no loss to rotting, not as many gnats, and you can process all of the tomatoes at once.


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#12 Gabriel OFFLINE  

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Posted March 03, 2014 - 08:15 PM

Roma and some type of slicing tomatoes... We aren't big on stewed but I love sliced tomatoes and we make salsa and canned spaghetti sauce.

 

I've got a Victorio model 200 and LOVE it. It makes it so easy to make your own tomato sauce. Through the picking season, as you pick tomatoes just toss them in a gallon bag in the freezer. When a bag gets full seal it up and start another. Then when picking is over you thaw them out, quarter them and chuck them in the tomato mill. When you are finished you can run the seeds/rinds through it a second time. It will turn 10 gallons of romas into about a half-gallon of seeds and rinds.

 

I love the freezer method, no loss to rotting, not as many gnats, and you can process all of the tomatoes at once.

Thanks! After you process the tomatoes, do you can your sauce?



#13 twostep OFFLINE  

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Posted March 03, 2014 - 10:00 PM

Thanks! After you process the tomatoes, do you can your sauce?

Yeah, we can some plain to use for whatever, use some for salsa and this year we made up a bunch of spaghetti sauce.


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#14 sodisr OFFLINE  

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Posted May 13, 2014 - 09:50 AM

What is your'e favorite eating tomatoes.??  I only have a small garden,, and plant  6--10 tomatoe plants..So we eat most and I love to make salsa.

 

  How do you preserve your'e salsa.?? does it require cooking..


Edited by sodisr, May 13, 2014 - 09:51 AM.

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#15 Gabriel OFFLINE  

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Posted May 14, 2014 - 09:38 PM

What is your'e favorite eating tomatoes.??  I only have a small garden,, and plant  6--10 tomatoe plants..So we eat most and I love to make salsa.

 

  How do you preserve your'e salsa.?? does it require cooking..

We can our salsa. First we chop the tomatoes and other things (jalapenos, onion, spices, vinegar, etc.), then cook it in a pan on the stove for a certain amount of time (trying to get it to a certain consistency), then put it in canning jars and process it in a steam canner. If you want the recipe, let me know. Last year was our first time to can salsa. The recipe we used was good, but the salsa tasted a little to much like a chili for my liking, but it was still good. I will probably look at some other recipes for this year's canning.

 

As for "what is you're favorite eating tomatoes??", probably the best tasting fresh tomato that we have ever grown is Black Krim. I don't think it would be right for salsa though (not the right consistency).


Edited by Gabriel, May 14, 2014 - 09:38 PM.

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