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Flux Core Welder Question


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#16 skyrydr2 ONLINE  

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Posted February 14, 2014 - 06:19 AM

Lincoln and Hitachi make the best flux core wires ! If you get a lot of spatter your feed and heat is not correct! I have a little craftsman 110v welder and it adjusts the current to wire speed fairly well. I don't really have a spatter issue when I use Lincoln wire, the Hobart stuff is just awful oh how I hate that stuff......
Also only clean where your going to weld helps a bit too. The spatter likws to stick really good to fresh steel. Never weld down hill with flux core because the flux will out run the molten metal and pop when the metal gets on it. Always pull the the puddle so the wire looks like it is pushing the puddle back. I know this stinks because you cant always see where your going but its the best way to get the most deposition to your weld.
One trick I use is to always try and weld up hill!! This keeps the flux out and you can see what you are doing much better. On thin stuff I will weld it horizontal. And only do a little at a time.
Also welding thick metal is very hard with a little unit, but you can cheat by heating the weld area with a torch so its almost red hot!! This will allow for awesome penetrating of your weld bead and make it lay flat instead of looking like a rope played on it.
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#17 Alc ONLINE  

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Posted February 14, 2014 - 06:46 AM

Does the flux core wire affected by dampness ? I think I got a roll with my Mig welder but never used it , can't even remember if it was in some kind of sealed package . but those that only use a roll a year does it go   " bad " ?


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#18 skyrydr2 ONLINE  

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Posted February 14, 2014 - 07:05 AM

If it gets rusty..... Its done..... Fluxcore usually has a coating on it, but some does not and as stated if its rusty its going to mess up everything, the feed rolls, liner and tip. This will cause you unbelievable greif.
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#19 Cvans OFFLINE  

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Posted February 14, 2014 - 11:47 AM

As keith stated rust on the wire is bad and it is. On the other hand I by the 10 lb rolls and have never had any corrosion show up on the wire and that shop is not climate controlled. Tried different brands of wire but seem to stick with the Lincoln wire now. He also states that welding up hill is best. This is true but the angle need not be steep. Even a few degrees of incline will help a lot. 

Don't be afraid to experiment with different wire speeds and heat settings. 


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#20 Oldford OFFLINE  

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Posted February 17, 2014 - 09:24 AM

Flux core is considered better in windy conditions, like welding outside/farm/field repairs, the shield won't be dispersed by the wind but is in the wire itself.

If you're limited to 110 volts flux will give more penetration than gas shielding.

If you have 220 then penetration isn't an issue and 220 gas will give very clean welds.

If welding sheet metal you'll see better results with shielding gas and infinite heat adjustment which the cheaper machines don't provide.

I have a 20-year old made in US Century 110, 70amp running flux that welds cleaner and deeper than a newer Lincoln 125amp 'nascar' model which was probably made in Asia. 

I had a 220 Miller running gas that was the best machine i've ever used.  But no longer have 220 so had to sell.  Once I got good with stick I was really impressed with what a small 220 stick welder will do with good rods.  If I ever get 220 in the shop I'll get another small 220 stick welder for the big stuff and keep my little 110 wire for small stuff.

Thanks for the tip on anti-splatter will have to try a can


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#21 Cvans OFFLINE  

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Posted February 17, 2014 - 11:33 AM

 

 

 If I ever get 220 in the shop I'll get another small 220 stick welder for the big stuff and keep my little 110 wire for small stuff

That's the combination that I use with good results. AC-DC stick welder.



#22 js5020 ONLINE  

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Posted March 19, 2014 - 10:53 AM

Finally broke down and purchased a mig today. I don't do much welding so I couldn't justify a big name
brand,so Im going to give the HF 170 amp machine a go and see how it works.

#23 HDWildBill ONLINE  

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Posted March 19, 2014 - 04:06 PM

I'm glad I started to lean how to weld.  The other day I went to adjust the drive chains on a Chinese dune buggy and it called for a spanner to adjust the off center drums.  So I just made one using some round stock and an old piece of metal I had laying around.  Worked great.


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#24 coldone OFFLINE  

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Posted March 19, 2014 - 05:11 PM

I have the HF 170 too. It took a little adjusting to get it to feed right for me and I switched to Lincoln wire. It will weld better than me.


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#25 js5020 ONLINE  

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Posted March 19, 2014 - 08:07 PM

I have the HF 170 too. It took a little adjusting to get it to feed right for me and I switched to Lincoln wire. It will weld better than me.

In my research I saw many say,, get the better wire and youll have pretty good luck with them.



#26 TAHOE ONLINE  

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Posted March 19, 2014 - 09:41 PM

I have the HF151 which was previous model. For the price I paid, I can't complain and I self taught myself on it. Don't looks pretty, but it holds and that's what a flap wheel is for  :D


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#27 ducky OFFLINE  

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Posted March 19, 2014 - 10:40 PM

I have no experience with the 120V welders so I may not have the answer to your question.  But let me tell you what I find with my welder.

 

I use a  Miller XMT304 power source with a dual wire feeder.    I do general repair and fab work for my self on farm type equipment.  COWPOO does cause corrosion and ER70S-6 wire with CO/Argon with some grinding and rust removal does make a very acceptable repair.  It seems to compare to 6011/6013 stick as far as welding on not new metal.  Of course cleaner is always better when it comes to a quality weld.

 

My preference is  .035 non flux core wire with a 75/25 CO/Argon mix.  This seems to have less splatter than a flux core wire in my experience when the welder is set correctly. 

 

I also advise the use of nozzle gels and anti spatter spray.   These products can make you a better welder just by keeping your nozzle clean and keeping the gas flow correct.  A good piece of leather is also good to have around to protect critical areas of the welding area. 

Best thing is ask questions and we will do our best to get you any answer.

 

My first experience with flux core.  See Below.

 

I have been helping my brother and his partner at their new hydraulic repair business and one of their welders is a large Miller power source (300 amp) with a wire feeder.  They have it set up with .045 dual shield (Flux Core) with 75/25 shielding gas. 

I have the worst time welding with this unit.  (No practice does not help)  I have a terrible time trying to see the puddle.  I am using their helmet and that may be an issue.  Before I give up on this welding process I am going to bring my helmet and see what it looks like. 

 

They do most (99%) of the welding on the repaired and new manufactured cylinders with 7018 DC stick.  One of my favorites.



#28 skyrydr2 ONLINE  

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Posted March 20, 2014 - 04:23 AM

If they are welding hydraulic cylinder barrels they should be using 100℅ argon with solid wire!! Or tig. 7018 with out a 100℅ 6013 root pass is just asking for cracks. Oh the horrors of a leaking end cap on a cylinder......

#29 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted March 20, 2014 - 02:54 PM

To update I went out a couple weeks ago and bought a Hobart Handler 125& Auto Dark Helmet and am running it with .030 Hobart wire.

Sorry no pictures yet! But it seems to do better than Dad's Harbor Freight , even considering it has been 30 yrs since I touched a welder. It looks ALMOST like I know what I'm doing. :smilewink:

I think I will try the lincoln wire when I run out. But since I almost always have to work outside I have no imediate plans to go to gas.


Edited by JD DANNELS, March 20, 2014 - 02:57 PM.


#30 js5020 ONLINE  

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Posted March 20, 2014 - 03:37 PM

The HF 170 is a 220v outfit and can run either the flux or gas.  I don't have it yet so no clue how it welds, I have only ever mig welded with a Miller Bobcat so it will be all I could compare it to.  I do have an older Lincoln 225 stick machine that I have yet to use since bringing it here.  As said I weld something once in 3 blue moons around here so it could sit for a year or more at a time, hence not wanting to spend 6 or 8 hundy on a big brand name.  Its a gamble of sorts, long as it glues stuff together, I got a huge grinder for looks if need be.






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