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#1 Walkinman1 OFFLINE  

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Posted February 04, 2014 - 07:05 AM

I'll preface this by saying that sheet metal work has never been my strong suit, I do much better fabricating heavy gauge metal...However, I need to learn so I'm working on it.  I've worked sheet metal before but never enough to get proficient with it so the small trans cover panels on my Ford 120 are providing me good opportunities for practice.  I was doing some research online and stumbled across an article that some of you may find helpful, the guy who wrote it is a true craftsman and I can only hope with enough practice that I may someday be able to pull off something similar...

 

http://fergusoncoach...g.blogspot.com/


Edited by Walkinman1, February 04, 2014 - 08:14 AM.

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#2 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted February 04, 2014 - 07:57 AM

Your link is dead.



#3 Walkinman1 OFFLINE  

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Posted February 04, 2014 - 08:15 AM

I don't know what happened there Kenny, I edited it and tried again; seems to be working now, at least for me.


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#4 Gtractor ONLINE  

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Posted February 04, 2014 - 08:18 AM

link works for me



#5 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted February 04, 2014 - 08:23 AM

It works now, thanks!



#6 IamSherwood OFFLINE  

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Posted February 04, 2014 - 08:29 AM

Thanks for that link.

Good info there.

I will try that stitching/spot welding method.


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#7 Walkinman1 OFFLINE  

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Posted February 04, 2014 - 08:35 AM

The finished product on his panel is amazing, it obviously requires tons of patience but the skill level in the part fitment alone is impressive. Practice, practice, practice, lol!
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#8 TAHOE ONLINE  

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Posted February 04, 2014 - 08:40 AM

Stitch welding is a must to prevent distorting panels, it keeps down on the heat that causes warpage.

 

I will add to your thread. I found this searching for sheet metal work also, these guys are in England working on old cars, but he gives super fantastic tips and shows how to make a sheet metal brake, etc.

 

Dial up beware though, he has tons of pics.

 

http://retrorides.pr...42606=undefined


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#9 hamman ONLINE  

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Posted February 04, 2014 - 09:03 AM

One important thing I learned while working with sheet metal is, Patience......You can't hurry your work if you want a good looking panel or fitting when you are done.        Roger.



#10 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted February 04, 2014 - 09:49 AM

This is a good thread!! Well worth adding to? The site I'm going to link is owned by a guy who sells a line of metal working tools.

But He is one of the top antique auto and aircraft restorers in the country. Along with steel he has a lot of info on working aluminum etc.

The Articles are outstanding. https://www.tinmantech.com/


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#11 Walkinman1 OFFLINE  

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Posted February 04, 2014 - 10:26 AM

By all means guys, add away! I for one am willing to learn anything and everything I can about metal working...it's an art that's always fascinated me but sheet metal has been the toughest part of the learning curve for me.

Patience is certainly key, any good work can't be rushed but sheet metal and body work in general seem to kick the need for patience up another notch. I've always stitch welded thin steel but never saw the "one inch" pattern before; I also never knew that it shrunk the steel and needed to be dollied out before moving on.

I was watching some of "tin man's" videos on YouTube and was pretty fascinated. He does have some nice tools for sale too...If only I had money :D

#12 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted February 04, 2014 - 11:56 AM

Great info here. Thanks to all who have contributed.



#13 petrj6 ONLINE  

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Posted February 18, 2014 - 06:38 PM

     I try and do all of my own work, I do have an added benefit of being a welder fabricator so any metal seems easy for me to work with.  The two tools I have that are invaluable to me in all the projects I do are 1-  simple set of dolly hammers and dies from harbor freight, they were maybe $20 when I bought them but they are awesome in so many ways  2- was allot more expensive, about 2 years ago I got one of those 3 in one machines, it rolls, shears, and bends tin.  it was pricey I paid $400 for a used 36" wide one but it has been really handy, I have even rolled custom exhaust pipe in there!!!!


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