Jump to content

Nominations for Tractor of the Month
Garden Tractors and Parts on eBay



Photo
- - - - -

Tomato trellis ideas


  • Please log in to reply
18 replies to this topic

#1 FirefyterEmt OFFLINE  

FirefyterEmt

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 610
  • 425 Thanks
  • 849 posts
  • Location: Northeast Connecticut

Posted January 04, 2011 - 08:55 AM

Still dreaming in the cold here... This season I need an idea for a rather heavy trellis to hold LOADS of paste tomatoes. I am thinking about a leaning A-frame design that may even allow plants on both sides. Maybe 2x3's with braces and fencing attached to the outside? I would like to let them grow up both sides and "lay" on the fence. The upside would be the ability to keep them solid, and under the trellis would stay moist. In fact, I "might" keep some lettuce under there as it would be out of the sun when it gets really hot.

Anyway, has anyone used a-frame type trellis, or something like I describe. The problem with the paste type is ones like the Roma's all come ripe at the same time and put's a heavy load on your support.

I also will have a lot of tomatoes, so cages are not the way to go. I have about half a dozen concrete wire ones, but they are expensive and not the "end all" set up. I will be planting in the range of 30+ plants in three rows.

Photos, links, and discussion welcomed!

#2 Reverend Blair OFFLINE  

Reverend Blair

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 1659
  • 501 Thanks
  • 952 posts
  • Location: Winnipeg

Posted January 04, 2011 - 10:02 AM

I built a couple of these for a lady a few years ago. She wanted them as much as a landscape feature and to cover up her water standpipes as anything else. No idea how they worked, or where she got the design, but they were strong. She is an avid gardener, I can tell you that. Also an excellent customer...the kind who recommends you to her friends. Her's were two feet wide and five feet tall, but you can adjust the size to fit your purposes. I can't remember the angles, but again you can adjust them to fit.

Build two ladders out of 4x4 posts. Cut the tops at an angle so they meet in the middle. Attach them to a 2x6 as kind of a ridge board. Use 2x4 lumber spaced 24" on centre as the "steps" of each of the ladders. Cut the bottom of the posts at the correct angle so they sit level. Attach 2x6 to the bottom of the posts. Drill holes in the bottom 2x6 to drive rebar through. The rebar will hold the whole thing on the ground.

Cut heavy lattice so that it goes about halfway through each 4x4.

Rabbit out a 2x4 frame to go around the outside of each side of the trellis, forming a frame around the lattice.

I built them out of pressure treated lumber. All fasteners were screws.

#3 Alc ONLINE  

Alc

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 1094
  • 5,458 Thanks
  • 6,625 posts
  • Location: Bangor Pa

Posted January 04, 2011 - 11:30 AM

I also plant about 30 tomato plants and need something better to support tehm too. I like the A frame idea , maybe put the lattice on one side and leave the back open to pick the ones that grow through ?

#4 FirefyterEmt OFFLINE  

FirefyterEmt

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 610
  • 425 Thanks
  • 849 posts
  • Location: Northeast Connecticut

Posted January 04, 2011 - 06:29 PM

Good thought about ones that grow through to the inside. I would like to make them kinda wide too so that you can walk into the space between them.

I kinda like the lattice idea too, but worry how it would hold out over years. The fencing may hold up better... I also do not want them to have a heavy angle so that they "want" to grow up and not fall over side ways. I think the fence may work better to tie them as they grow too.

I did find this today, thought I would share it. Tomato Staking Techniques Evaluation | Master Gardeners of Santa Clara County

#5 MH81 ONLINE  

MH81

    Proud to be Deplorable

  • Staff Admin
  • Staff
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 802
  • 27,302 Thanks
  • 28,628 posts
  • Location: N. W. PA

Posted January 04, 2011 - 06:50 PM

By making two of these, (idea stolen from the concrete reinforcement grid idea on the link above)
trellis panel.jpg

and connecting them at the top, you'd still have a place for shading the lettuce & access to the harvest on both sides of the panel. probably be a steadier rig in the wind too.
trellis.jpg

#6 Alc ONLINE  

Alc

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 1094
  • 5,458 Thanks
  • 6,625 posts
  • Location: Bangor Pa

Posted January 04, 2011 - 08:46 PM

Would you use concrete wire of galv. fencing ? Either one would work , I bet it would be easy to keep the tomatoes off the ground .

#7 MH81 ONLINE  

MH81

    Proud to be Deplorable

  • Staff Admin
  • Staff
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 802
  • 27,302 Thanks
  • 28,628 posts
  • Location: N. W. PA

Posted January 04, 2011 - 08:58 PM

Would you use concrete wire of galv. fencing ? Either one would work , I bet it would be easy to keep the tomatoes off the ground .


I wonder what the zinc & other metals in the fencing would do to the 'maters?

#8 FirefyterEmt OFFLINE  

FirefyterEmt

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 610
  • 425 Thanks
  • 849 posts
  • Location: Northeast Connecticut

Posted January 04, 2011 - 11:08 PM

Well, I may end up with this set up...
Build an A-Frame Tomato Trellis - Vegetable Gardener

Posted Image

Every where I look, it seems to be a very common method and inexpensive. I also like this plan where it can be broken down and stored inside for the winter. Now, I have to decide if I want to make 8 of these, planting 4 per trellis to give me my 32 plants... or maybe scale back this year and place 5 per trellis for 20 plant total. I had 10 Roma's last year and needed more paste tomatoes. I did have about 12 big boy/better boy's but the harvest was not nearly as good on them compared to the Roma's. There is a very good chance that the 20 paste plants will be enough for sauce. Decisions, decisions....
  • Texas Deere and Horse and DanO have said thanks

#9 Bolens 1000 ONLINE  

Bolens 1000

    DR. Bolens

  • Staff Admin
  • Staff
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 7
  • 12,698 Thanks
  • 17,206 posts
  • Location: Western NY

Posted January 05, 2011 - 05:25 AM

I kind of like that A frame idea...

#10 mjodrey OFFLINE  

mjodrey

    Accumulator

  • Senior Member
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 92
  • 2,343 Thanks
  • 13,481 posts
  • Location: Upper Granville, Nova Scotia, Canada

Posted January 05, 2011 - 05:42 AM

Alan,I like your idea,but that A-frame is a good one too.

#11 Alc ONLINE  

Alc

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 1094
  • 5,458 Thanks
  • 6,625 posts
  • Location: Bangor Pa

Posted January 05, 2011 - 08:56 AM

That A frame looks like it would be easy to build and cheaper then fencing , I have some old 2 x6 x12' deck boards I could rip in half . Also like that it can be broken down . Is it bolted together or just a slip fit ?

#12 FirefyterEmt OFFLINE  

FirefyterEmt

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 610
  • 425 Thanks
  • 849 posts
  • Location: Northeast Connecticut

Posted January 05, 2011 - 09:05 AM

There is a link in my e-mail with a pdf copy of the plans. It's a slip fit, but I think the places they used steel pins would be better suited with carriage bolts and wing nuts. That way there is no way it will move. But that is what I really like about it is the ability to break it down into something that can be stored indoors.

#13 oldgearhead OFFLINE  

oldgearhead

    Member

  • Member
  • Member No: 1891
  • 12 Thanks
  • 24 posts
  • Location: N.W. Missouri

Posted January 31, 2011 - 11:45 AM

By making two of these, (idea stolen from the concrete reinforcement grid idea on the link above)
[ATTACH=CONFIG]8954[/ATTACH]

and connecting them at the top, you'd still have a place for shading the lettuce & access to the harvest on both sides of the panel. probably be a steadier rig in the wind too.
[ATTACH=CONFIG]8953[/ATTACH]


This will definitely work, I made mine out of old cattle panels I bought at auctions. I would cut 16 foot panels in half for easier handleing. I drive steel post and wire the panels to them because of winds. This type of system is good for cucumbers. Train the cucumbers to climb the fence and no dirt.

#14 DanO OFFLINE  

DanO

    Greasemonkey

  • Senior Member
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 1918
  • 153 Thanks
  • 350 posts
  • Location: catskill Area of NYS

Posted January 31, 2011 - 12:01 PM

That A Frame is a Great Idea. Thanks for posting that. I Think I will definitely build a few of them.....Could even make them out of PVC Pipe, would last forever.....I wouldn't use old decking wood if it's pressure treated wood,
I'd be concerned about the poison in the PT wood getting into the plants & soil ....Just a thought, I May be wrong.

#15 Alc ONLINE  

Alc

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 1094
  • 5,458 Thanks
  • 6,625 posts
  • Location: Bangor Pa

Posted March 12, 2011 - 07:35 AM

I picked up " Trellis Netting" at the farm & feed store , it's 7" mesh netting 5' x30' made by DALEN for $11.95 . On the package it shows different way to use it. I'm going to try making the A frame trellis for the my tomatoes this year and use the netting for support .
Home - Dalen Products




Top