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Tell me a little about a Case 448.


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#91 NUTNDUN OFFLINE  

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Posted January 10, 2011 - 11:31 AM

I am all ears on your suggestions for removing the steering wheel :D

#92 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted January 10, 2011 - 11:42 AM

Word of caution as to where engine bolts up. The Onan mounting "feet" are prone to breaking off. With yours evidently not being tight, causing that wear, it's a miracle one isn't broken off already. The caustion I speak of is in altering those spots at all. If you build the spots up, they MUST all 4 be on an even plane, or when, or soon after you bolt the engine down solid, one of the ears (feet) might break off. As long as when finished, you can sit the motor on there & get absolutely no rock, then you'll be ok.

#93 mjodrey OFFLINE  

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Posted January 10, 2011 - 11:42 AM

A bearing separator usually works for me in removing steering wheels without causing any damage.

#94 hydriv OFFLINE  

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Posted January 10, 2011 - 01:15 PM

I more then likely will tear it down the rest of the way. Especially now that I have gotten a couple of the hoses back in place and am able to see how the rest of it will go back together. I wish the weather was a little warmer for more comfortable sandblasting or getting the electrolysis tank setup.

There is a good bit of wear in the frame where the motor bolted. I was going to ask if filling with weld and grinding flat was the best way to fix it.

There are four rubber pucks that make up part of the motor mount system. Replace them with new ones. They mount UNDER the FRAME and are there to provide some give when the frame twists and torques. New bolts and Nylock nuts are a good idea. Check them for tightness once each year is a good idea. You should make a check list.

There is some play in the front axle pivot. The axle isn't bent at all.

Don't leap to that conclusion, my friend. Make sure all four tires have equal pressure so that the tractor sits flat on the floor. Then stand directly over each kingpin and look downward. If the axle is twisted, the kingpin will not appear to be dead vertical. This causes hard steering. It is essential to correct because it puts added stress on all of the steering components.

Do they make a bushing kit for the pin or do they make an oversized pin?

No. you buy a new pin and bush the axle. However, if the frame hole is damaged, I suppose that it could be reamed round to the next size up, bore the axle to match and make a new pivot pin. What you do will be governed by what you find.

I am missing the pin retainer which I will get. Looks like I will be taking a ton of pics and starting a build thread. I might as well tear it down the whole way. I just wanted to be comfortable that I knew where everything went. I am sure I could have figured it all out between me and everyone here and the manuals.

If you have downloaded the Part Manual that is CORRECT for the serial number of your tractor, the exploded diagrams will tell you a lot.

The axle as far as leaks looks really clean. I will tear it down and get some better/more pics posted for everyone.


I'm sure that you know that dirt and grease build-up can often point out where problems lie.


#95 NUTNDUN OFFLINE  

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Posted January 10, 2011 - 01:40 PM


I'm sure that you know that dirt and grease build-up can often point out where problems lie.


The only problem with that statement and this tractor is there was grease build up and dirt everywhere.

#96 caseguy OFFLINE  

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Posted January 10, 2011 - 04:29 PM

Congrats George! I'm officially jealous! That looks like a great machine!

#97 Texas Deere and Horse OFFLINE  

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Posted January 10, 2011 - 04:44 PM

George, Wow!!!!

What a deal, and what a machine, would you like you money back? I would even give your gas money back,lol

Great looking deal, Brian

#98 NUTNDUN OFFLINE  

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Posted January 10, 2011 - 07:15 PM

Thanks guys. I know I got a heck of a deal and I am happy with it. I am going to start a new thread to keep track of my progress as well as ask questions along the way for the rebuild. I definitely don't think this is going to be something I get done in a week as there is a lot to work on.

#99 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted January 10, 2011 - 07:32 PM

Thanks guys. I know I got a heck of a deal and I am happy with it. I am going to start a new thread to keep track of my progress as well as ask questions along the way for the rebuild. I definitely don't think this is going to be something I get done in a week as there is a lot to work on.


Yep, take it slow so you don't forget something. Patience is key with most any project. Plus going slower spreads the cost over a period of time too!

#100 coldone OFFLINE  

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Posted January 10, 2011 - 09:02 PM

Its been a few days so i have forgiven your little joke and I can now speak to you. :D
Congrats and i am jealous as MUD about your purchase. I have been wanting a case 400 series for a few years now and I can never catch a good deal on one. But I am still looking.

#101 NUTNDUN OFFLINE  

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Posted January 10, 2011 - 09:28 PM

Its been a few days so i have forgiven your little joke and I can now speak to you. :D
Congrats and i am jealous as MUD about your purchase. I have been wanting a case 400 series for a few years now and I can never catch a good deal on one. But I am still looking.


LOL, sorry buddy. I figured with all of the ribbing I was getting it was only fair that I returned the favor :D

#102 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted January 10, 2011 - 09:31 PM

LOL, sorry buddy. I figured with all of the ribbing I was getting it was only fair that I returned the favor :D


Yes George, but you took out some innocent folk too!:bigrofl: It's all good my friend!

#103 tractormike OFFLINE  

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Posted January 10, 2011 - 09:56 PM

I think you got a heck of a deal there George, good for you! With the price of the options you got with the tractor you couldn't go wrong!

#104 hydriv OFFLINE  

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Posted January 11, 2011 - 02:59 PM

I am all ears on your suggestions for removing the steering wheel :D


George,
I believe that you said you have the correct parts book for this tractor. If you are sure, then find the page that shows the steering wheel. I'm pretty sure that your wheel is held on with a "spring pin" or "roll pin" depending upon which terminology plays in your corner of the world. You should find a hole on each side of the steering wheel HUB that gives you access to the cross pin. These are one of those "Well it seemed like a good idea at the time" type of things. Not only did they drop the previously used wheel that was slotted for the Woodruff (half-moon) key inserted into the steering shaft but the also made the center cap of the wheel molded into the wheel.

I'm sure that those changes saved as much as fifty cents per tractor and perhaps sped up the assembly line by 90 seconds but it makes YOUR life difficult today. You need a decent quality 1/4" drift punch to drive that pin out and I will tell right now that they can be a huge problem to get them to even move.

Now let's just say that you get lucky enough to drive the pin all the way out and then extract your punch. Now you are faced with the dilemma of a rusty steel shaft inside a tight fitting hub of aluminum or pot metal. The fact that you can no longer remove the center cap makes it impossible to get penetrating oils in there. On the older wheels, the guys have soaked that area on and off for a week to try and break the rust. Sometimes with success and sometimes not.

The final problem is that the pot metal hub is placed into the steering wheel mold and the plastic is poured all around it. The plastic is the only thing that locks the two together. There are no steel spokes welded to the hub that are inside the plastic spokes of the finished steering wheel. So if you put too much rotary force (twisting) on the steering wheels outer rim, you can break the plastic bond between the hub and the wheel. At that point, the plastic wheel comes off the hub and I'm not aware of any way to reverse what just happened.

So how do we try to salvage this $120.00 wheel?

One method has been to bore a large hole in the center cap to allow a puller to bear down on the steering shaft while a bearing splitter with shims is placed under the wheel. The shims put the bearing splitter in direct contact with the hub so that the puller is not pressing on the plastic exterior of the hub. Long bolts go from the puller to the bearing splitter and then short bursts from an air impact are used to spin the main screw on the puller.

New center caps for the older wheels are still available. You use a Dremel tool to remove the old fixed cap and then silicone the new one in place once the wheel has been re-installed.

Any questions?

#105 NUTNDUN OFFLINE  

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Posted January 11, 2011 - 03:16 PM

I know my steering wheel doesn't have a cap in place but I can't tell you if it was the one piece variety and they already cut the cap out of it or if it actually had a cap that has been lost. I will check it tonight when I get home.




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