Jump to content

Nominations for Tractor of the Month
Garden Tractors and Parts on eBay



Photo
- - - - -

R/t tractor-1


  • Please log in to reply
1 reply to this topic

#1 jdcrawler OFFLINE  

jdcrawler

    tinkerer

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 1639
  • 3,173 Thanks
  • 1,724 posts
  • Location: Madison, Indiana

Posted January 03, 2011 - 11:09 AM

.

I have a gas tank off a Wisconsin V4 stationary engine that I'm going to use on the tractor.
the mounting brackets are made out of 1 inch square steel tube that has one end bent to curve in to the frame.
Both brackets are formed and mounted to the tank.

Posted Image


I made plates that will bolt to the frame and the curved end of the tank brackets will be welded to them.
The frame plates are finished and bolted in place. You can also see the rear pivot mount for the front axle radius arm in this photo.

Posted Image


The tank is then bolted to the mounting brackets.
I also made two 3/8 diameter support rods for the tank mounting brackets.
They fasten to the upper tank mounting bolt on the mounting bracket and bolt to the frame to help support the mounting brackets.

Posted Image


Posted Image


Next on the agenda is mounting the seat. I have a seat off an old Sears tractor and a seat spring off a John Deere 110.
Here the front section of the seat base has been bent and is tack welded on the frame.
I'm using a angle gauge to make sure it is sitting square to the frame.

Posted Image


The finished seat base with the seat and the spring attached.
The front of the base is welded to the frame but the back of the base is bolted to the frame.
That way the back of the base can be removed in order to remove the rear axle from the frame.

Posted Image



The base is made out of 3 inch wide steel that is welded to the frame at the front and has two bolts holding it to the frame at the back.
It feels very solid but ( like the front axle ) I would rather make it stronger now than have it bend later.
So I decided to make an extra brace for it.
the brace is made out of 1/2 inch steel bar.
It bolts to the outside of the frame and angles back and is bolted to the underside of the seat base.
This will keep the base from ever bending backwards.

Posted Image


This brace also angles to the inside edge of the seat base to keep the base from bending sideways.

Posted Image


I have a set of rear fenders off a Economy Power King tractor. These originally mounted on the frame of the tractor.
My frame sits in farther than the Power King so I need to make adapter plates to mount the fenders on the axle.

Posted Image


The fenders from the side with the tires on.

Posted Image


And from the rear.

Posted Image


Here is the hydraulic pump that I'm going to use. Half of the coupling has already been mounted on it.

Posted Image


I want to mount the pump directly to the front of the engine So I made a coupler that bolts directly to the front of the flywheel.

Posted Image


The pump is strapped in place and I'm making up the parts for the mounting bracket.

Posted Image


Drilling and tapping the holes in the frame for the base plate.

Posted Image


The mounting bracket is all welded up and primed.

Posted Image


The bracket and pump are bolted in place.

Posted Image

Posted Image


I was able to get a steering box off an old Allis Chalmers tractor.
She looks a little rough on the outside but it turns freely and there isn't much slop in the gears.
I tightened the adjusting screw on the side of the box and it works nice and smooth now..

Posted Image


The steering column tube is shortened to what I think will work for my tractor.
I slipped an old Ford automotive steering wheel over the steering shaft so I can get an idea of where the box needs to sit.
I have a tractor steering wheel coming off ebay but it isn't here yet. I won't shorten the steering shaft until I get the tractor wheel.
Here I'm making up the steering box mount on the side of the frame.

Posted Image

#2 jdcrawler OFFLINE  

jdcrawler

    tinkerer

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 1639
  • 3,173 Thanks
  • 1,724 posts
  • Location: Madison, Indiana

Posted January 03, 2011 - 11:09 AM

This is the finished mount, looking from the side and from the top.
The transmission had two bosses on the left side for mounting side shift arms.
I had to cut one boss off to get clearance for the steering box.

Posted Image

Posted Image


The steering arm had to be shortened and I welded an end on it to accept a standard tie-rod end.
The steering rod is for the model A axle.
Here is a view of the finished arm from the side.

Posted Image


The steering rod with the wheels turned all the way to the left.

Posted Image


and the wheels turned all the way to the right.

Posted Image


The steering wheel got here so I started working on it.
The steering shaft is 3/4 inch diameter and the hole in the wheel is 7/8 diameter at the top and 1 inch diameter at the bottom.

I bored the steering wheel out to 1 inch diameter all the way thru.
Using a universal 3/4 bore pulley sleeve, I turned the outside down to 1 inch diameter and left a 1/4 inch thick flange on one end.

I have a couple of exhaust couplers from the mufflers off a Yamaha motorcycle.
I took one and turned the threaded end down to fit over the flange on the sleeve.
Then I turned the notches off the exhaust nut.

The sleeve is set in the steering wheel and I drilled 6 holes thru the flange and about 1/4 inch deep into the wheel.
Then I welded the 6 holes up so this sleeve and the exhaust thread are fastened to the wheel.

Here is a photo of the wheel showing the plug welds on the sleeve flange and the thread section of the exhaust nut.
The exhaust nut without the notches is in the center of the photo.
The other exhaust nut and section of muffler is to the far right so you can see what they look like.

Posted Image


Here is the wheel with the exhaust nut threaded onto it.
This exhaust nut will extend down over the top of the steering column to give it a nice finished appearance.

Posted Image


The original tractor steering column was pitted bad so I made up a new column out of some steel tube.
After shortening the steering shaft to the correct length, I saw that it was a tube with a 1/2 inch inside diameter.
I cut the head off a 1/2 inch bolt and pushed it into the steering shaft leaving about 3/4 inch of thread sticking out.
After I drilled two holes thru the shaft and into the bolt, I then welded the bolt to the shaft.

Using a 1/2 inch washer, I welded it to the top of the steering wheel.
This will keep the wheel from sliding farther down the shaft and a nut on the 1/2 bolt will keep it from coming off.

The last thing to do was set the steering shaft in the mill and machine a keyway in it to match the keyway in the steering wheel sleeve.

Here is the finished steering box, column and wheel.

Posted Image


Some time ago my wife had a stationary exorcise walker.
After she wore it out, I cut it up and keep what parts I thought might be of use some day .
I'm using the foot pads off the walker for the foot rest on the tractor.
The finished foot rest on the left side.

Posted Image


And on the right side.

Posted Image



Mounting the brake peddles was the next thing I wanted to work on because I thought I had them all worked out already.
This is a brake peddle assembly out of a Toro Groundsmaster.

Posted Image


I figured this whole unit would just mount up in front of the foot pad so I made a support post to angle up from the frame for it to mount on.

Posted Image


Then I mounted the brake peddle assembly on it.

Posted Image


Once I stood back and took a look at it, I realized that it didn't look good.
It looks too big and bulky sitting out there like it was. Half of the bracket is actually sitting out past the edge of the foot pad.

Also, to operate the peddles you have to push down on them which is awkward from a sitting position.
So I took the peddle assembly apart to see what parts I could still use from it.

Posted Image


I removed the pivot pin from the bracket that it was mounted on.
Then I made a new mounting bracket and pressed the pivot pin into it and welded it on the back side.
This was then bolted to the side of the frame under the foot pad.

Posted Image


Using part of the peddle arms and the peddle pads, I bent up two sections of 3/4 inch rod to form the new peddle arms.

Posted Image


These are the finished peddles with the cable brackets welded on them.
The bracket to the right, mounts to the frame and to the end of the pivot pin.
This supports the end of the pivot pin and keeps the peddles from sliding off.

Posted Image


I cut the back end that has the cable mounting slots off the Toro bracket and welded it to the underside of the foot pad bracket.
I also made a bracket that has two bolts in it to control how high the peddles come up.

Posted Image


This is how every thing looks after it is all mounted. The brake cables are just set in place so you can see how they line up.

Posted Image


The back side of the peddles.

Posted Image




Top