Jump to content

Garden Tractors and Parts on eBay



Photo
- - - - -

Propane Shortage Hits The Wallet


  • Please log in to reply
89 replies to this topic

#46 js5020 ONLINE  

js5020

    Member

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 7086
  • 645 Thanks
  • 753 posts
  • Location: PA

Posted January 29, 2014 - 03:58 PM

That's my story and I'm stickin to it :smilewink:


  • A.C.T. said thank you

#47 Team_Green OFFLINE  

Team_Green
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 10410
  • 2,214 Thanks
  • 2,305 posts
  • Location: East of Edmonton...

Posted January 29, 2014 - 04:28 PM

old dogs new tricks???? hahahaha 


  • A.C.T. said thank you

#48 js5020 ONLINE  

js5020

    Member

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 7086
  • 645 Thanks
  • 753 posts
  • Location: PA

Posted January 29, 2014 - 04:33 PM

old dogs new tricks???? hahahaha 

Old dog same tricks LoL


  • A.C.T. said thank you

#49 twostep OFFLINE  

twostep

    Rockstar

  • Senior Member
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 10198
  • 1,933 Thanks
  • 2,514 posts
  • Location: Berea, KY

Posted January 29, 2014 - 04:49 PM

Since so many of us are DIY'ers I figure you all will enjoy this site: http://www.builditsolar.com/index.htm


  • Alc, js5020, boyscout862 and 4 others have said thanks

#50 js5020 ONLINE  

js5020

    Member

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 7086
  • 645 Thanks
  • 753 posts
  • Location: PA

Posted January 29, 2014 - 04:59 PM

Since so many of us are DIY'ers I figure you all will enjoy this site: http://www.builditsolar.com/index.htm

Ya thats a good site, been there several times.


  • A.C.T. said thank you

#51 boyscout862 ONLINE  

boyscout862
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 8923
  • 11,250 Thanks
  • 8,351 posts
  • Location: N.E. Connecticut

Posted January 29, 2014 - 05:04 PM

That makes me SICK.  It goes to show you how our fellow man looks out for each other.

 

 

Now this solar stuff I am interested in.  I wouldnt care if I couldnt replace all the fossil fuel used here but 1/2 would be sweet, the problem becomes cost of equipment vs the savings.  One of the bigger stumbling blocks here is the fact I only use about 650 gal per year for heating and hot water. The cooking gas is no biggie it was 90 bux just a bad time to have it filled and I think they show up every 4 or 6 mos.  I had an elec stove but replaced it with gas for power outage reasons and cost difference to run is not worth bothering with. I could switch back to E as everything is still in place to do so, just have to find an E stove that isnt a pos.

 

 

Let some dust out that wallet ya cheap bugger..  :poke:  You do solar first so i can learn from you..  :smilewink:

 

 

Your house is facing the south, which is part of the process, now just spend some money and get to it!!

 

 

Oh man ,,,, spend money, that can be a problem,,, Im good friends with my pennies :love: .  Actually I have been thinking more and more about doing this, I was thinking about trying it on a small scale for the shop since its a smaller area and if it doesnt work out not much lost and/or it would be a building block for a much larger system for the house. 

 

 

Understatement of the year????   :poke:

First let me tell you that I am an Engineer to the bone and there are very few people that are cheaper than I am. I am cheap for the long run. That is why 40 years ago I started planning to build a new solar heated house. Making my house passive solar heated did not cost extra it just required planning and doing things a certain way. As an Army NCO and then an LT, I was taught to Keep It Simple, Stupid(KISS). The proper passive solar system has no moving parts and requires no fans or pumps. It just needs south facing windows and something to store the heat. I chose 9 sliding glass doors and an 11" thick concrete slab for mine.

 

To add on a solar heat collector, it is best to KISS the project. Make collectors that attach to the house and use hot air rising to bring the heat into the house. This is an excellant example  http://www.motherear...at-grabber.aspx . It can be built out of salvaged materials and then it won't cost much. Just be sure that it faces true south and isn't in the shade. This is basic but I've seen panels placed where they never got sun. Those people are now sure that solar doesn't work. My father was using it in 1946 and I've been using it since 1998, even before we moved in.

 

If anyone has questions, I am willing to help with what I know. We are all in this together. Good Luck, Rick


  • sacsr, js5020, A.C.T. and 1 other said thanks

#52 js5020 ONLINE  

js5020

    Member

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 7086
  • 645 Thanks
  • 753 posts
  • Location: PA

Posted January 29, 2014 - 05:22 PM

First let me tell you that I am an Engineer to the bone and there are very few people that are cheaper than I am. I am cheap for the long run. That is why 40 years ago I started planning to build a new solar heated house. Making my house passive solar heated did not cost extra it just required planning and doing things a certain way. As an Army NCO and then an LT, I was taught to Keep It Simple, Stupid(KISS). The proper passive solar system has no moving parts and requires no fans or pumps. It just needs south facing windows and something to store the heat. I chose 9 sliding glass doors and an 11" thick concrete slab for mine.

 

To add on a solar heat collector, it is best to KISS the project. Make collectors that attach to the house and use hot air rising to bring the heat into the house. This is an excellant example  http://www.motherear...at-grabber.aspx . It can be built out of salvaged materials and then it won't cost much. Just be sure that it faces true south and isn't in the shade. This is basic but I've seen panels placed where they never got sun. Those people are now sure that solar doesn't work. My father was using it in 1946 and I've been using it since 1998, even before we moved in.

 

If anyone has questions, I am willing to help with what I know. We are all in this together. Good Luck, Rick

These are exactly what I was thinking about trying on the shop, as said I do not have expectations of totally replacing other fuels, but if that would happen it would be even better.  My biggest concern with solar in this area is when we need it (Nov-Apr) its usually cloudy with no sun for days, when we dont need it (May-Oct) sun is plentiful.


  • Alc, boyscout862, A.C.T. and 1 other said thanks

#53 boyscout862 ONLINE  

boyscout862
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 8923
  • 11,250 Thanks
  • 8,351 posts
  • Location: N.E. Connecticut

Posted January 29, 2014 - 05:30 PM

Use an overhang to shade the collector in the summer when the sun is high. In the winter the sun is low and will come in under the overhang. My roof overhangs so that I get no sun from early May to late August. On 21Dec the sun comes 16' into the house. the main problem is enough sunny days but you even get some heat on mostly cloudy days. Read up on the heat grabber "how it works" and other similar articles. I studied this for 15 years to get through the B.S. to the good info. Good Luck, Rick

 

It was about 9* out when the sun came up and 65* inside. The wood stove in the basement was barely burning. By 1400 it was 22* outside and 75* inside. That was pretty much all solar gain(there was some cooking). Normal temps of 34* high and 20* low with sunny days don't require any wood.


Edited by boyscout862, January 29, 2014 - 05:48 PM.

  • js5020, A.C.T. and oldedeeres have said thanks

#54 js5020 ONLINE  

js5020

    Member

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 7086
  • 645 Thanks
  • 753 posts
  • Location: PA

Posted January 29, 2014 - 06:12 PM

The sun can be a very powerful energy source, we just need to figure viable economical ways to use it.  Unfortunately my buildings werent designed solar, my shop doesnt have a window in it and the short side faces south but I could put a few of those "collectors" on the building.  Never knew anyone who actually used one to know if they were worth the time to build.


  • boyscout862 and A.C.T. have said thanks

#55 boyscout862 ONLINE  

boyscout862
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 8923
  • 11,250 Thanks
  • 8,351 posts
  • Location: N.E. Connecticut

Posted January 29, 2014 - 07:05 PM

The sun can be a very powerful energy source, we just need to figure viable economical ways to use it.  Unfortunately my buildings werent designed solar, my shop doesnt have a window in it and the short side faces south but I could put a few of those "collectors" on the building.  Never knew anyone who actually used one to know if they were worth the time to build.

Try building one from salvaged materials to try for yourself. If you are happy with it, you can add a window. Good Luck, Rick


  • js5020, A.C.T., Arti and 1 other said thanks

#56 boyscout862 ONLINE  

boyscout862
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 8923
  • 11,250 Thanks
  • 8,351 posts
  • Location: N.E. Connecticut

Posted January 30, 2014 - 08:36 AM

For the heck of it, you could build a temporary heat grabber out of a couple of cardboard boxes that refridgerators came in. Laminate the cardboard 2 or 3 layers thick for the back and sides. The center collector could be a single sheet of cardboard painted black and the glazing could be a piece of clear poly. I'd cover all exterior surfaces with poly to protect from moisture. Biggest cost will be the roll of duct tape, glue, and the poly. If you are happy with that then move up to using a sliding glass door panel, but make sure that it is not low E. That would not work. Let us know how it goes. Good Luck, Rick


  • Alc, sacsr, js5020 and 2 others have said thanks

#57 twostep OFFLINE  

twostep

    Rockstar

  • Senior Member
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 10198
  • 1,933 Thanks
  • 2,514 posts
  • Location: Berea, KY

Posted January 30, 2014 - 09:45 AM

The proper passive solar system has no moving parts and requires no fans or pumps. It just needs south facing windows and something to store the heat. I chose 9 sliding glass doors and an 11" thick concrete slab for mine.

 

GREAT advice!!! All of that fancy automated systems won't be worth a hoot when the power goes out. Sure for a short time you can run a gen but what happens when you run out of fuel?

 

http://www.zonbak.co...ivesolar13.html


  • boyscout862, A.C.T. and oldedeeres have said thanks

#58 TAHOE ONLINE  

TAHOE
  • Senior Member
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 24522
  • 7,525 Thanks
  • 5,462 posts
  • Location: "Hamiltucky" Ohio

Posted January 30, 2014 - 10:17 AM

This is some really good info on the solar stuff. My mom's old farmhouse we are moving into has some very old wood windows and the upstairs stays cold. I have to south facing 2nd story windows above garage, this passive solar heating techinique may work to help warm the upstairs a bit. I think there is some old aluminum windows stored in the barn, the glass would be perfect. I have also been thinking about getting "off the grid" with some things, already on septic and a well, just need to figure out independent power.


  • boyscout862, A.C.T. and oldedeeres have said thanks

#59 sacsr ONLINE  

sacsr

    Bush Hog Addict

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 4776
  • 3,402 Thanks
  • 3,340 posts
  • Location: Eastern NC

Posted January 30, 2014 - 10:58 AM

I found a guy that built a collector with used aluminum gutters. I am thinking of trying to put one of those together for my shed......I am struggling with the fact the south of the bulding get limited amount of sun light due to trees and my house.....still studying on how to get around that part. I planned on cutting a hole in the siding on the top and the bottom for the intake and exhaust pipes....will let you know if I do proceed with this. Great information in the post's.....thanks for sharing


Edited by sacsr, January 30, 2014 - 10:59 AM.

  • Alc, A.C.T. and oldedeeres have said thanks

#60 twostep OFFLINE  

twostep

    Rockstar

  • Senior Member
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 10198
  • 1,933 Thanks
  • 2,514 posts
  • Location: Berea, KY

Posted January 30, 2014 - 11:33 AM

That link

 

I found a guy that built a collector with used aluminum gutters. I am thinking of trying to put one of those together for my shed...

Check out the info on this link, this guy built a few different types and tested them all. Based on this testing there is a similar design (bug screen) that performs much better than the downspout collector. http://www.builditso...sting/Index.htm


Edited by twostep, January 30, 2014 - 12:27 PM.

  • A.C.T., oldedeeres and TAHOE have said thanks




Top