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Jacobsen Cultivators


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#1 VintageIronCollector OFFLINE  

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Posted January 21, 2014 - 10:51 AM

I'm going to repaint this and restore it. Any suggestions what I should use throughout my process? I've never actually finished restoring an implement. I want to be sure to actually finish this one.

IMG_3045.JPG

 



#2 chris m ONLINE  

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Posted January 21, 2014 - 12:19 PM

To start things off soak all the hardware (bolts, nuts etc..) in BP Blaster or an equivalent.

 

The key to restoring anything is patience! If you have that you can master anything! :D

 

Next I would take plenty of pictures and or drawings of the piece being restored, this will help a lot in the event you have to shelve the project for a year or more! (Been there done that!).

 

Also if there are any items that need to be installed in a particular place or things that have adjustments (like threaded rods) take measurements before you take the pieces apart. I do this for factory labels also so I get the placement right.

 

Once you have it disassembled you can start stripping the pieces of rust and paint. The way you go about that depends on what you have available. If you don't have access to a sand blaster then you could tackle it with wire wheels, sand paper and what ever else you might have on hand. You could even build one of these   http://gardentractor...lectrolysis-r59

 

Just remember lots of pics and Patience :thumbs: :D Good luck!


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#3 Littledeere OFFLINE  

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Posted January 21, 2014 - 04:54 PM

Hey that's a early Brinly with the Jac hitch


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#4 KC9KAS OFFLINE  

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Posted January 21, 2014 - 05:33 PM

Disassemble it while taking photos.

Clean the parts in an E-tank, then paint & reassemble.

 

(E-tank explained)

Electrolysis

 

 

The following article details the process of using electrolysis for removing rust from tools. Credits are listed at the bottom of the article. I think you'll find it applicable reading for those flea market tools. Now here's the disclaimer: I make no claims as to the effectiveness of this process as instructed by the authors, nor am I responsible for any injury or otherwise negative consequences from employing their technique. Pay attention to any warnings in the article, and if you are not comfortable with the process, or cannot agree with the terms of this disclaimer, then do not read the following text and do not employ the technique. Cleaning Rusty Tools;
Electrolysis Mad
e Easy

 

Editor's Note:
Rust removal and antique tool cleaning is a very controversial subject among old tool collectors and users. Antique tool collectors tend to buy the finer examples of their tool of preference and most will not attempt to clean, fix or restore it in any way. Old tool users on the other hand tend to avoid the high priced "spiffy" tools in favor of tools that show their age. These tools are often found in grampa's basement or at estate sales and they may have either been heavily used or long forgotten and allowed to deteriorate with age. These tools need some form of restoration to return them to working condition.

Electrolysis is the least destructive and most thorough method available to remove oxidation. Electrolysis removes no base metal and does not require grinders, wire wheels, scrappers, acids or sandpaper, and when done properly can remove rust and oxidation yet leave the appearance of "patina" so valued by the collectors. Electrolysis comes as close as possible to a compromise to the ideals of both categories of old tool enthusiasts.


Introduction

This is a fantastic way to remove rust and oxidation from steel and iron tools. It is not recommended for brass, aluminum, copper or exotic metals and alloys.

Electrolysis is a method of removing iron oxide by passing a small electrical charge from a battery or battery charger through the rusty metal to stimulate an exchange of ions while the tool is submerged in an electrolyte solution.

Don't let that description worry you because the actual process is quite easy to accomplish. Let's get to the stuff that makes it work.

This system is so simple, easy to make and to use that anyone that collects or accumulates old tools for use or preservation should keep a small electrolysis system available in their shop.

There are many variations of the setup but this is the simple, down and dirty method that requires a minimum of time, resources and understanding.

After you have a system cookin' you can bone up on the whys and wherefores. You will gain the experience and understanding to begin creating a custom system based on your own needs and understanding.

I'm no guru. I've tried it, I liked it, so I learned it. I find it fascinating that something so simple can accomplish something so significant.

 At the end of this document I've included a couple of url's on the subject.

What I'll try and do here is cut to the meat of the subject and get you started so you can answer most of these questions on your own without having to ask "what if?"

 

List of Supplies

1. A two to five gallon plastic (non metallic) container.
2. A two amp or larger automotive battery charger with an ammeter.
3. A moderately flat piece of iron or steel.
4. A box of Arm and Hammer "Washing Soda" or "Baking Soda".
5. A tablespoon measure.
6. One to five gallons of water.
7. A pair of kitchen type rubber gloves.
8. A kitchen or similar sink full of warm sudsy water.
9. A non metallic 3M type Scotch Bright Finishing Pad product #10144NA.
10. A small tooth brush size stainless steel wire brush.
11. Paste or liquid, non-silicone, car wax.

 

HOW IT WORKS
The Electrochemistry of Rust Removal By Electrolysis

The cleaning process has 4 components- a battery charger, the water with sodium carbonate (washing soda) dissolved in it, an anode (stainless steel object such as a spoon) and the cathode (the rusty iron).

The solution The solution of sodium carbonate has two purposes. First, sodium carbonate is basic. The electrochemical reactions that occur at the rusted iron work best in a basic solution. Lye( sodium hydroxide) would work as well but it is less safe to use. Sodium bicarbonate, baking soda, may not work as well as sodium carbonate because it is less basic. The other purpose for the sodium carbonate is to make the water conduct electricity. When the salt, sodium carbonate, is dissolved in water it becomes sodium ions, Na+, and carbonate ions CO3-2 . These positive and negative charged ions carry the current in solution. Carbonate moves to the positive wire from the battery charger and sodium moves to the negative wire. This movement of ions through the solution results in a current, just like electrons moving in a wire results in a current. Pure water has a high resistance, about 20 million ohms per centimeter, and negligible current would pass without the sodium carbonate ions.

The battery charger is a source of electrical current and voltage. Current is the flow of electrons in a wire. Voltage is a measure of the electron energy. So, the battery charger provides electrons with an energy of 12 volts at its negative lead and accepts electrons at its positive lead. The current indicated by the meter provides a measure of how many electrons are flowing. Current can also flow through water, if the water has ions dissolved in it, as provided by the sodium carbonate.

**Caution** Hydrogen gas reacts explosively with oxygen (in the presence of heat) to produce water vapor.

If you are using electrolysis to remove rust...and have a considerable broth of bubbles...be very cautious. That broth is not the place to discard a glowing cigarette ember, lit match...or any other spark. Be warned...!!


Edited by KC9KAS, January 21, 2014 - 05:38 PM.

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#5 VintageIronCollector OFFLINE  

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Posted January 24, 2014 - 03:30 PM

I want to get around to it soon but it's so cold and the shed doesn't have heat and it's not connected to my house so I'll probably end up having to brave it out in the cold in order to get started. I've already had it since Monday evening and I want to at least get started to feel like I'm making some kind of progress. I plan on getting new stainless steel bolts for it to shiny it up a bit. Does anyone have 2 shovels that they don't need anymore?



#6 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted January 24, 2014 - 05:30 PM

Disassemble it while taking photos.
Clean the parts in an E-tank, then paint & reassemble.
 
(E-tank explained)

The following article details the process of using electrolysis for removing rust from tools.

[/center]


There is a pretty good write-up here in the articles. Has pictures too.
http://gardentractor...lectrolysis-r59

#7 VintageIronCollector OFFLINE  

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Posted January 24, 2014 - 08:53 PM

Should I use stainless or galvanized bolts and hardware? If I still use the cultivators what should black coating should I put on the shovels that will not rub off?



#8 Bmerf OFFLINE  

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Posted January 24, 2014 - 09:56 PM

.. Does anyone have 2 shovels that they don't need anymore?

Check out this place:

http://www.pattonacr.../new-old-stock/

He is a site supporter. Great to work with. :thumbs:


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#9 VintageIronCollector OFFLINE  

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Posted January 25, 2014 - 03:39 PM

today I got the cultivators broken down just paint removal paint hardware and reassemble.



#10 VintageIronCollector OFFLINE  

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Posted January 25, 2014 - 06:20 PM

Which is closer to Jacobsen orange, chrysler hemi or chevy engine orange?



#11 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted January 30, 2014 - 08:08 PM

Which is closer to Jacobsen orange, chrysler hemi or chevy engine orange?


Wow, that's a q for the jake gurus. Were you able to save any paint chips?

#12 Rock farmer OFFLINE  

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Posted February 02, 2014 - 08:32 AM

Which is closer to Jacobsen orange, chrysler hemi or chevy engine orange?


I think I'd check out Kubota orange a a substitute for Jacobsen orange.

I haven't tried it. But, I think it would be readily available.

Joe

#13 VintageIronCollector OFFLINE  

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Posted February 02, 2014 - 10:08 AM

I've seen the difference and it's rather noticable if you're not going to paint the whole tractor orange. I want to paint the cultivators to match the tractor as closely as I can so they look close to the original color.


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#14 VintageIronCollector OFFLINE  

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Posted February 05, 2014 - 12:15 PM

I looked to find Crysler Orange Chevy Orange to compare to Jacobsen Orange. Here's my results the orange color in the white box is Jacobsen Orange.

 

Jacobsen range VS Chrysler Orange.jpg

 

Jacobsen Orange VS Chevy Orange.jpg



#15 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted February 05, 2014 - 12:18 PM

Looks like Chevy is closer to my eyes.




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