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The Horror, The Horror!

torque sequencing

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#1 robert_p43 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 18, 2014 - 12:56 PM

I watched a "small engine mechanic," the other day, working on a briggs and Stratton engine.  Suddenly he picked up a torque wrench and started on an end bolt, working his way, one by one, all on one side till he got to the other end.  He then went back to the first bolt and torqued one by one, down the other side, then he went completely around, one more time, one by one.  NO torque sequence whatsoever. I was speechless.

oh, this was the head bolts


Edited by robert_p43, January 18, 2014 - 02:39 PM.

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#2 Bolens 1000 ONLINE  

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Posted January 18, 2014 - 02:52 PM

Was this a legitimate shop or at a small shop in someones garage?

 

Seems like nowadays everyone is a "Mechanic"  :wallbanging:


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#3 GlenPettit OFFLINE  

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Posted January 18, 2014 - 02:57 PM

That's why the sign in our local Small Engine Repair shop reads:

Repairs                  $ 25 per hour

If you watch              35

If you offer advice     45

If you help                 55


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#4 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted January 18, 2014 - 03:12 PM

I wonder if he prepped the head and block first before slapping a new gasket on it. Who knows! Oh, wait a minute. He was probably re using the old gasket! 


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#5 robert_p43 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 18, 2014 - 03:20 PM

small shop in someones garage.  He was actually doing something else to it.  That was why I was surprised when he suddenly picked up the torque wrench to do that.  Then more surprised when I watched the sequencing of the head bolts.  I didn't bother to try to peek to see what the torque was, figured that at this point, it may not matter. :wallbanging:


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#6 Bill 76 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 18, 2014 - 04:11 PM

Maybe he was druming up some furture work while fixing the first problem.Did he give the bolts the requred extra turn when the wrench clicked ? :rolling:



#7 Jack OFFLINE  

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Posted January 18, 2014 - 04:35 PM

After about 40 years in the automotive repair business I have worked with many "trained" mechanics.  I would say about one out of ten really know what they are doing and perform what I would call 'quality" work.  Choose you repairman wisely.

 

Jack..



#8 toomanytoys84 ONLINE  

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Posted January 18, 2014 - 10:09 PM

I dont think ive ever used a torque wrench on a small engine head. I usually pick a pattern and do it by feel. Never had a problem.

so I guess its good he even used a torque wrench.
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#9 pigsitter OFFLINE  

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Posted January 18, 2014 - 10:58 PM

I can only imagine his reaction if you had suggested doing it properly! :smilewink:



#10 Bruce Dorsi OFFLINE  

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Posted January 19, 2014 - 04:08 PM

I dont think ive ever used a torque wrench on a small engine head. I usually pick a pattern and do it by feel. Never had a problem.

so I guess its good he even used a torque wrench.

 

I agree!

 

Somewhere in the real world there is a compromise between the theoretical and practical.

 

With experience, it is easy to know "How much is enough?" and "How much is too much?"

 

Does everyone use a torque wrench on every bolt on a small engine?  ....If not, why not?  ....Somewhere, there is a torque spec for every size threaded fastener.

 

Please keep in mind that these small engines are not high-rpm, blueprinted race motors that demand critical tolerances.  ...The fasteners on these small engines are not stressed to their limits.

 

Torque wrenches, do indeed, have a useful purpose, and there are some applications were they should definitely be used.

 

The use of a torque wrench is very beneficial to inexperienced people to hopefully prevent them from over or under-tightening a bolt. 

 

However, use of a torque wrench is useless if threads are not clean, and are under/over lubricated.


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#11 toomanytoys84 ONLINE  

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Posted January 19, 2014 - 04:56 PM

The only time I use a torque wrench on a small engine is on the rod bolts..

Now car engines that's a different story




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