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T-92 Transmission Fluid Amount?


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#1 JDGREEN140 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 07, 2014 - 09:45 PM

I have a 1953 Economy Garden Tractor that i just repowered today with a 18hp wisconsin engine. I am looking to change the fluid in both the T-92 transmission and the rear end of the Garden Tractor. What is the proper amount of fluid that should be used in the T-92 and the rear end of the transmission? I am also assuming for both units i should use 80w-90w gear oil? I want to flush the transmission I have heard of people after draining the fluid out of the unit pouring kerosine through the transmission to throughly clean the parts is this a good idea or no?



#2 David Brown OFFLINE  

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Posted January 07, 2014 - 10:10 PM

Half a pint in each tranny.  You should be able to stick your finger in the side hole, bend it down and just touch the top of the oil.  Some folks use STP in the tranny as it is thicker and reduces gear grinding.  You almost have to warm it up before you put it in though.  Otherwise it will take all day.


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#3 sep OFFLINE  

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Posted January 08, 2014 - 10:23 AM

What Jeff said on the 8oz. I use a 50/50 mix of STP and 80/90W gear oil and never had an issue. I also cleaned up the tranny cases with brake cleaner. It cuts through any gunk and dries fast and clean.

 

Steve



#4 Ryan313 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 08, 2014 - 10:57 AM

I used diesel to flush out the drivetrain a couple weeks ago when I did a fluid change in one of my PKs. I was very surprised at how much extra gunk came out with the diesel! I have heard that diesel and kerosene both work fine.

I use 80/90 and it seems to work fine for me. Like said 1/2 pint for the transmissions, I think the differential is 1 pint (I will have to check) and the final drives each take 1 1/2 pints.

#5 JDGREEN140 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 08, 2014 - 06:00 PM

Thanks for all the help I plan on changing the fluid tomorrow.

#6 JDGREEN140 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 08, 2014 - 06:03 PM

Like I said my economy is a 1953 does anyone know what the distance between the drive flywheel to the clutch housing should be I am per mantle mounting my engine tomorrow so any help would be great

#7 glgrumpy OFFLINE  

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Posted January 11, 2014 - 02:29 PM

Should be a snap ring inside bore of flywheel that is the STOP for pushing it on shaft. Is on most models, not sure when that started?  Sometimes this snap ring gets bent in and flywheel moves and causes clutch release issues and grinding gears is worse. The top of the three clutch arms is just about even with bellhousing  clutch mount surface (where the eight bolts are and lever). Might stick out a hair if you put a straight edge accross, don't know if any spec for that. As said, look for snap ring. If no ring in it, feel back in there to see if groove is there. Seems also some early ones had two grooves and you needed to use the right one, depending on what engine was used. Complicated enuf?  There is a pilot bushing and an oil seal used on end of flywheel opening also, just ahead of the snap ring. Drive bushing in only enough to allow room for the seal, not all the way to snap ring. Will be close tho.  Seal seems odd there, but guess keeps gunk from getting on parts if trans leaks some, which the used to with open bearings. There are also two set screws in flywheel back in pulleys. One is on the key, one to crank. The Crank one can have divit drilled down into crank a bit for set-screw to push into and help hold flywheel from moving also. Be careful to use drill that won't take out threads in flywheel. Do this ONLY after pushing flywheel all the way on and bottom out on that snap ring.






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