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Sawin' and Nailin'


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#1 Reverend Blair OFFLINE  

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Posted December 28, 2010 - 01:52 PM

So now that the monkeys are gone, I'm framing and insulating my basement. The monkeys replaced the back wall and about 8 feet of each side wall. The rest of the basement is kind of wacky though.

The house was originally built on concrete piles with no basement. Then somebody (we think around 1972 because a lot of concrete in the yard has that date on it) dug out the basement and poured concrete pony walls up to ground level. They put cindercrete blocks on top of that to reach the rim joists. We have interior weeping tiles that may or may not have been installed at the same time.

Part of the reason my back wall failed (the north side) was that it had been insulated from floor to ceiling, which caused the freeze-thaw cycle to displace the pony walls. That was very much exacerbated by drainage problems in the yard. On top of that, the interior weeping tiles were insulated in some places, causing them to freeze.

Anyway, to keep the same thing from happening to the rest of the basement, I'm insulating the above-ground portion in the traditional manner...thermal break, framing, insulation, vapour barrier...and the bottom 4 feet or so will get extruded polystyrene glued in place, but leaving the seams between the pony wall and the piles exposed. This is the advice from a structural engineer.

Not only is this kind of a wacky way to do things, but there is nothing straight, level, or plumb in the entire basement. I've completely given up on trying to get the framing straight, I just put it in where it fits. Each stud has to be measured and cut separately. Over eight feet the length varies as much as three inches. That's for studs that are between 26" and 32" long. Some sections of pony wall are three or four inches higher than others. There's just no way to make this look pretty.

It's going pretty quick though. Once you beat all of your training into submission and accept that, "It works and is strong," is the only criteria, things kind of fly by.

Drywall will cover my sins.

#2 mjodrey OFFLINE  

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Posted December 28, 2010 - 02:06 PM

Forgive my dumbness,but "the monkeys" ?
And did they sing while they were there ?:laughingteeth:

Edited by mjodrey, December 28, 2010 - 02:11 PM.


#3 Reverend Blair OFFLINE  

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Posted December 28, 2010 - 04:25 PM

No dumbness on your part, just a lack of explanation on mine. The monkeys are the foundation monkeys I hired earlier this year. There's a thread on it somewhere around here.

I'm done the framing. Well, there'll be a couple of L studs required as I insulate, but mostly I'm done the framing. There are two eight-foot sections that look the way framing should. Most of the rest would be passable if done by a beginner who lacked a level and square. One section looks like it was framed by Dr. Frankenstein on a meth binge, but considering what I was up against that's the section I'm proudest of. Not only was every stud a different length, but every piece of wood had to be ripped lengthwise on some sort of angle too. It's also the section where the gas comes in, so there was that to contend with.

I called my drywalling buddy and asked him how to cover this up, since the sections are all at different heights. He said to mark the lowest section and make a level line around the basement at that height, then just let the drywall hang to that line. He offered to come help too, so I'd better stock up on OV. Unless he's suddenly reformed, keeping him in beer for an afternoon is likely to be the most expensive part of the whole project.

Right now I'm just waiting for Mrs. Rev to get home so I can go buy insulation. About an hour ago she said she was going to look at furniture. I never thought much of it, but when I came upstairs I discovered she'd taken the truck. I'm not sure if that means I was parked behind her car or whether it means I have to haul furniture yet today. I also hope she's not buying new furniture. Used is fine, but between me and the dogs, getting new furniture around here is roughly akin to lighting money on fire.

#4 Reverend Blair OFFLINE  

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Posted December 28, 2010 - 04:28 PM

That last question just answered itself. I have to go carry a couch now. It's lightly used demo furniture...kind of halfway between new and used I guess.

#5 Bolens 1000 ONLINE  

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Posted December 28, 2010 - 04:50 PM

Sounds like you got quite the project on your hands.
Hope all goes well for you

#6 caseguy OFFLINE  

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Posted December 28, 2010 - 04:58 PM

Congrats on getting the framing all done...and condolences on the furniture LOL! All I can say is that you're a hoot! Always happy to read your posts!

#7 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted December 28, 2010 - 05:36 PM

That last question just answered itself. I have to go carry a couch now. It's lightly used demo furniture...kind of halfway between new and used I guess.


Maybe she bought it for the newly remodeled basement. :laughingteeth:

Good for you, glad you're making headway.

#8 Reverend Blair OFFLINE  

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Posted December 28, 2010 - 08:30 PM

Well, the couch is in the house. It's comfy and has no cigarette burns...at least so far. Give me a few hours. Also, the dogs like it. There's exactly enough room for the three of us and the little black cat who hangs out with us. The old couch is in the garage because apparently if I leave it in the yard the neighbours will think we're white trash. Twenty years living beside me. What else are they going to think?

The easy part of the insulating is done too. There's still all of those little holes to fill, but the big ones are full.

Supper is done though. More later, I guess.




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