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Painting Engine Block And Cylinder


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#1 JDGREEN140 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 07, 2014 - 08:56 AM

I am looking to paint my paint a couple of small engines that I have aquirred through the years just for quick resto jobs during the winter months. What is the best way to prep these surfaces for paint. I have all the blocks and cyldinders of the entire pressure washed. Should I Scotch pad them or wirewheel them or even break out some sand paper? And is there any type of surface prepper that I could use prior to prime and paint? Any help would be great thanks!



#2 johndeereelfman OFFLINE  

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Posted January 07, 2014 - 09:22 AM

When I do my engines, I usually remove as much of the old paint as possible with Oven Cleaner first. This stuff will not only remove the paint, but will aid in removing any old grease or oil build up. After the final rinse of the oven cleaner, I'll wash the engine again with dish washing liquid to remove any oily residue so that the paint will stick without flaking. 

 

Once the block is stripped, and ready for paint, I apply a good coat of primer. I buy Rustoleum automotive type primer that is sandable. Two coats first, then lightly sand, and one more coat before applying the first coat of finish color. You won't be able to sand every spot smooth, but I usually only concentrate on the areas that won't be covered up by tin or sheet metal. Focus more on the ares that are seen. 

 

As for heat treated paint, I've never had any problems with the automotive primer. It adheres good (as long as the surface is cleaned correctly) and I've never had any flaking or rippling effect due to heat. 

 

Good Luck!


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#3 HANKG ONLINE  

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Posted January 07, 2014 - 09:53 AM

I  agree with above advise, have painted with high temp paint before found it to be unnecessary and rarely matches the tractor color paint.


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#4 jd.rasentrac OFFLINE  

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Posted January 07, 2014 - 10:06 AM

 but first of all:   :welcometogttalk:



#5 boyscout862 ONLINE  

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Posted January 07, 2014 - 10:24 AM

Welcome to GTT. Relax and enjoy the site. Good Luck, Rick



#6 OkieGt OFFLINE  

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Posted January 07, 2014 - 10:38 AM

I dont think your supposed to paint the head itself, but as mentioned oven cleaner works great, I use black hi heat engine enamel on mine



#7 trowel OFFLINE  

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Posted January 07, 2014 - 11:22 AM

Welcome to GT Talk,

:ditto:  on all the above but i use bead blaster to clean engines and tinwork, the fine sand paper surface (depending on bead size used) left behind by the bead blasting helps the primer adhere.

I find high gloss colors tends to shine every imperfections, dents and pits left behind by rust. Satin/low sheen and flat colors seems to compliment each other well. Keep in mind these are old engine and were never painted for perfection in the first place.

Good luck and looking forwards to the pic's.



#8 Dieselcubmike OFFLINE  

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Posted January 07, 2014 - 12:44 PM

Hello and welcome :wave:



#9 superaben OFFLINE  

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Posted January 07, 2014 - 06:16 PM

Welcome to the forum!

 

If you hang around Troy long enough, he will teach you a thing or two about restoring.  :thumbs:

 

Ben W.


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#10 OkieGt OFFLINE  

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Posted January 07, 2014 - 06:57 PM

Welcome to the forum!

 

If you hang around Troy long enough, he will teach you a thing or two about restoring.  :thumbs:

 

Ben W.

Painting is one aspect of restoring that is very, very tough to get right, if you haven't done alot of it. It is however very rewarding and beneficial to learn to put away the rattle can when it comes to many jobs



#11 glgrumpy OFFLINE  

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Posted January 07, 2014 - 08:41 PM

I usually have torn down at least to bare block. Wire brush with angle grinde and small tools best I can on block. Rest of tin I have blaster to clean all the way down to bare. Usually just prime and paint with good rattle can paint. No need for high heat either, reg stuff works fine.



#12 JDGREEN140 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 07, 2014 - 09:58 PM

Thankyou to all for all the advise. I just sandblasted all the tin work on my
Wisconsin TFD and have it primed and painted. But I was unsure on how to approach the block and cylinder head. Now i hear many of you speaking of bead blasting the block. I do have a handheld sandblaster which uses glass bead material would this be similar to the process that you are speaking of. Also 90% of the time I always use a spray gun when painting no matter if the job is big or small, just never had any luck with the rattle can. Thankyou for all the help.


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#13 OkieGt OFFLINE  

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Posted January 07, 2014 - 10:42 PM

Thankyou to all for all the advise. I just sandblasted all the tin work on my
Wisconsin TFD and have it primed and painted. But I was unsure on how to approach the block and cylinder head. Now i hear many of you speaking of bead blasting the block. I do have a handheld sandblaster which uses glass bead material would this be similar to the process that you are speaking of. Also 90% of the time I always use a spray gun when painting no matter if the job is big or small, just never had any luck with the rattle can. Thankyou for all the help.

Your way ahead of the curve with the gun, I'f I were you and I was going to blast it, I might look to another medium other than sand



#14 DougT ONLINE  

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Posted January 08, 2014 - 09:50 AM

I wouldn't blast anything if the engine is assembled. You'll get blast media in places you never dreamed of no matter how much you mask it off.


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#15 OkieGt OFFLINE  

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Posted January 08, 2014 - 10:11 AM

I wouldn't blast anything if the engine is assembled. You'll get blast media in places you never dreamed of no matter how much you mask it off.

That is an understatement, I'm not sure blasting is necessary in many cases, overkill


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