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#1 OkieGt OFFLINE  

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Posted January 06, 2014 - 03:27 PM

I really think I have crimped (or tried to crimp) my last connection. What kind of connectors, and what do you guys think are best way to make a quality connection, solder, heat shrink, etc. ? Thanks


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#2 Chopperhed OFFLINE  

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Posted January 06, 2014 - 03:34 PM

Personally, I prefer to solder and heat shrink connections except where I specifically need a way to disconnect.

 

Basically I use spade connectors or rings where applicable ( ignition, switches, etc) and where I need a disconnect for parts removal.

When I do use a crimp on connector, I prefer to solder in in place and heatshrink over the solder.

If I really have to crimp a connection, i inherited a pair of Controlled cycle crimp tools a few years back. They make for a perfect controlled crimp every time..

 

Splices and taps are soldered and heat shrunk for everything else

 

Then I usually protect wiring with some split loom.


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#3 DougT ONLINE  

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Posted January 06, 2014 - 03:34 PM

My preferred method is solder and heat shrink.  There are butt connectors called posi-lock(?) that have a piece of metal in the center and screw on ends from each side. You bare the end of the wire and stick it through the cap and the cap sandwiches it against the metal. I then seal the caps with silicone to seal the connection. They work good for wires that just won't take solder. I tell the guys here that fixing things with butt connectors can make a real a$$ out of them when it fails.


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#4 hamman ONLINE  

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Posted January 06, 2014 - 03:39 PM

I agree ! Soldering and heat shrinking ! If I have to use butt connectors or spade connectors I use dialectric grease on them and then tape them tightly. Sometimes we need to be able to ocassionaly disconnect a wire. Doing it this way will let us. The dialectric grease inhibits corrosion. JM2CW. Thanks. Roger.


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#5 OkieGt OFFLINE  

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Posted January 06, 2014 - 03:47 PM

Thanks for the great suggestions, now (hope I don't start anything) what's a good soldering gun, I was going to buy an old Craftsman gun, I like them


Edited by OkieGt, January 06, 2014 - 04:01 PM.

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#6 OkieGt OFFLINE  

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Posted January 06, 2014 - 04:02 PM

I'm thinking this would solder and shrink

http://www.ebay.com/...=item460cb69cfd


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#7 hamman ONLINE  

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Posted January 06, 2014 - 05:16 PM

Nice outfit. When you get done with it ship it up here and I'll send it back when I'm done....................................     Roger.



#8 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted January 06, 2014 - 05:19 PM

     The key to getting good crimps is to use a good quality crimping tool. The general purpose ones you get at most hardware stores aren't up to the job IME.  I've seen properly crimped connections last for 30yrs in lab equipment that is exposed to corrosive fumes and there were no issues. Get a quality crimping tool and use good quality, proper sized terminals and you won't have any issues. Using terminals that are too large for the wire size is another typical problem area that I've seen. 

  Soldering to a terminal and heat shrinking certainly does a good job but is not easy and certainly not quick. To make it easier I would suggest crimping the connection first and then filling the end of the terminal with solder. It should pull into the joint when it's hot enough. 

 

Heres one of the ones I use. This one is made by Panduit who also made very good terminals. It does 22-10 gauge crimps on insulated and uninsulated terminals. 

 

DSCF9542.jpg

 

   


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#9 BairleaFarm OFFLINE  

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Posted January 06, 2014 - 05:53 PM

There is nothing wrong with connectors. They won't fail if over heated like soldered joints. Good connectors and a good crimping tool is key. I've used thousands and thousands of those crimp connectors and never had one fail. The ones I use come from wurth and have the heat shrink on them.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I437P using Tapatalk


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#10 DH1 ONLINE  

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Posted January 06, 2014 - 06:05 PM

     The key to getting good crimps is to use a good quality crimping tool. The general purpose ones you get at most hardware stores aren't up to the job IME.  I've seen properly crimped connections last for 30yrs in lab equipment that is exposed to corrosive fumes and there were no issues. Get a quality crimping tool and use good quality, proper sized terminals and you won't have any issues. Using terminals that are too large for the wire size is another typical problem area that I've seen. 

  Soldering to a terminal and heat shrinking certainly does a good job but is not easy and certainly not quick. To make it easier I would suggest crimping the connection first and then filling the end of the terminal with solder. It should pull into the joint when it's hot enough. 

 

Heres one of the ones I use. This one is made by Panduit who also made very good terminals. It does 22-10 gauge crimps on insulated and uninsulated terminals. 

 

attachicon.gifDSCF9542.jpg

 

Couldn't agree more on having a good quality Crimping tool, without it your asking for problems.


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#11 OkieGt OFFLINE  

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Posted January 06, 2014 - 06:18 PM

I was wondering whether it was my crimper and/or my connections, you guys answered that for me, THANKS A BUNCH!!!!, It is so frustrating seeing connections come apart



#12 Chopperhed OFFLINE  

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Posted January 06, 2014 - 06:57 PM

     The key to getting good crimps is to use a good quality crimping tool. The general purpose ones you get at most hardware stores aren't up to the job IME.  I've seen properly crimped connections last for 30yrs in lab equipment that is exposed to corrosive fumes and there were no issues. Get a quality crimping tool and use good quality, proper sized terminals and you won't have any issues. Using terminals that are too large for the wire size is another typical problem area that I've seen. 

  Soldering to a terminal and heat shrinking certainly does a good job but is not easy and certainly not quick. To make it easier I would suggest crimping the connection first and then filling the end of the terminal with solder. It should pull into the joint when it's hot enough. 

 

Heres one of the ones I use. This one is made by Panduit who also made very good terminals. It does 22-10 gauge crimps on insulated and uninsulated terminals. 

 

attachicon.gifDSCF9542.jpg

I have a couple of those crimp tools as well, both made by Panduit, Both brand new and over 40 years old.

The tools I normally use for crimps is these. I have 2

http://store.crimpto...ition-used.html


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#13 Canawler OFFLINE  

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Posted January 06, 2014 - 07:29 PM

     The key to getting good crimps is to use a good quality crimping tool. The general purpose ones you get at most hardware stores aren't up to the job IME.  I've seen properly crimped connections last for 30yrs in lab equipment that is exposed to corrosive fumes and there were no issues. Get a quality crimping tool and use good quality, proper sized terminals and you won't have any issues. Using terminals that are too large for the wire size is another typical problem area that I've seen. 

  Soldering to a terminal and heat shrinking certainly does a good job but is not easy and certainly not quick. To make it easier I would suggest crimping the connection first and then filling the end of the terminal with solder. It should pull into the joint when it's hot enough. 

 

Heres one of the ones I use. This one is made by Panduit who also made very good terminals. It does 22-10 gauge crimps on insulated and uninsulated terminals. 

 

attachicon.gifDSCF9542.jpg

Ditto to this.

 

If you don't know what you're doing with a soldering iron, you're just as likely to have a bad solder joint as you are to have a bad crimp connection.....


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#14 superaben OFFLINE  

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Posted January 06, 2014 - 09:46 PM

JDBrian is the man.  I'm with him 100%, even the best skilled man can't make it without the tools for the job.

 

Pass that on to your wife, and I'll duck low below the shooting range.

 

Ben W.



#15 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted January 07, 2014 - 09:31 AM

I was wondering whether it was my crimper and/or my connections, you guys answered that for me, THANKS A BUNCH!!!!, It is so frustrating seeing connections come apart

Mike, those connections should never fall apart. I know exactly what you mean though. The average combination/crimper tool can't generate enough force to properly crimp. Getting better terminals won't help unless you also have a good quality tool. If you invest in a good quality tool it will reduce the time needed to do electrical work considerably and you'll have confidence in those connections. They aren't cheap and I've had mine for a long time but I'm guessing 30$ would be ballpark.


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