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Middle Buster Plow With Sleeve Hitch?


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#1 ibskot OFFLINE  

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Posted January 05, 2014 - 02:18 PM

Is it a poor design? One on CL. I'd like to have it but wonder if my 16hp WH will pull it. No down pressure.

Thoughts?

#2 TAHOE OFFLINE  

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Posted January 05, 2014 - 02:43 PM

Poor design???

My Sears 16 Hp single pulls a 8" moldboard with manual lift 3 pt with no problem.

Sleeve hitch is a poor design, just a different/ quicker hook up.



#3 New.Canadian.DB.Owner OFFLINE  

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Posted January 05, 2014 - 02:53 PM

Poorly designed for what purpose?  They make a pretty poor screwdriver, but they are handy for opening a potato furrow.  The lack of down pressure can be cured by adding weight to the plow.  As for whether a 16 hp tractor will pull it, that depends on traction & ground type.  If you've prepared your soil properly for planting, then a 1.5 hp walk behind will pull a mud buster plow.  If you are plowing in the forest, you might want something bigger & with more traction, like a steam engine.


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#4 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted January 06, 2014 - 11:33 AM

I do not have one on a GT Sleeve hitch. I have one on a category 1 3 point. If the angle of attack is right you will not need down pressure.

It will suck down just like a mouldboard plow. If one were to set one up for a sleeve hitch I think it would be wise to allow for an angle adjustment to set the attack angle.  I have no doubt you could pull one with the Wheelhorse, you just need a smaller Middle Buster shovel.

Size it for the machine your using.

 

When I bought my middlebuster I heard some say they were worthless and just skipped over the ground. Others Swore they were great.

When I set mine up I adjusted the top link till the upright was verticle and my Ford 1500 (20 hp 2000 lbs+) will bury it clear to the crossbars.

And I have a lot of clay loam soil(read that as tough going).  I see no reason to buy a turning plow this works fine for me.


Edited by JD DANNELS, January 06, 2014 - 11:35 AM.


#5 ibskot OFFLINE  

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Posted January 06, 2014 - 08:52 PM

I really want one to bury corrugated black pipe for a gutter. I read that they make the cleanest even small ditches. Plus I can dig taters too!

#6 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted January 06, 2014 - 10:05 PM

How deep do you need to go to assure that they do not freeze? MY gutter drains are buried but they need to be 3 ft deep up here to assure they do not freeze. I have enough fall to do that on my hill. I sure could not do that with the middle buster.

#7 ibskot OFFLINE  

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Posted January 07, 2014 - 12:40 AM

How deep do you need to go to assure that they do not freeze? MY gutter drains are buried but they need to be 3 ft deep up here to assure they do not freeze. I have enough fall to do that on my hill. I sure could not do that with the middle buster.


The current nationwide deep freeze aside... we usually don't have to worry too much about really cold temps. Currently the pipe is on top of the ground. It is more for looks then real water control. This won't be a french drain or anything. There is a natural slope and I'll want to bury maybe 15-20 ft, that's about it.

#8 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted January 07, 2014 - 08:52 AM

The current nationwide deep freeze aside... we usually don't have to worry too much about really cold temps. Currently the pipe is on top of the ground. It is more for looks then real water control. This won't be a french drain or anything. There is a natural slope and I'll want to bury maybe 15-20 ft, that's about it.

Yeah being in NC I assumed you normally do not have to go nearly as deep.  My drains run about 100 ft and drop about 20 ft into a earth bowl below my house.  while I have not gotten the materials together to do so, I would like to set up holding tanks(Rain Barrels) and run the water into them to use for watering my garden. And running no more than overflow down the tubes.  There is a vauable resource going down the drain(so to speak) and it causes a wet spot on the lower end. 1 inch of rain collected off the house amounts to a couple thousand gallons of water(exact amount escapes me). .

 

You could probably get by down there by burying the tile enough below the surface to assure you did not cut it.  Up here if they froze the water would overflow and run over the sides of the gutter and possibly wash out your foundation.


Edited by JD DANNELS, January 07, 2014 - 08:55 AM.





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