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Any Downside To Filling Rear Tires With Fluid?


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#16 Username OFFLINE  

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Posted January 05, 2014 - 08:59 AM

Your ride will be a little stiffer.


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#17 OldBuzzard ONLINE  

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Posted January 05, 2014 - 09:11 AM

Your ride will be a little stiffer.


That depends on how far you fill the tire.

 

If you fill it all the way and leave no airspace it is going to be stiff as fluid doesn't compress and the tires won't flex..

 

Filling to @ 75% leaves room for air, and allows the tire to flex and give a 'softer' ride.

 

My HDT1000 has all four tires filled with Rim Guard, and it doesn't ride any 'harder' than any of my tractors that have no fluid at all.

 

In general, if you fill with the valve stem at 12:00 and stop when it reaches that level, you will have plenty of airspace and a decent ride.


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#18 Walkinman1 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 05, 2014 - 09:27 AM

I've thought long and hard about the various effects of adding weight to a GT.  Obviously stationary weights, i.e. weight boxes, suitcase weights, etc. add ground pressure at the tire contact patch (which is what you want) but your frame and axle are also carrying all of that extra weight.  Not necessarily a good thing but with the stout construction of most of the GT's we own I doubt it will actually hurt anything so long as you don't abuse it.  Advantages to that style of weight is that you generally hang it behind the axle thus the increase in leverage actually applies more weight to the ground.  

 

From a general physics standpoint rotating weight is generally the hardest thing for the engine to start turning and keep turning although at the low speeds of a GT I doubt that has a significant effect. 

 

With that being said I think fluid filling the tires probably has the most overall benefits:

 

1: It adds fluid weight...  Imagine you have a couple of 5 gallon buckets, one filled with water and the other filled with concrete; now pick them each up by the handle and attempt to spin (rotate) them first clockwise, then abruptly stop and reverse the rotation.  The concrete filled bucket will nearly twist your wrist off while the liquid filled bucket will abruptly go back and forth with the water remaining basically static; the bucket rotates independently of the water.  Obviously if you spin the bucket long enough the water will begin spinning as well but if you suddenly stop the bucket the water will slow to a stop gradually thus reducing the force needed to stop the rotating mass.  A luxury you don't have with bolt on wheel weights.  

 

2:  The weight always settles to the lowest point in the tire thus keeping your center of gravity as low as possible.

 

3:  The weight is unobtrusive, allowing you to add more weight elsewhere if needed.

 

The drawbacks that have been listed are minimal in comparison to the benefits.  Yes, I have loaded tires on several of my machines and yes, I have had to remove wheels and tires for various things, patch tires, replace valve stems, etc.  The added weight and liquid does make it slightly more challenging to do those things but IMO it's easier to deal with than you'd think.  I've also never noticed a ride quality difference as some say they've dealt with.

 

The reality is that adding any appreciable amount of weight to a GT is going to result in inconvenience when the machine needs to be serviced/repaired.  No matter where the weight is placed it will need to be removed and reinstalled at times.  The fact that weights need to be heavy to do their job means that there will always be some difficulty in dealing with them.

 

Just my .02  :D


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#19 Bolens 1000 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 05, 2014 - 09:45 AM

OB, you should become an endorsed spokesman for RimGuard after that sales pitch. You got me sold.  :rolling:  And maybe you can get your next need of RimGuard at cost or FREE. :dancingbanana:

 

I think he secretly Works for Rim Guard.......


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#20 blackjackjakexxix ONLINE  

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Posted January 05, 2014 - 10:11 AM

A lot of good info here,got me thinking about changing fluids


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#21 metrodoggreg OFFLINE  

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Posted January 05, 2014 - 11:07 AM

Great thread lots of useful info!
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#22 Nato77 ONLINE  

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Posted January 05, 2014 - 05:01 PM

It isn't all that bad depending on the RimGuard dealer you deal with. Smaller dealers might not even charge labor to fill the gt tires, such as the one I went to. All said and done it was around 4 dollars a gallon for the RimGuard. One gallon of cheap antifreeze is around 7 dollars a gallon, but you only need half as much since it is mixed 50-50. And windsheild washer fluid is about 3 dollars a gallon but you can not mix it 50-50 like antifreeze. But then that isn't even looking at the weight per gallon, which here is a quick comparison there.

To make calculations easy I will use 10 gallons.
RimGuard is 11 pounds per gallon giving around 110 pounds at $40
Windsheild washer fluid is 8 pounds per gallon giving around 80 pounds at $30
Antifreeze mixed at 50-50 is 8 pounds per gallon giving around 80 pounds at $35

Now for the fun part, the price per pound.
RimGuard is 36.4 cents per pound
Windsheild washer fluid is 37.5 cents per pound
Antifreeze is 43.75 cents per pound

All numbers calculated are approximate, and pricing will vary a little, but you get the idea. By the way, on a gt, don't you want the most weight per gallon in these small tires?

If you watch when washer fluid is on sale it'll be cheaper per lb. than rimguard. Last summer I picked up a 55 gallon barrel for $60 and its good til -20*. If I did my math right it comes to 13.6 cents a lb. To me cheaper is always a little better. Just my 2 cents.


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#23 wvbuzzmaster OFFLINE  

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Posted January 05, 2014 - 05:40 PM

In my defense I have seen windsheid washer fluid as low as $1.89 a gallon, but the other part of that was it was only good to zero degrees, which in most northern states, would freeze. If you look at the the degree rating and want it down to -30 F or -50 F you will be closer to that $3 a gallon number.

Edited by wvbuzzmaster, January 05, 2014 - 05:41 PM.

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#24 shorty ONLINE  

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Posted January 05, 2014 - 08:00 PM

A lot of good pros and cons listed here so far. I have been thinking about filling the rears on mine and just haven't fully decided which to use yet.


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#25 bolex OFFLINE  

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Posted January 06, 2014 - 07:50 PM

i've got a 55 gallon drum of heavy mix calcium i had thought about using in tubes on the H16 and my 8.00/16 speedex tires but i don't remember the lb/gal ratio right now and my fat butt seems to work alright :thumbs:


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#26 Cat385B ONLINE  

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Posted January 06, 2014 - 10:27 PM

i've got a 55 gallon drum of heavy mix calcium i had thought about using in tubes on the H16 and my 8.00/16 speedex tires but i don't remember the lb/gal ratio right now and my fat butt seems to work alright :thumbs:

 

You're supposed to end up at around 11.5 to 11.75 pounds per gallon when mixed. So, about 3 1/2 pounds per gallon.


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#27 TGaffney OFFLINE  

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Posted January 06, 2014 - 11:27 PM

Thank you everyone for sharing your knowledge and opinions.  From the comments I have reviewed I will go forward with filling the tires - looks like the main issue other than choice of liquid and cost -  is to take it easy and not do a lot of quick starting and hard stopping.

 

We lost most, if not all of our snow in the warm up the past day or so.  Looks like I will have to do my test run after the next decent snow storm.


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#28 TGaffney OFFLINE  

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Posted January 24, 2014 - 10:40 PM

Update on my filling tires.  We had a snowstorm midweek so I got to test out the loaded tires while plowing.  Worked great and really helped with the traction and pushing.  I didn't even experience any spinning while moving up and down some slick hills.  I have lugged tires and chains which also help.

 

To fill the tires I used drained antifreeze that I got free from a local garage.  The downside of this is the leak factor - the upside is it won't freeze where I am and it was free.  I have tubes so I think the leak factor is minimal.  


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#29 marlboro180 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 24, 2014 - 10:47 PM

Sweet, glad it is working for you.  Any unsprung weight is a good thing, unless you fill 'yer tiers with concrete.


Edited by marlboro180, January 24, 2014 - 10:48 PM.


#30 Cat385B ONLINE  

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Posted January 24, 2014 - 10:49 PM

How much did you end up adding?






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