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Any Downside To Filling Rear Tires With Fluid?


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#1 TGaffney OFFLINE  

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Posted January 04, 2014 - 10:02 PM

Hi folks,

 

I have a 1969 Bolens 1225 that I am thinking of adding fluid to the rear tires on.  I have wheel weights but was thinking an additional 40 to 50 pounds of weight per tire would be an added benefit for snowblowing or plowing.  I have some hills on my property so extra traction is helpfull. 

 

Are there any downside issues like wear and tear on the rear end that I should know about and consider prior to going forward?

 

Thanks for your input.


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#2 blackjackjakexxix ONLINE  

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Posted January 04, 2014 - 10:11 PM

Hi, anytime you add weight theres always a chance to hurt something,I have the tires loaded on my HT-20 with window washer fluid and the factory 50 lb weights on ea wheel,I just don't hot dog it,and have been fine for years now


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#3 MyBolens1053 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 04, 2014 - 10:20 PM

Choices of what you put in your tires is going to depend several factors.

 

Beet juice is preferred by farmers since it won't freeze easily and is eco-friendly. Downside is the cost and doesn't stop a leak.

 

Washer fluid if you are not worried of what goes in your ground if you spring a leak. Cheaper, but, toxic to the earth.

 

Some will use tire Slime so if a leak does occur it plugs up right away. Downsides are real messy when you do need to change your tire and can pit the insides of the metal wheel over time. Costly from the start.

 

Stay away from anti-freeze due to poisoning wildlife and pets.

 

There may be more choices so research many sources.


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#4 Bolens 1000 ONLINE  

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Posted January 04, 2014 - 10:25 PM

I've never been a fan of loaded tires but others seem to like them.


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#5 wvbuzzmaster OFFLINE  

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Posted January 04, 2014 - 10:38 PM

As long as you know your tractors limits, have tubes in your tires, the tires are not rotted, and can find RimGuard, you will be fine. I put RimGuard in one of my tractors and planning another one next year. Personally, I put tubes in new tires and if going to fill, have the rims painted like I want before mounting tires and loading with fluid. It is a good system and the RimGuard is a good product, you will never regret it. So far the tires lasted zero degree temperature last night, so still good.
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#6 GlenPettit OFFLINE  

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Posted January 04, 2014 - 11:29 PM

I think the biggest downside is just when you have to remove the tire, it's heavy.  You want lighter tires in the summer for mowing and would need a second set just for that.

Repairs: most leaks are small and I think the Rim Guard kinda seals those up itself, if a big leak like a nail, then park with the hole up until you can change it or plug it with a regular plug, with the fluid still in there.

Don't forget to add weight to the front tires also, this is very important.

 

 

Here's some more information:   http://gardentractor...weights-needed/


Edited by GlenPettit, January 04, 2014 - 11:33 PM.

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#7 Jack OFFLINE  

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Posted January 04, 2014 - 11:43 PM

Anyone ever try that pink RV antifreeze?  I think that stuff is pretty non toxic.   I don't know but it seems like that stuff might work pretty well.


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#8 Cat385B ONLINE  

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Posted January 05, 2014 - 12:19 AM

I consider liquid weight the best option there is. You need good, clean rims and tires that are in good shape or tubes. They're a little harder to handle when filled, and if you sprout a leak you're going to have a mess.

That's it for the negatives.

It puts the weight exactly where you need it, where the rubber meets the road. It is pushing down on the bottom of the tire. Not on the rim, not on the axle, and not on the frame of the tractor; which is where you put it when you put on wheel weights, a rear weight box, etc. It doesn't hurt a darn thing to have it there year around. The only extra stress it's putting on the machine is when you initially take off, or start to brake. And that is nothing compared to the comparable extra force needed when you have 50 pound wheel weights on.

 

I have not needed wheel weights on any of my tractors for snowblowing duty.

1. JD 212: Got the blower on, built a rear weight box and added chains, tossed the box after loading the tires.

2. Homelite T15H: It came with loaded turfs with chains. Replaced the turfs with Firestone R1's, and loaded those to 58 pounds each with WWF. No chains or extra weight necessary.

3. Bolens G152: Came with loaded tires and chains, haven't touched them other than to paint them. Never took the tires off, they are loaded with RV antifreeze. Not much, probably 5 or 6 gallons each tire.

 

Like Casey said, Rimguard is the best option for liquid, but isn't the cheapest.


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#9 8tyman8 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 05, 2014 - 01:58 AM

Choices of what you put in your tires is going to depend several factors.

 

Beet juice is preferred by farmers since it won't freeze easily and is eco-friendly. Downside is the cost and doesn't stop a leak.

 

Washer fluid if you are not worried of what goes in your ground if you spring a leak. Cheaper, but, toxic to the earth.

 

Some will use tire Slime so if a leak does occur it plugs up right away. Downsides are real messy when you do need to change your tire and can pit the insides of the metal wheel over time. Costly from the start.

 

Stay away from anti-freeze due to poisoning wildlife and pets.

 

There may be more choices so research many sources.

The Way I look at washer fluid It must be Somewhat eco frendly because when it comes out the Squiters on your car it goes on the window onto the ground then into the drains..then into lakes


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#10 wvbuzzmaster OFFLINE  

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Posted January 05, 2014 - 02:44 AM

Like Casey said, Rimguard is the best option for liquid, but isn't the cheapest.

It isn't all that bad depending on the RimGuard dealer you deal with. Smaller dealers might not even charge labor to fill the gt tires, such as the one I went to. All said and done it was around 4 dollars a gallon for the RimGuard. One gallon of cheap antifreeze is around 7 dollars a gallon, but you only need half as much since it is mixed 50-50. And windsheild washer fluid is about 3 dollars a gallon but you can not mix it 50-50 like antifreeze. But then that isn't even looking at the weight per gallon, which here is a quick comparison there.

To make calculations easy I will use 10 gallons.
RimGuard is 11 pounds per gallon giving around 110 pounds at $40
Windsheild washer fluid is 8 pounds per gallon giving around 80 pounds at $30
Antifreeze mixed at 50-50 is 8 pounds per gallon giving around 80 pounds at $35

Now for the fun part, the price per pound.
RimGuard is 36.4 cents per pound
Windsheild washer fluid is 37.5 cents per pound
Antifreeze is 43.75 cents per pound

All numbers calculated are approximate, and pricing will vary a little, but you get the idea. By the way, on a gt, don't you want the most weight per gallon in these small tires?

Edited by wvbuzzmaster, January 05, 2014 - 02:46 AM.

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#11 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted January 05, 2014 - 03:14 AM

Cat did the explanation, Casey crunched the numbers. I'm just here to agree and say that loading is a very good way to gain a little extra traction without having things hanging out the side of the tractor (stacked wheel weights) or a big box behind.

I used WWF and got around 6-7 gal per tire. I stress the importance of tubes here, but make darn sure they are the right sized tubes. A lot of them are undersized and you will not get as much fluid in there.
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#12 OldBuzzard ONLINE  

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Posted January 05, 2014 - 03:29 AM

:ditto:

 

Rim Guard is far and away the best way to add weight.

 

Its bio-degradable, non-toxic, non-corrosive, and won't freeze until @  -35*.

 

The only downside to it is it stinks to high heaven if you ever have a leak, and you MUST use metal valve stems.

 

As for cost, that's a grey  area, as it seems some dealers want to rape people with the pricing.  I've seen folks complain about high cost.  In my case my local JD AG dealer charged me $2.30/Gal which included the installation cost.

 

As for "not needing weight in the summer"? Lots of people need it for traction on slopes when the grass is wet/damp.  That extra weight is sometimes the difference between climbing the slope or spinning the tires and tearing up the turf.

 

The other important thing that fluid filling tires give is that it puts most of the added weight BELOW the axle, which aids in stability if you are on a slope.

 

Yeah, the tires weigh more when you mount/dismount them, but how often would you do that? 

 

I've mounted a set of 26-12-12 tires with 110# of Rim Guard in each of them, and it wasn't all that big a job, even for me, a light in the butt old fart.

 

How many of you have tried to mount a 110# wheel weight?  I have, and trust me, there was no way that I would have been able to do it without my trusty forklift.

 

Finally, with fluid filled tires you still have the option of adding MORE weight via wheel weights.

 

The advantages of fluid in the tires, especially Rim Guard, far outweigh any disadvantages.


Edited by OldBuzzard, January 05, 2014 - 03:31 AM.

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#13 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted January 05, 2014 - 08:45 AM

Weight of the tires is a big one if you have to handle them. A manageable 50lb 26x12x12 wheel becomes 150lbs which is a bear to wrestle with. On larger tractors loaded tires are unmanageable without special equipment. The wheel weight is not borne by the axle so it doesn't add any stress there. There is an inertia effect when you reduce speed. I'm not sure if this can cause issues with some transmissions but if you stay within the manufacturers recommendations you should be fine. 


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#14 Cat385B ONLINE  

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Posted January 05, 2014 - 08:51 AM

And windsheild washer fluid is about 3 dollars a gallon but you can not mix it 50-50 like antifreeze.

 

Quit buying it at a gas station, most large stores have it at half that price.


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#15 MyBolens1053 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 05, 2014 - 08:57 AM

:ditto:

 

Rim Guard is far and away the best way to add weight.

 

Its bio-degradable, non-toxic, non-corrosive, and won't freeze until @  -35*.

 

The only downside to it is it stinks to high heaven if you ever have a leak, and you MUST use metal valve stems.

 

As for cost, that's a grey  area, as it seems some dealers want to rape people with the pricing.  I've seen folks complain about high cost.  In my case my local JD AG dealer charged me $2.30/Gal which included the installation cost.

 

As for "not needing weight in the summer"? Lots of people need it for traction on slopes when the grass is wet/damp.  That extra weight is sometimes the difference between climbing the slope or spinning the tires and tearing up the turf.

 

The other important thing that fluid filling tires give is that it puts most of the added weight BELOW the axle, which aids in stability if you are on a slope.

 

Yeah, the tires weigh more when you mount/dismount them, but how often would you do that? 

 

I've mounted a set of 26-12-12 tires with 110# of Rim Guard in each of them, and it wasn't all that big a job, even for me, a light in the butt old fart.

 

How many of you have tried to mount a 110# wheel weight?  I have, and trust me, there was no way that I would have been able to do it without my trusty forklift.

 

Finally, with fluid filled tires you still have the option of adding MORE weight via wheel weights.

 

The advantages of fluid in the tires, especially Rim Guard, far outweigh any disadvantages.

 

OB, you should become an endorsed spokesman for RimGuard after that sales pitch. You got me sold.  :rolling:  And maybe you can get your next need of RimGuard at cost or FREE. :dancingbanana:


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