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Oysters, Not The Prairie Variety


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#1 oldedeeres ONLINE  

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Posted December 27, 2013 - 04:29 PM

We try to have at least one "seafood feast" over the holidays, and oysters are usually on the menu, generally dipped in beaten eggs and milk, rolled in cracker crumbs and fried in butter. Any other ideas out there? Somehow or other eating them on the half shell, raw, just doesn't appeal to us.
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#2 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted December 27, 2013 - 04:51 PM

One of the disadvantages of living on the land  Locked Central Plains is the fact that any sea food is expensive and to get it fresh it has to be flown in by plane every day. Particularly if your like me and absolutely love the stuff!!  When I was a kid my dad would buy Oysters every New Years and they was usually  fixed just as you describe.  They are also very good in a chowder or soup. Or I have had some very good dressing made with Oysters.  A holiday tradition at our house is a creamy sea food soup the wife makes with Shrimp and clams. The only drawback to that is I usually eat way more of it than I should?

She does not use the Oysters in it because she does not care for them. In fact I'm the only one at my house that does.  I don't get to eat nearly enoug Oysters!!

 

I would like to spend a month of vacation on the coast one time and see if I could eat enough sea food to get tired of it!!


Edited by JD DANNELS, December 27, 2013 - 04:56 PM.

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#3 Cat385B OFFLINE  

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Posted December 27, 2013 - 05:31 PM

Oyster stew.

 

Equal parts oysters and whole milk. Do not drain oysters. Heat separately, milk warm, oysters near a boil. Combine, then heat near to a boil. Add a whole stick (yep, a quarter pound) of butter just before you serve it up.


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#4 Team_Green OFFLINE  

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Posted December 27, 2013 - 06:18 PM

Oysters.. Cooked??? Nooooooooooooooo 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Keep in mind i'm 3/4 dutch and we eat some really strange and disgusting stuff...


Edited by Team_Green, December 27, 2013 - 06:18 PM.

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#5 TerryD OFFLINE  

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Posted December 27, 2013 - 07:28 PM

I love 'em too. The best raw ones I ever had was in New Orleans. Next to that is a seafood soup made with oysters, clams, any white fish celery, tomatoes, garlic, and whatever spices you like. I think it's called cioppino. Google it, it's very tasty.
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#6 olcowhand OFFLINE  

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Posted December 27, 2013 - 08:03 PM

Oyster stew.

 

Equal parts oysters and whole milk. Do not drain oysters. Heat separately, milk warm, oysters near a boil. Combine, then heat near to a boil. Add a whole stick (yep, a quarter pound) of butter just before you serve it up.

 

Yep, just like I like em too!  Real butter too, not margarine.  Plenty of course ground black pepper, and I prefer regular saltine crackers.  I don't care at all for the special "Oyster Crackers".


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#7 olcowhand OFFLINE  

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Posted December 27, 2013 - 08:04 PM

I tried raw, but raw anything isn't my thing.


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#8 Arti OFFLINE  

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Posted December 27, 2013 - 09:56 PM

Many thanks for posting this. I suddenly remember my Grandmother standing at the kitchen range making oyster soup.

Oysters, milk, butter and black pepper was the main ingredients along with fresh baked bread make from scratch.
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#9 olcowhand OFFLINE  

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Posted December 27, 2013 - 10:00 PM

After this thread, Teresa & I had oyster stew for supper!  I am down to 30 or so cans of oysters now. LOL  My salvage grocery place has tons of it for just $1.25 a can.  Normally almost $3/can or more.  I buy 8 or 10 cans every other week.   :thumbs:


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#10 oldedeeres ONLINE  

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Posted December 27, 2013 - 11:11 PM

Thanks to all---  oyster soup it is!!  Maybe there's more to that Dutch thing than you know, Team Green, Oldedeere #,2's grandmother was born in Holland as were her grandfather's parents, and she eats pickled herring, oysters, and sometimes other  weird stuff as well, lol  I'll look up the cioppino as well just for good measure.


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#11 Team_Green OFFLINE  

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Posted December 27, 2013 - 11:25 PM

Thanks to all---  oyster soup it is!!  Maybe there's more to that Dutch thing than you know, Team Green, Oldedeere #,2's grandmother was born in Holland as were her grandfather's parents, and she eats pickled herring, oysters, and sometimes other  weird stuff as well, lol  I'll look up the cioppino as well just for good measure.

 

My mom was born there my fathers grand father was from there. grandma on his side was scottish..  Christmas dinner when the whole family was together had some strange foods. Most folks invited usually didn't eat much.. not that i can blame them just by looking at the table.. 


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#12 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted December 27, 2013 - 11:42 PM

My mom was born there my fathers grand father was from there. grandma on his side was scottish..  Christmas dinner when the whole family was together had some strange foods. Most folks invited usually didn't eat much.. not that i can blame them just by looking at the table..

Well Ihave to say based on starting about 10 miles south of Newton and 40 miles south in a band about 60 miles long the majority of people are of Dutch heritage (including 3 cousins, with a mother being the first generation born in the states).
While there is some strange table fare, there s also some outstanding food served. Particularly pasteries and the best bolona and dried beef I have found anywhere, I am never reluctant to put my feet under the table in a Dutch Home.
On my uncles farm there were 6 meals served per day, Because in a Dutch home the most important meal of the day is Coffe Time in the morning and afternnoon.
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#13 Team_Green OFFLINE  

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Posted December 28, 2013 - 01:05 AM

Well Ihave to say based on starting about 10 miles south of Newton and 40 miles south in a band about 60 miles long the majority of people are of Dutch heritage (including 3 cousins, with a mother being the first generation born in the states).
While there is some strange table fare, there s also some outstanding food served. Particularly pasteries and the best bolona and dried beef I have found anywhere, I am never reluctant to put my feet under the table in a Dutch Home.
On my uncles farm there were 6 meals served per day, Because in a Dutch home the most important meal of the day is Coffe Time in the morning and afternnoon.

My mom never learned to cook as she was the middle girl of 7. She worked the sugar beat fields when old enough.  So our table fair while growing up was blood sausage and such.. my father is a great cook but not home often.. I grew up took cooking in school and continue to further myself in cooking..


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#14 crittersf1 OFFLINE  

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Posted December 28, 2013 - 07:55 AM

Steamed is my favorite with horseradish and hot sauce.


Edited by crittersf1, December 28, 2013 - 07:56 AM.

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#15 TerryD OFFLINE  

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Posted December 30, 2013 - 08:11 AM

Geesh, you guys are making me hungry. :wave:


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