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#16 Markski OFFLINE  

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Posted September 25, 2014 - 11:44 PM

The Carbide Lamps were still in common use back in the 50's and early 60's here in Iowa. Primarily by Coonhunters, Trappers, nightcrawler hunters and often farmers in remote areas etc. Poachers were know to put a little carbide, water in a mason jar sealed the top tightly and throw it in the river to blast for fish. (Never did that but knew the guys who did.)  Used them myself back in the day hunting nightcrawlers.

They were common in use until the battery powered "Wheat Lights" became easily aquired.

 

My uncle used to run his Cutting torch using a huge Brass Boiler like apparatus called an Acetelene Generator, that simply had a water tank and dropped Carbide pellets into the tank. The Carbide Regulator and acetelene feed controls were very ingenious pieces of work.

 

Okie Gt you have something there! I think due to the explosive qualitys of Carbide while available it is pretty hevily regualted.

omg, None of that sounds safe! I'm more appreciative than ever for rechargeable spotlights and alkaline batteries. And I'll just keep buying acetylene in steel tanks!


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#17 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted September 26, 2014 - 01:51 PM

actually it is probably as safe as any new technology so long as you understand and know what your doing and use with sense..

Now I will admit the rechargeable lights are safer in an underground mining operation where there is a danger of igniting methane gas in coal mines. But then again the carbide generator lights were used in mines for over 100 yrs with few accidents.
The Coal mines for the most part had played out in Iowa before I was born, but remember my great uncle talking about working on hands and knees in a tunnel barely wider than a mans shoulders chopping coal from beneath the ground.

#18 Bill 76 ONLINE  

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Posted September 27, 2014 - 04:11 AM

You can still buy all the carbide ya want off e bay,When it was still cheap I would sprinkle some on the side walk after a rain and toss a match to it,the kids loved it.



#19 toomanytoys84 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 10, 2014 - 08:45 PM

actually it is probably as safe as any new technology so long as you understand and know what your doing and use with sense..

Now I will admit the rechargeable lights are safer in an underground mining operation where there is a danger of igniting methane gas in coal mines. But then again the carbide generator lights were used in mines for over 100 yrs with few accidents.
The Coal mines for the most part had played out in Iowa before I was born, but remember my great uncle talking about working on hands and knees in a tunnel barely wider than a mans shoulders chopping coal from beneath the ground.


Now we have nice cordless battery led lights. So bright and last a double shift.

Pretty nice.

I have a pretty good collection of brass carbide lamps.

#20 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted October 14, 2014 - 11:39 AM

Now we have nice cordless battery led lights. So bright and last a double shift.
Pretty nice.
I have a pretty good collection of brass carbide lamps.

Yes I would ot say we should go back in time! but they workked

#21 toomanytoys84 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 14, 2014 - 12:10 PM

Yes I would ot say we should go back in time! but they worked

 

Go back further.  Candles on their head.  My grandfather was old enough to remember being in a coal mine with a carbide lamp on his head. 

 

I've always been big into coal mining history and such.  Quite a few miners in my family, and I've been working at the mines for 11 years now.  Love it.

 

http://www.ramshorns...iners_lamps.htm

 

b1030a.jpg

 

20ba82020.jpg


Edited by toomanytoys84, October 14, 2014 - 12:17 PM.


#22 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted October 14, 2014 - 12:56 PM

Go back further. Candles on their head. My grandfather was old enough to remember being in a coal mine with a carbide lamp on his head.

I've always been big into coal mining history and such. Quite a few miners in my family, and I've been working at the mines for 11 years now. Love it.

http://www.ramshorns...iners_lamps.htm

b1030a.jpg

SINCE your into mining history you might find it interesting to know that John L. Lewis was born about 40 miles away near LUCAS IOWA. My grandfathers first farm was about 15 miles from Lucas.

20ba82020.jpg

You have to go back a couple generations to find mining in my ancestry. My grandfather and Great uncle mined some to get a stake to get into farming. Grandpa died on my first birthday, but I remeber uncle Willard talk about being on his hands and knees in a cut barely wider than his shoulders chopping coal out. Actually he was very young when he did that.
Most of the coal in Iowa was strip mined. When I bought my Ford 1500 my dad pointed out where he hauled coal out of the hills when I was a baby. THe coal played out and one of the biggest strip pit areas is now an off road park where the bikes and 4 wheelers play.

Edited by JD DANNELS, October 14, 2014 - 01:03 PM.

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#23 holdenboy1960 OFFLINE  

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Posted February 13, 2015 - 06:39 AM

I reckon it  is a Bench mount multi hole leather punch 






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