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A Question For The Farmers


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#1 David Brown OFFLINE  

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Posted December 20, 2013 - 12:50 PM

I remember when I was younger, a good bit of the corn and grain seemed to be harvested by the time the weather changed.  What didn't get harvested more than likely stayed in the field until spring when the farmer would come back and try to salvage what he could before spring plowing (remember that?).  Well, in recent years (particularly this year) I noticed that a lot of the crops didn't get harvested before the snow hit.  I figured they would be in the fields until spring but I'm seeing crews out harvesting in the snow and rain.  This may be normal but I've never seen them do that before.  My question is, is this being done out of desperation or have they found that it really doesn't matter what the moisture content is when harvested or are they doing it simply because modern equipment has allowed them to be able to accomplish the harvest in any weather?  I figured it was either the last one or this batch of younger farmers really don't know what they are doing.


Edited by David Brown, December 20, 2013 - 12:51 PM.

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#2 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted December 20, 2013 - 01:43 PM

Ii remember when I was young farmers often got caught late in the fall and with fall rains the fields would get muddy. They would wait till the ground froze and they could get equipment back in the field without going down in the mud. I am sure that over the years varieties of corn matured early enough that it could be out earlier. I think the wet spring early this year  caught a lot of farmers with corn that had not matured and dried down till late? With having to replant a lot of acres this year I think that contributed as well..

 

I remember many times as a child riding in the wagon at thanksgiving while grandpa picked corn.  My job was to kick down the piles of ears so he could fill the wagon.


Edited by JDBrian, December 20, 2013 - 03:55 PM.
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#3 David Brown OFFLINE  

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Posted December 20, 2013 - 01:52 PM

That makes sense.  I hadn't even considered the ground being frozen.  It probably just depends on the year and I never really noticed it until recently.


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#4 ckjakline OFFLINE  

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Posted December 20, 2013 - 03:38 PM

I know depending on you location,if you had a good year and all the crops did well there wasn't enough storage.Feed companys would be full and not accepting grain.Farmers that don't have there own storage and don't get it to the grain company before there full,they're out of luck.They have to let it stand until somebody is accepting again.A few years ago a farmer my grandfather knew had to let his stand until January.He didn't want to pay trucking to my grandfathers.So that might be a reason for crops standing.


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#5 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted December 20, 2013 - 04:15 PM

That is a good point too.  I live within 2 miles of two elevators one ajoins my property. I have not seen that one store outside. But see trucks going out of there every morning when I'm leaving for work.

But the Coop two miles away will often have corn piles tree top high exposed to the elements. I have often wondered how much was lost to spoilage?  They also have a lot of bin storage.

 If farmers have to pay for storage at the elevator it could be more profitable to leave it in the field till it can be sold.

It has been 40 yrs plus since I knew how much per bushel/per month was charged for storage.


Edited by JD DANNELS, December 20, 2013 - 04:19 PM.

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#6 Lance Skene OFFLINE  

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Posted December 20, 2013 - 05:47 PM

Weather permitting the crops have to be in by freeze up or the commercial value isnt worth paying storage on, sometimes insurance pays better, but mother nature makes new rules every year.


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#7 Arti ONLINE  

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Posted December 20, 2013 - 05:58 PM

Some of the corn was planted in a timely manner locally However it started to rain and held up the field work for about 3 weeks this spring.

Some of the corn was testing in the 30 percent range in this area when it was harvest time, it really doesn't combine very well at that moisture content.
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#8 Cat385B ONLINE  

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Posted December 20, 2013 - 06:17 PM

Genetic advances in the plants have made a difference also. 20 years ago you would of had loss due to stalks shattering when hit and ears dropping to the ground before the head could reel them in. Plants stand better now, and it doesn't hurt that the harvestor is going as fast as a commercial ZTR doing the back side of school.


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#9 Nato77 OFFLINE  

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Posted December 20, 2013 - 07:52 PM

Genetic advances in the plants have made a difference also. 20 years ago you would of had loss due to stalks shattering when hit and ears dropping to the ground before the head could reel them in. Plants stand better now, and it doesn't hurt that the harvestor is going as fast as a commercial ZTR doing the back side of school.

Only if they didn't plant Pioneer. A lot of farmers around here were complaining about Pioneer this year. It was wetter, lower yields and falling down compared to other seed company's. I don't know if it was just certain numbers or all of it.

 

Everyone around here was done in a timely manner, except for the guys who think their "super" farmers and run to much land.


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#10 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted December 21, 2013 - 10:45 AM

Speaking of Pioneer, They have a huge lab facility, acres of greenhouses and test plots all along the river bottom just north of Des Moines. With all the talk about genetically modified varieties and the foreign countries not accepting any genetically modified corn.
I found it ironic that 6 Chinese immigrants have been endited for stealing corn from their test plots in the last couple weeks.
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#11 oldedeeres OFFLINE  

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Posted December 23, 2013 - 01:47 AM

There isn't much corn grown in my part of the country although there were a couple of fields that we saw that were combined, not used for silage or row grazed. I'm noticing that as the farms are getting bigger it's taking longer to get the crops off, but the use of grain dryers is really becoming a factor and they are taking the crop off tougher and drying it. They may lose a grade or two, but at least it is off before it's a total loss. I sure hate to see the small holdings disappearing, but as in so many things "bigger is better" seems to be the currant wisdom.




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