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Tire Chain Bungees?


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#1 hatedge OFFLINE  

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Posted December 17, 2013 - 10:03 PM

When installing tire chains why do I need to install bungees?


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#2 David Brown OFFLINE  

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Posted December 17, 2013 - 10:06 PM

You don't HAVE to if you can get your chains tight enough.  If your tires are not liquid filled, you can let the air out, install the chains and re-inflate the tire.  They'll never move that way.  If that is not possible you may need something to hold the chains a little tighter so they don't "walk".


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#3 bgkid2966 OFFLINE  

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Posted December 17, 2013 - 10:09 PM

I do not use any. I make sure my chains are extremely tight when they latch. They seem to loosen up no matter what you do. Mine do not loosen up very much any more. Some people let air out of the tires and then tighten the chains. When tight refill tires to desired pressure.

 

 

 

Geno


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#4 motobreeder OFFLINE  

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Posted December 18, 2013 - 12:29 AM

I find the bungee cords help make take out some of the high-pitch chain rattling.


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#5 OldBuzzard ONLINE  

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Posted December 18, 2013 - 12:54 AM

When I got a set of chains for the HT20D, I got them from tirechains.com, and got a set of the tensioners as well, just in case.  They may not be helping that much, as the chains were pretty tight after I got them on, but I'm guessing that they don't hurt either.

http://www.tirechain...DEN_TRACTOR.HTM


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#6 Cvans ONLINE  

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Posted December 18, 2013 - 01:07 AM

I guess I just deflate and install the chains as tight as I can and then re-inflate. Never needed anything else. The loader tractor runs chains all year around and there has never been a problem with them coming loose.


Edited by Cvans, December 18, 2013 - 01:08 AM.

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#7 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted December 18, 2013 - 08:02 AM

I use the Heavy Duty black rubber straps instead of bungees. They are 50lb pull so can exert a lot of force to keep things tight. I'm using a set of heavy chains on my JD2320. They weigh about 60lbs each and are a lot heavier than most GT chains. If you can deflate your tires to install them that will help a lot. 


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#8 GlenPettit OFFLINE  

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Posted December 18, 2013 - 08:55 AM

•  When the temperature drops to 10-15ºF, that will lower the actual PSI inside your tires to often 3-4PSI less, compressing the tire size and allowing the chains to loosen. Slightly loose chains will have the cross links bunch up, reducing traction, cause more driveway damage and give a very bumpy ride.

•  Driving in third gear will loosen the chains (may hit under fender).

•  Bungees are a good idea, best if on the inside of the tire side (less snow to hit), and the thick black rubber ones (don't use the cloth covered cheap ones) that are USA made are best for both UV life & strength [we still can make some darn good products over here, you get what you pay for, and Safety should be #1, you don't want a bungee to fail while working].


Edited by GlenPettit, December 18, 2013 - 04:04 PM.

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#9 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted December 18, 2013 - 10:36 AM

•  When the temperature drops to 10-15ºF, that will lower the actual PSI inside your tires to often 3-4PSI less, compressing the tire size and allowing the chains to loosen. Slightly loose chains will have the cross links bunch up, reducing traction, cause more driveway damage and give a very bumpy ride.

•  Driving in third gear will loosen the chains (may hit under fender).

•  Bungees are a good idea, best if on the inside of the tire side (less snow to hit).

Brian and Glen make a good point. My ford had 9.5X24 tires and my set of chains in a 5 gal bucket is more than I care to lift.

If the going is good and I run the lane in 3rd gear Cenerefugal force will sling the chains out and bang on the fender.

Even when I have the chains as tight as I can get them. So I also use the Heavy Black Tarp Straps. I buy the ones long enough that I can run them under the main carrier chain and then hook them back on the other side of the wheel(basically doubling them.

In my opinion it helps keep them from coming loose and trust me there is no fun involved in throwing a chain and having to reinstall it in a snow bank.


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#10 Talntedmrgreen OFFLINE  

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Posted December 18, 2013 - 10:41 AM

They may not be helping that much, as the chains were pretty tight after I got them on, but I'm guessing that they don't hurt either.

 

 

yup....that's where I stand on it too.  I have all sorts of bungies laying around, and the last thing I need is a chain walking off, when I'm half way down the street, during the big storm of the year, while trying to be a good samaritan.  :wallbanging:   Nothing worse than busting your hump to get the job done, then having to get on your hands and knees in the snow and wrestle a chain.

 

That being said, before I used bungies, I rarely had any issues with a chain walking off, but I also prefer not to put more than a minute or two into each chain, when installing.  I'm not farting around with letting air out, etc.  I lay them out, roll over them, pull them snug, latch, bungie, and don't look at them again until I take them off in the spring. :thumbs: 


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#11 hatedge OFFLINE  

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Posted December 18, 2013 - 10:17 PM

Thanks mates for all them answers. Whe I said bungee I meant the black rubber type and not the nickel and dime kind.

I installed chains on a forklift at work and they fitted quite nicely, to the point that I couldnt see the need to buy bungees. I installed the chains, drove back and forth a few yards retighten the chains and voilà! I wish the chains on my GTs were as good a fit as the ones my boss got for the forklift...although he paid 300$ for a pair o chains !!! Mine cost about 120$ and they are pretty much the same size






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