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Struck Magnatrac Rs196K Mail Order Kit Opinions


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#1 nglauer OFFLINE  

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Posted December 07, 2013 - 07:37 PM

So I was looking at small little dozers used online when I ran across information on a Struck Magnatrac RS196K kit? Does anyone have any opinions on these? Is it worth the money? How capable are these? I have a bunch of multifloral rose on our property that i would like to rip out and would like something to grade a small road to our barn. I'm just curious if one of these would have any advantages over my Bolens HT23.... other than it looks like it would be a really cool project for my son, daughter and I. Does anyone have experience with this or other models? I think one with hydraulics would be better but kinda expensive. Just curious what kind of projects I could pull off with one of these smaller strucks?

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#2 boyscout862 OFFLINE  

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Posted December 07, 2013 - 08:10 PM

I'm curious too. How much is the kit? How much more do you have to add to finish it? That HT23 is a pretty good machine, but even with the sickle attachment you would be to close to those thorns. The mf rose is tough stuff and if it was a large area I'd be tending towards using a big dozer. Good Luck, Rick

#3 HowardsMF155 OFFLINE  

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Posted December 07, 2013 - 08:27 PM

When you say "multiflora rose" I say "Gravely".  Why don't you have a look at these two posts to see what a Gravely can do with brush and thorns.  Personally, I think the arrangement of the Gravely, with the mower well out in front of the tractor, gives the operator the best protection from stuff like that.  Once you cut it down, you can keep it cut and allow other stuff to grow up, maybe choke out the multiflora rose for good.

 

http://gardentractor...g-etc/?p=187254

 

http://gardentractor...g-etc/?p=201536

 

I'm not sure what tasks you have in mind when you want to build a road.  Are there hills that need to be cut down, gulleys to fill in?  Or do you want to spread a load of gravel?  



#4 nglauer OFFLINE  

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Posted December 07, 2013 - 09:43 PM

It's fairly flat here, I was looking at it as more of a project for the kids and I. I was thinking snow removal, smoothing our road to the barn, clearing brush, leveling of the creek banks, maybe dragging around smaller timber, driveway maintenance. It would be cool if it could handle some implements like a brush cutter/hog etc. but it looks like you need the next model up which isn't available as a kit. I think the price is around 3400-3600.00 but I don't know for sure. I requested a catalog and pricing. I believe the kit includes everything and uses a Honda motor - but I read that you can custom order it with different options

#5 Utah Smitty OFFLINE  

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Posted December 07, 2013 - 11:32 PM

It's fairly flat here, I was looking at it as more of a project for the kids and I. I was thinking snow removal, smoothing our road to the barn, clearing brush, leveling of the creek banks, maybe dragging around smaller timber, driveway maintenance. It would be cool if it could handle some implements like a brush cutter/hog etc. but it looks like you need the next model up which isn't available as a kit. I think the price is around 3400-3600.00 but I don't know for sure. I requested a catalog and pricing. I believe the kit includes everything and uses a Honda motor - but I read that you can custom order it with different options

I've seen an older model of it--powered with a Tecumseh motor.  Belt and Chain drive to the tracks.  It would be handy, especially in boggy areas because of the lower ground pressure.  I don't know how good it would do for clearing bushes, etc. as they aren't very heavy... probably not much more than your HT23.

 

Smitty



#6 glgrumpy ONLINE  

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Posted December 08, 2013 - 02:40 AM

Kits again?? Have to go look there. I got a video and info many years ago on some offerings, haven't looked back since. I heard they started to make a model similar to the original unit, but hadn't looked.  You used to be able to buy those in kit form or even just the plans to build it all. They were belt drive and TEC engines and I don't think they had that much power, more of a play thing. I would almost think your Bolens would have more power and easier time working a blade or rear box than must little Struck vehicles.



#7 nglauer OFFLINE  

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Posted December 08, 2013 - 03:13 AM

I don't really need one - just thought it would be a really cool project for the kids and I. Between the BX24, HT23, HT20, IH 504, Cub Loboy154, Cub Cadet 1641, and all the various attachments I shouldn't have any issues doing most of the above (although the creek banks etc. would probably be easier with one of these). However - this is pretty cool and would be a fun little snow moving, driveway grading, brush moving, conversation creating toy (if the price wasn't to outrageous). I saw where someone posted in the comments of this video that it was just a hair over 3000.00... but i don't know how accurate that is.

 

https://www.youtube....h?v=NIUI3fLwBLg



#8 nglauer OFFLINE  

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Posted December 08, 2013 - 03:26 AM

Here is a link to the pricing and options -

 

http://www.struckcor...Attachments.pdf

 

http://www.struckcor...ru 11.15.13.pdf



#9 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted December 08, 2013 - 08:50 AM

Being I own a small 9,600lb high lift crawler, I can't imagine these little machines being able to do much work.  In the video, the dirt is loose.  Drop that blade into anything hard, and it'll likely just spin those tracks.  Slick conditions it just won't do good with at all unless some traction bars are welded to the flat track pads for bite.  

  BUT, they would be fun to play with, and wouldbe a great project for the kids as you said.



#10 glgrumpy ONLINE  

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Posted December 08, 2013 - 01:01 PM

All those kits are really neat and they have good videos of a very good "handler" on them. Just noticed the price is for an "Unpainted" kit.  Another time set-back for building.  Think they would at least be primed parts, so as not to rust?  Doesn't say. One can order the manual to look over first, that is way to go if serious. Listed over $4000 but discounted here on some offer?? Lot of money for a "toy".   Would think a used Cut or SCut  is better deal.


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#11 WH55 OFFLINE  

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Posted December 08, 2013 - 05:37 PM

I was thinking about one of these myself after I saw the link to the company on the Heavy Equipment Forum. I posted a similar topic and got a reply from a fellow up in Canad who built an earlier version of this little gem. He really enjoys his and has made some modifications to it so that it works more like a larger machine. In his first reply to me he posted some photos of his machine which used electric winches to raise and lower the blade and rear attachments. The only thing he had on the rear was the winch mounted on a bood to use for skidding a small log to his splitter to turn into firewood. He also mentioned he was going to add a linear actuator to replace the winch for the blade in order to get some down pressure.

 

We had another exchange after he did that and he said it had worked out well for him except that he was having problems with the end of the actutator breaking when the blade twisted on hard, uneven ground. I haven't been on there again to see if he's been able to find a fix to it.

 

One of the main reasons I considered buying one of these kits was to give me and my nephew a neat project to work on over the winter, which unfortunately is not going to work out. In your particular case, Nglauer. I'd reccommend it if for no other reason than to give the kids a nice memory of working with Dad on something practical. As for its capabilities as working machine, so long as you recognize its limits, I think it will work well for you. I believe there is a ripper attachment available which should come in handy if you can use a linear actuator to provide some down pressure for it.

 

Of course it won't be nearly as capable as a small farm dozer like JD350 or similar machine, but those come with their own sets of problems. Based on my own experiences, I've got some misgivings on owning much equipment with hydraulic actuators. For one thing they can be pretty messy, especially when a hose fails. And unless you already have experience operating such equipment, the learning curve can be pretty steep.

 

I learned most of my mechanical skills from my father who once owned a gas station and garage. We worked on everything when I was a kid, cars lawn mowers, and once even an old Mecury two stroke outboard motor. My Dad wasn't the most patient teacher in the world but he left me with a love of all things mechanical. Garden Tractors are a replacement hobby for me, as for most nearly 30 years I worked at an operating railroad museum located in Connersville, IN called the Whitewater Valley Railroad on the weekends. i'm retired on disability now and garden tractors are a poor substitute for diesel and steam locomotives on the one hand. On the other they are small enough for me to work on them without over exerting myself and they fit rather well into my two car garage.

 

I have no kids of my own, but rather have nephews whom I love as I would my own sons. The oldest grew up working with me on the Whitewater Valley, but the younger one is more interested in cars than trains. As I said earlier. this thing makes a nice father/children project and passes on some valuable skills and knowledge that will be helpful to your children years from now as they live their own lives. There is great value in that, to me.


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#12 Utah Smitty OFFLINE  

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Posted December 08, 2013 - 09:30 PM

. i'm retired on disability now and garden tractors are a poor substitute for diesel and steam locomotives on the one hand. On the other they are small enough for me to work on them without over exerting myself and they fit rather well into my two car garage.

-------------------------

I wonder if a person couldn't put a steam engine on a garden tractor--just as a proof of concept.  I've seen some steam engines on eBay made out of 2 stroke gas engines...something to consider... Now THAT would be a project!!

 

Smitty


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#13 WH55 OFFLINE  

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Posted December 10, 2013 - 07:16 AM

. i'm retired on disability now and garden tractors are a poor substitute for diesel and steam locomotives on the one hand. On the other they are small enough for me to work on them without over exerting myself and they fit rather well into my two car garage.

-------------------------

I wonder if a person couldn't put a steam engine on a garden tractor--just as a proof of concept.  I've seen some steam engines on eBay made out of 2 stroke gas engines...something to consider... Now THAT would be a project!!

 

Smitty

I see no reason why they couldn't, Smitty. The actual steam engines on the old steam traction engines really weren't very large in comparison with the two (or sometimes 3) engines mounted on most railroad locomotives. The main issue that killed most mobile steam power was boiler size and capacity problems. A couple of railroads in this country tried triplex locomotives and ran into that problem because of boilers being too small to supply 3 pairs of steam engines. And just as some in this hobby use garden tractors to make scale or semi-scale models of full size farm equipment, I've seen a few 1/2 scale and smaller operating models of steam traction engines where the operator rides in a trailer pulled by the engine.

 

There really isn't a great deal of difference between the old hit and miss engines and the steam engines they replaced, if you look just at the engines themselves. I doubt many people realize the enhanced operator safety that internal combustion engines provided for everyone once they were invented. The smallest boiler contains an awesome amount of energy that can be as devastating as a similarly sized bomb if released in an uncontrolled fashion. :biting_nails: :biting_nails:


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#14 WH55 OFFLINE  

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Posted December 10, 2013 - 07:24 AM

Ok, so I got my brain in gear this morning and went to hunt up the link for the Struck dozer discussion I had with the fellow I mentioned on the Heavy Equipment Forums: http://www.heavyequi...on here. :wave:


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#15 boyscout862 OFFLINE  

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Posted December 10, 2013 - 01:13 PM

A steam tractor would be cool. In the late 70s there was a new magazine advertised in the back of Popular Science. I think it was Popular Machining. The bonus offered with a subscription was plans to convert a Ford A/C compressor into a steam engine. I wanted the plans but did not subscribe to the magazine. I have a large old single cylinder air compressor that I hope to turn into a steam engine someday. Good Luck, Rick




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