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Watch That Ice! It's Not That Cold Yet!


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#1 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted December 02, 2013 - 09:04 AM

Sad story on the news last night. Two brothers 8 & 9 drowned in SW Iowa(Creston) ice fishing in the family pond Friday night.  Guys if you Ice fish, be sure the ice is safe before going out on it!!


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#2 HDWildBill OFFLINE  

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Posted December 02, 2013 - 09:22 AM

I moved this over to the Safety discussion forum.  I think this deserves everyone’s attention, even if you don't live in one of the cold places.  We have had this same tragic accident happen down here.


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#3 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted December 02, 2013 - 09:53 AM

I moved this over to the Safety discussion forum.  I think this deserves everyone’s attention, even if you don't live in one of the cold places.  We have had this same tragic accident happen down here.

No problem Bill, this is where I should have posted it anyway.  And yes even in the Deep South it sometimes freezes and people can be decieved by the ice. I took a trip to Alamo, Tx.(next to Mc Allen) in December of 1990 and the coldest December on record froze clear below the border during that trip.  I ice fished on the early 70's when it was unheard of in Iowa. That was only done in the Northern states? It has become a popular winter hobby since, but people have to have a healthy respect for Ice or fun can become tragedy in a heartbeat. I would not consider going on the ice until there has been two weeks of below freezing temps.  As it was it was in the 40's Saturday and Sunday and is supose to hit mid 40's today and 54 tomorrow. Those temps can cause ice to become honeycombed(due to freezing and thawing) and will not support weight. It is supose to get below freezing next weekend but ice will be unstable now for a couple weeks.  I know people who will trust a few inches, but I like to see at least 8 inches of solid ice before I would go out.


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#4 boyscout862 ONLINE  

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Posted December 02, 2013 - 10:27 AM

I'm in CT where we have cold weather(Saturdays high was 31*). Every year there are several people that go through the ice around here. What I find amazing is how great a job the Fire Departments do at rescueing them.

 

I thought that this was going to be about driving because we had a 70 car smash up nearby. The roads were very cold, a warm front with rain came through and instantly turned the roads into sheets of ice. I did not go out Saturday nor Sunday because of the forcast of possible rain and I knew the ground was cold. None of the weather guessers mentioned this possibility. We all have to think for ourselves. Be Safe.

 

I carry a plastic 1 gallon bucket with a lid that is full of sand and salt mixture in my car. I hit an ice situation, 30 years ago, where I was off the road but trapped in my car because of rain on ice. With the sand I could have walked into a nearby diner and been alot more comfortable. Good Luck, Rick


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#5 oldtimer OFFLINE  

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Posted December 02, 2013 - 12:02 PM

When I was a kid they used to drive the town highway trucks onto the lakes and ponds in some towns.  Don'y know if they still do, but I think they do.  Cops would patrol, and if you were on a lake that hadn't been tested they'd try to catch you and then they'd tell your parents.


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#6 boyscout862 ONLINE  

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Posted December 02, 2013 - 12:23 PM

When I was a kid they used to drive the town highway trucks onto the lakes and ponds in some towns.  Don'y know if they still do, but I think they do.  Cops would patrol, and if you were on a lake that hadn't been tested they'd try to catch you and then they'd tell your parents.

When I was a kid telling my parents was the scariest threat. Now days I don't think it would faze most kids. The safest test of the ice is to drill holes and measure the thickness. As a town engineer,  I would not risk a precious truck on a pond or lake. Good Luck, Rick



#7 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted December 02, 2013 - 01:27 PM

When I was a kid telling my parents was the scariest threat. Now days I don't think it would faze most kids. The safest test of the ice is to drill holes and measure the thickness. As a town engineer,  I would not risk a precious truck on a pond or lake. Good Luck, Rick

They say 12" of ice will support a car or truck. And yes there are people who will drive on the ice around here.

But every couple years you hear of a truck or car falling through and every year there are a few snowmobiles lost through the ice.

The Sledders especially are lost on rivers. A couple things contribute to that. one is currents make for thin spots and water levels dropping leave the ice unsupported from below.  As you said the Fire Departments/Emergency Response are remarkably good at saving people from their own recklessness I admire their willingness to often put their own life at risk for others. . But sometimes they can not get to the scene in time? The responsibility is on the individual to minimumize their risk.


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#8 boyscout862 ONLINE  

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Posted December 02, 2013 - 02:08 PM

We lost a rescuer several years ago. He had a heart attack. Atleast he was doing what he wanted and didn't suffer for a long time. Probably the best way to go. Good Luck, Rick






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