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Interesting Article On Modern Engine Rebuilding


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#1 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted November 22, 2013 - 06:20 PM

Heres a link to site for an engine rebuilding company. There is a very interesting article on the main page that talks about how much engine construction has changed in the last few years and what that means for engine rebuilding. It's very illuminating!! A friend of mine has shipped a Turbo charged Subaru engine there after the local dealer and 2 local "experts" could not solve an over heating problem. We'll see if these guys can sort it out. 

 

http://www.scarborou...s_ssgm_1989.htm

 

 

 

 


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#2 Alc ONLINE  

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Posted November 22, 2013 - 06:38 PM

Good reading , thanks , after reading that it makes you want to put a new engine if it gets over heated  ( or in my case because I'm cheap , a used engine  lol ) in instead of getting it rebuilt.


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#3 Jlaws OFFLINE  

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Posted November 22, 2013 - 08:15 PM

After reading the article it reminds me of the old saying .....They don't build them like they use to .

 

Sadly that covers about everything you buy these days .

 

I realize that with all the competition between auto makers as well as the EPA setting mandates in the effort to increase fuel economy and the effort to lighten cars to get better fuel mileage . You'd think that the heart of the car ( the engine) would be the last thing they'd get chintzy about .


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#4 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted November 22, 2013 - 08:23 PM

After reading the article it reminds me of the old saying .....They don't build them like they use to .

 

Sadly that covers about everything you buy these days .

 

I realize that with all the competition between auto makers as well as the EPA setting mandates in the effort to increase fuel economy and the effort to lighten cars to get better fuel mileage . You'd think that the heart of the car ( the engine) would be the last thing they'd get chintzy about .

 

 

Most engines seem to last a long time these days and I always figured they were designed to last as long as possible.   I wonder if these latest ones are designed to only last a certain number of miles. 


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#5 Jlaws OFFLINE  

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Posted November 22, 2013 - 08:39 PM

Brian ,

My take on why engines up till the last couple of years lasted longer is because there considerably lighter than they were 25 years ago . But mainly because of improvements in engine oils especially synthetic oils like Mobil 1  that we didn't have till recently .

 

When I started driving 150K was about all you'd get out of an old V-8 before it needed rebuilt , but now I've seen some of the newer V6's like the 4.3 in my 1994 S-10 or the Astro vans go to 350K or more . Usually something else wears out before the engine .....LOL

 

Under edit :  I just realized that a 20 year old S-10 can't be considered as newer....LOL


Edited by Jlaws, November 22, 2013 - 08:55 PM.

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#6 DougT ONLINE  

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Posted November 23, 2013 - 09:51 AM

Another factor of engine longevity is the overdrive trans. At 65 MPH most of the modern engines aren't running 2000 RPMs.


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#7 braxx OFFLINE  

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Posted November 23, 2013 - 03:33 PM

Modern engines are built with much tighter tolerances. Requiring more diligent maintenance. My father told me that "back in his day" you changed your oil once a year or around 10, 000 miles. Because of the larger capacities of the oil pan and also larger radiator and cooling systems the engines didn't suffer too much from extended maintenance intervals. Modern engines/vehicles leave litte room for lax maintenance. With running 5/20 oil in low capacity oil pans (4-4.5qts is common), higher cooling system operating temps leave little room for "safety". I've seen a few modern engines fail or start to fail because of 10, 000 mile oil change intervals. One only had 30, 000 + miles on it but the customer only had the oil changed at 11k and again at 23k. The were not happy when they were told it would not be covered under warranty. But on the other hand I see many cars with over 200, 000 miles on well maintained cars. Sent from my SPH-L710 using Tapatalk

Edited by braxx, November 23, 2013 - 03:36 PM.


#8 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted November 23, 2013 - 05:19 PM

The latest engines are using synthetic 0w20 oil to get the lowest friction possible. I have a 2014 Mazda cx5. 2.5litre inline 4cyl direct injected engine that operates as a partial Atkinson cycle engine and makes 184hp. It uses 0w20 but the oil change interval is 8000km or 5000miles. This engine is pretty high tech and who knows how long it will last. It does run great and get good fuel economy though. 

  One of the problems that has cropped up with high efficiency engines running thin oils is oil consumption problems. In many cases the manufacturers consider 1 quart every 1200 miles to be OK! It's written right in the owners manual of many new cars such as the Subarus with the 2.5litre boxer engine. So far my cx5 hasn't been using any oil at all. When I buy a new car I expect the engine to last a long time if properly maintained. That's one reason I switched from Subaru to Mazda. The 2006 Forester I owned had bad piston slap and took out a head gasket at 75k miles. After that was repaired it started burning oil. That is pretty unforgivable in my book and I just couldn't buy another one, even though they are great cars in many ways. 


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#9 dodge trucker ONLINE  

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Posted December 07, 2013 - 02:01 PM

my exp is that newer stuff isn't designed to be rebuildable rather, designed to be thrown away and replaced as a unit... when individual parts are available one small part is priced at 90% of the cost of a new unit... I don't get that.

 

I could win tonight's big lottery and I still refuse to buy a new car truck or tractor, because the new stuff is JUNK    Id rather fix up my old stuff,  stuff that was meant to be fixed   I cringe thinking that the newest vehicle in the driveway is 13 years old, also our highest mileage and most recently bought... but in 10-15 years will todays cars and tractors even still be around to BE fixed? I have doubts.

 

I drive a 21 year old Dakota to work, 5 days a week, I put between 90-100 miles a day on it. and will do so til the frame (hey whats that?) decides to fold in half... short of that everything's fixable.   though I did replace the frame on my Wrangler a few years back...still own that and drive it quite frequently when I want to give the Dakota a break

too much plastic and cap in the newer engines.... many have abandoned timing belts and gone back to chains  but now those chains (still made of metal) are forced to ride on plastic guides and tensioners  No thanks.   I'll keep my OHV V8s and inline 6's until they outlaw them and destroy all remaining parts needed to keep them alive


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#10 dodge trucker ONLINE  

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Posted December 07, 2013 - 02:03 PM

Another factor of engine longevity is the overdrive trans. At 65 MPH most of the modern engines aren't running 2000 RPMs.

yeah but the biggest factor is MAINTENANCE  and the fact that so many people don't fix anything til they are stranded these days then do the absolute minimum to get a vehicle moving again at that point then blame the vehicle.  They can't take care of themselves

 

I cant get over the people that claim that you have to have a < 3 year old vehicle to have a dependable one, and don't understand how I can drive such old ones all over the county without worrying about breaking down (which I rarely do)


Edited by dodge trucker, December 07, 2013 - 02:05 PM.

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#11 Bill 76 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 02, 2014 - 03:11 AM

 

yeah but the biggest factor is MAINTENANCE  and the fact that so many people don't fix anything til they are stranded these days then do the absolute minimum to get a vehicle moving again at that point then blame the vehicle.  They can't take care of themselves
 
I cant get over the people that claim that you have to have a < 3 year old vehicle to have a dependable one, and don't understand how I can drive such old ones all over the county without worrying about breaking down (which I rarely do)

 I agree with you Dodge trucker,Most people don't know what maintenance is they just get in and turn the key and go.My oldest truck is a 76 K5 that I drove back from LA 15 years ago and I'll trust it to take me anywhere.But I do maintain it on a regular bases.It seems that the auto makers are takeing some of that away from us every year,for example no zerk fitting on tie rod ends and ball joints all in the name of saving 5 cents for a grease fitting,lubed for life my eye,I want to pump grease in until I see clean grease comming out,and the list goes on,SORRY ABOUT MY RANT.
But you are right on the money that many people drive it until it quits.I don't remember the last time I seen anyone checking their oil when filling up with gas.
As the saying goes Cars don't die----People kill em

#12 dodge trucker ONLINE  

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Posted January 02, 2014 - 06:55 PM

I meant to say "driven all over the COUNTRY not COUNTY... thing is if people would maintain what they have "driving it til it dies" would have a whole new meaning,  its unbelieveable how many countless thousands of miles being thrown away that they could be getting from their vehicles if theyd only maintain them... how much longer they'd go before needing another car...

and you couldnt be more right about things like the lack of grease fittings and such

 

My "drive em til they quit" certainly has different meaning than it does to "most" people... maintained, it will be longer before they do truly "quit".

I can't believe some of the simple repairs needed that make people ditch their present ride...

Remember when "valve jobs" were more common?  Now people back up 40 yards and punt their car for problems so much less daunting....  I'm the guy that gets stopped while at the gas station and asked "youre STILL driving that thing"? sometimes 5 years later.   

I have had cars people sold due to a shorted battery that they gave up on, that I've put another 90K onto... then sold for what I'd paid for it, still running. cars that have needed a starter or a couple tires being enough for past owners to give up on them.

 I haven't had a car payment in years.  i did that 5 year thing once... never again.  and 13 years later still own that Wrangler.

 

The 2001 Durango I bought for my wife a few months ago had 214,000 miles on it when I brought it home... she drives it daily and loves it. from the South, rust free and cleaner than many 2008s I see in the area...


Edited by dodge trucker, January 02, 2014 - 06:59 PM.





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